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prozac

House valuation, the fault line

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Agents work on comission so they want the largest number of properties on their books.

If you invite house sellers to value your property they know that being greedy you will give your property to the company that gives you the highest valuation.

So they over inflate the number and then six months down the line when it has not sold telephone you with a more realistic number.

I think this is also the cause of silly numbers on property prices.

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While more and more sellers enter the market. No uncommon to see a place for sale in 2016 still for sale now but with more competition from others who want to sell.

It's so unfair perhaps the government should take more money from people who's only reliance is working for a living to support these poor homeowners.

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It's a strategy that used to work OK in a rising market. Eventually, the market would rise up to meet the silly valuation. The strategy doesn't work so well in a flat or falling market.

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Anyone else think that the larger properties, large gardens, high mantainence, security, heating, taxes, costs of upkeep including cleaning will fall faster........growing families do not have the numbers of children to fill the bedrooms, they couldn't afford the house with one kid and doing a full time job let alone two or three.

What would a retired couple want with four plus bedrooms?......thinking these types of houses are a big responsibility to take on bit like shopping is going out of fashion so is looking up to someone with a large house that does not use it, don't buy the need for the extra rooms for guests/family to stay......always plenty of empty homes around and about or rooms in hotels and guest houses for guests to stay, surely one spare bedroom is quite sufficient, always the sofa or put-you-up bed if needs must.

How many times do you see elderly people struggling to keep these places together....finding the staff, paying the staff........is not having something smaller and practical in a convenient place better, and having more life experiences like visiting, travelling doing new things......something easy to lock up and leave.

Do people buy these places to store stuff or to store themselves?

I can see big weight around your neck places falling harder and faster, is there still a desire for them?.­čśë

Edit to add: What I could see is two generations of a family buying a bigger place together.....now that should work better.

Edited by winkie

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1 hour ago, winkie said:

Anyone else think that the larger properties, large gardens, high mantainence, security, heating, taxes, costs of upkeep including cleaning will fall faster........growing families do not have the numbers of children to fill the bedrooms, they couldn't afford the house with one kid and doing a full time job let alone two or three.

What would a retired couple want with four plus bedrooms?......thinking these types of houses are a big responsibility to take on bit like shopping is going out of fashion so is looking up to someone with a large house that does not use it, don't buy the need for the extra rooms for guests/family to stay......always plenty of empty homes around and about or rooms in hotels and guest houses for guests to stay, surely one spare bedroom is quite sufficient, always the sofa or put-you-up bed if needs must.

How many times do you see elderly people struggling to keep these places together....finding the staff, paying the staff........is not having something smaller and practical in a convenient place better, and having more life experiences like visiting, travelling doing new things......something easy to lock up and leave.

Do people buy these places to store stuff or to store themselves?

I can see big weight around your neck places falling harder and faster, is there still a desire for them?.­čśë

Edit to add: What I could see is two generations of a family buying a bigger place together.....now that should work better.

Interesting concept like what the South Asians in the UK seem to be doing. They do it for cultural reasons are we doing this for economics.

this could change us to a more Victorian lifestyle 

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8 minutes ago, vincent said:

Interesting concept like what the South Asians in the UK seem to be doing. They do it for cultural reasons are we doing this for economics.

this could change us to a more Victorian lifestyle 

In areas of London where I lived they have always done this, two or three generations living together until they could break away if they so choose to create a new head of household, (sometimes they buy property for their children as a BTL investment) saves on rents, helps with savings....I think you will find many southern Europeans also have generations living together out of choice, the grandparents helping to look after young grandchildren whilst their parents work, saves on childcare......then the grandparents are looked after by their parents/family later in life......actually often this can work out very well, families that help each other often makes for stronger families as well as wealthier families.

Victorian Lifestyle......nothing will ever be the same as was the past, similar perhaps but different......people caring and sharing is not so good for the economy because money is not spent buying services like childminding and care costs etc......housing costs and bills can be shared saving money........food can be bought in bulk and home cooked..... children often will benefit having a better support structure around them.........would not suit all families but has a lot going for it.;)

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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