Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

winkie

What To Stock Up On Now Before Price Rises?

Recommended Posts

What is cheap today that will be more expensive in future....

What is expensive today that will be cheaper in future in real terms?

 

Clothes quality clothing, classics that are easy to wash and care for, used hardly worn designer mohair, cashmere....quality leather shoes that can be toed and healed.

Quality eco high MPG car not new.

Bedding and cotton material, good curtains.....natural fiber carpets/rugs

Tins of tuna.

Tools, electric quality household white goods and gadgets that will not age or be upgraded easily repaired......not rechargeable.

Musical instruments.

Bricks and building materials?????

Labour if you can't do it yourself.

 

Things that will get cheaper....... overpriced housing such as flats in certain places........anything that requires ongoing fees, charges and costs to stay doing what it was bought to do......😉

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the largest price rises in certain forms of packaging, simply because they are currently included gratis in the product price.

For instance, spray bottles:

http://www.firstaid.co.uk/images/products/medium/BF252.jpg

and pump soap bottles:

http://peaceproducttrial.weebly.com/uploads/1/2/9/7/12977935/4533053.jpg

A bottle of pump soap maybe lasts a week. It has 11 components, some fish-chokingly tiny and weights maybe 20g.

When you compare it to a supermarket, single-use plastic bag, something the wasteful might throw away once a week, it makes you wonder why these things are still on the shelves.

When they are removed from shelves, peeps will have to buy purpose made dispensers at £10 a pop. Like the free ones currently available, these will jam, clog, get mucky etc, and like all products that nowadays become less than brand-new, will find their way into landfill, I'd guess maybe 4 times a year. Save yourself £40 pa by stocking up on the freebies now.

As for pump spray, gardeners will pay £5 for a hand spray to mist african violets, zap aphids. These sprays soon fall victim to garden dust or oil-clogging. In the home, after repeated use, they jam, clog or the spring rusts up. Again, such sprays have and will end up in the landfill. Probably each house, having gotten used to spraying, will get through three of these a year, so another £15 pa.

And if you like small plastic bags, these are on their way out too, so you'll be forced to use maybe freezer bags for all that wrapping you used the old freebies for.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed containers and packaging will become more expensive.......that is why bulk purchasing stores where people bring their own containers and fill up with both liquid products and purchase by weigh products.....no fancy advertising just good quality food and toiletries we all use regularly......such as shampoo, washing liquid, cleaning products.... food such as pasta, potatoes, rice, sugar, flour, oils......one up from the discount stores....I am sure a quality, value, with convenience and eco friendly would take off massively.....😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, winkie said:

Indeed containers and packaging will become more expensive.......that is why bulk purchasing stores where people bring their own containers and fill up with both liquid products and purchase by weigh products.....no fancy advertising just good quality food and toiletries we all use regularly......such as shampoo, washing liquid, cleaning products....

... which would be a 180 degree switch from what we see now. Just try buying 10 litres of liquid soap from a 'cash 'n' carry' supplier nowadays to see how 'bulk buying' currently works: you'll pay more than for 20 x 500ml pump soap filled dispensers at the local supermarket. Crazy! And an environmental nuisance to boot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine takes her own paper bags to the supermarket when they visit, refuses to use the plastic bags on a roll they provide.....

 

It is crazy......personally I try hard to purchase larger quantities of items that I use regularly, that is why never buy anything in a pound shop, total waste of both money and resources.....sometimes lydl do their XXL sizes, if of value will buy.....autumn and winter buy 25kg of potatoes bags £8 or £9 saves a fortune, often better quality, don't mind a bit of mud.....always buy rice in large sacks, massive savings on that......the bio professional washing liquid huge savings over a 100 washes.......shops should offer more in the way of bulk buying purchases for shoppers......saves money, fewer journeys, better for the environment.... win,win,win.....nothing to lose.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, winkie said:

......saves money, fewer journeys,  .... win,win,win.....nothing to lose.;)

Whilst in principle I support that view, it does ignore the loss of possibly the most important factor of all - at least in these modern times, to wit, whimsy.

You say "win, win, win". Everybody else is saying "whim, whim, whim!"

Buying in bulk may well save money and resources, but it removes the opportunity to cater to ones fleeting desires. Far better to drop into the shops on the way home and browse the shelves for something that tickles your fancy. Or better still, just order a takeaway!

The mantra today is want -> satisfy. No tiresome saving, no deferred gratification. Pander to your every whim ... and then blame somebody else for making stuff addictive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

1st & 2nd class stamps. At least enough for a good few years of Xmas cards.

Cheapest way to invest in copper/numismatics: check the date of all 1p & 2p coins in any change. Spend any post 1992 copper clad steel coins (easy to separate from a large amount of change with a magnet) and keep any pre 1992 full copper ones. Pass onto grandchildren.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 30/06/2018 at 15:27, winkie said:

A friend of mine takes her own paper bags to the supermarket when they visit, refuses to use the plastic bags on a roll they provide.....

 

It is crazy......personally I try hard to purchase larger quantities of items that I use regularly, that is why never buy anything in a pound shop, total waste of both money and resources.....sometimes lydl do their XXL sizes, if of value will buy.....autumn and winter buy 25kg of potatoes bags £8 or £9 saves a fortune, often better quality, don't mind a bit of mud.....always buy rice in large sacks, massive savings on that......the bio professional washing liquid huge savings over a 100 washes.......shops should offer more in the way of bulk buying purchases for shoppers......saves money, fewer journeys, better for the environment.... win,win,win.....nothing to lose.;)

move to spain ! lidl is far cheaper there they are huge like tesco`s there. 1kg of giant king prawns 9 euro  rachmaninoff vodka 4.39 euro yes £3 odd for a bottle of vodka they sell for £10 here. 

i see why people are jumping ship and setting sail. the food is far far better. Pastel de nata 30 cents each freshly made. 

vodka and custard tarts and kings prawns who needs anything else. 😄

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, longgone said:

move to spain ! lidl is far cheaper there they are huge like tesco`s there. 1kg of giant king prawns 9 euro  rachmaninoff vodka 4.39 euro yes £3 odd for a bottle of vodka they sell for £10 here. 

i see why people are jumping ship and setting sail. the food is far far better. Pastel de nata 30 cents each freshly made. 

vodka and custard tarts and kings prawns who needs anything else. 😄

.....one thing I did notice in both Lidl and Aldi on the continent is that the quality and choice of food is higher than here in the UK.....how cheap it is dependents on the exchange rate.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/07/2018 at 02:24, longgone said:

rachmaninoff vodka 4.39 euro yes £3 odd for a bottle of vodka they sell for £10 here

Very low duty on alcohol here compared to UK. The locals tend not to get completely S-faced much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things that work!

Having already stocked up with more than enough 60/40 tin/lead multicore solder to see me out, I can't think of anything else, although DDT fly killer and TBT antifouling would be good.

Edit: I forgot Freon and Halon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce, I'm prezuming the reference to tbt antifouling was a joke to wind up boat owners.... I don't think even the "grey funnel line" are allowed to use the stuff now....but if you DO know a supplier, please send me a pm...... I won't hold my breath......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, solentmuppet said:

Bruce, I'm prezuming the reference to tbt antifouling was a joke to wind up boat owners.... I don't think even the "grey funnel line" are allowed to use the stuff now....but if you DO know a supplier, please send me a pm...... I won't hold my breath......

No, I was just lamenting things that really worked that you can't get anymore. The only one I had the foresight to stock up on was 60/40 tin/lead solder.

I find Micron Optima to be the best of a bad bunch.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 30/06/2018 at 12:54, Sledgehead said:

I see the largest price rises in certain forms of packaging, simply because they are currently included gratis in the product price.

For instance, spray bottles:

http://www.firstaid.co.uk/images/products/medium/BF252.jpg

and pump soap bottles:

http://peaceproducttrial.weebly.com/uploads/1/2/9/7/12977935/4533053.jpg

A bottle of pump soap maybe lasts a week. It has 11 components, some fish-chokingly tiny and weights maybe 20g.

When you compare it to a supermarket, single-use plastic bag, something the wasteful might throw away once a week, it makes you wonder why these things are still on the shelves.

When they are removed from shelves, peeps will have to buy purpose made dispensers at £10 a pop. Like the free ones currently available, these will jam, clog, get mucky etc, and like all products that nowadays become less than brand-new, will find their way into landfill, I'd guess maybe 4 times a year. Save yourself £40 pa by stocking up on the freebies now.

As for pump spray, gardeners will pay £5 for a hand spray to mist african violets, zap aphids. These sprays soon fall victim to garden dust or oil-clogging. In the home, after repeated use, they jam, clog or the spring rusts up. Again, such sprays have and will end up in the landfill. Probably each house, having gotten used to spraying, will get through three of these a year, so another £15 pa.

And if you like small plastic bags, these are on their way out too, so you'll be forced to use maybe freezer bags for all that wrapping you used the old freebies for.

 

As for pump bottles of liquid soap, you could avoid the problem altogether by buying good, old fashioned bars of soap that last for ages and don't need any plastic packaging. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.