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Will!

Housing Associations and Housing Policy: A Historical Perspective

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I've recently finished reading Housing Associations and Housing Policy: A Historical Perspective by Peter Malpass.

Although the title makes it sound a bit dry, I found it a very interesting history of social housing from the days when the government thought that housing people was nothing to do with the state through free market experimentation to the government-subsidised, minimally-accountable Registered Social Landlords of the early 2000s.   The part I found most interesting was how housing societies operated when the UK last had freedom of movement before the Aliens Act 1905.  No distinction was made between British and foreign applicants for tenancy, but to be successful they had to be gainfully employed!

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interesting. Mind you the idea of immigration in 1905 would be mainly focused on ex-pats from wealthy backgrounds.  Blatant racism for the time would stop the masses from travelling.

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7 hours ago, Will! said:

I've recently finished reading Housing Associations and Housing Policy: A Historical Perspective by Peter Malpass.

Although the title makes it sound a bit dry, I found it a very interesting history of social housing from the days when the government thought that housing people was nothing to do with the state through free market experimentation to the government-subsidised, minimally-accountable Registered Social Landlords of the early 2000s.   The part I found most interesting was how housing societies operated when the UK last had freedom of movement before the Aliens Act 1905.  No distinction was made between British and foreign applicants for tenancy, but to be successful they had to be gainfully employed!

Good thread.

These days when "government thought that housing people was nothing to do with the state"; do you have a date for that? My first pass on this stuff is the Housing of the Working Classes Act 1890 so interested to hear if you had an earlier or later date in mind.

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9 hours ago, msi said:

interesting. Mind you the idea of immigration in 1905 would be mainly focused on ex-pats from wealthy backgrounds.  Blatant racism for the time would stop the masses from travelling.

The Act of 1905 was introduced to restrict immigration from those deemed less desirable. Britain had seen waves of Jewish immigration fleeing persecution and pogroms. 

There was also Irish immigration. A lot of the tube network was built by Irish labourers for example. 

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Once upon a time if you were working in the local community and you put your name on a council waiting list, there was a good chance you wouldn't have to wait to long before you secured a place to live....your points counted.

Governments no longer build homes to rent.......😉

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4 hours ago, winkie said:

Once upon a time if you were working in the local community and you put your name on a council waiting list, there was a good chance you wouldn't have to wait to long before you secured a place to live....your points counted.

Governments no longer build homes to rent.......😉

You used not to have to wait too long, but now you don't have to wait to long!

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3 hours ago, Kosmin said:

You used not to have to wait too long, but now you don't have to wait to long!

....on the housing list for years and years and years.;)

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On 06/07/2018 at 02:11, Jurassic Bland said:

These days when "government thought that housing people was nothing to do with the state"; do you have a date for that? My first pass on this stuff is the Housing of the Working Classes Act 1890 so interested to hear if you had an earlier or later date in mind.

1890 is the date Malpass goes for as well.  I found it interesting that a large part of what spurred government to take in interest in housing was model dwelling companies and individuals like Octavia Hill devising and demonstrating how social housing could be provided.  The ability to take the initiative appears to be one of the consistent strengths of housing societies.

 

On 06/07/2018 at 12:14, Kosmin said:

You used not to have to wait too long, but now you don't have to wait to long!

😀

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On 05/07/2018 at 20:38, msi said:

Blatant racism for the time would stop the masses from travelling.

Migh have more to do with the cost of an airline ticket back in 1905. 

Edited by BuyToLeech

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On 05/07/2018 at 18:32, Will! said:

I've recently finished reading Housing Associations and Housing Policy: A Historical Perspective by Peter Malpass.

Although the title makes it sound a bit dry, I found it a very interesting history of social housing from the days when the government thought that housing people was nothing to do with the state through free market experimentation to the government-subsidised, minimally-accountable Registered Social Landlords of the early 2000s.   The part I found most interesting was how housing societies operated when the UK last had freedom of movement before the Aliens Act 1905.  No distinction was made between British and foreign applicants for tenancy, but to be successful they had to be gainfully employed!

Now days to be gainfully employed does not help get social housing.

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  • 333 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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