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So I was inspired by this somewhat retro thread comparing 1994 with 2014.: 

 

I'd now like to compare 2018 with 1998.

So in 1998 I was a recently ex-Student having been in work properly for about 18 months and had just moved into my second job. I think I was on fairly good money for that decade, as I was on about £35k and was saving to buy my first house which I did roughly 2 years later. I think it would take longer now!!!

I do recall at the time houses were expensive, and had started recovering from a crash in the early to mid 1990s. This was also about a year into the first Blair Government. Little did we know quite how much they'd pump prices, especially from 2001 onwards.

As for music, it was getting a bit post Brit-Pop and there were some really bad football related or adopted songs in the charts, i.e. Three Lions (Baddiel/Skinner) and Vindaloo (Fat Les). I think I was starting to get the feeling that the music was much better than when I was a student.

Edited by Mikhail Liebenstein

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1998 was basically on the cusp of the internet age.  In 1996 if you wanted some news, you put the TV on at 6pm, 9pm or 10pm.  In 2000 your first port of call was the internet.  In 1998 the transition was underway.  In 1998 if you wanted to buy something, you had to basically trawl around shops in your local town to see if one of them had it.  If they didn't, you couldn't buy it.  In 2018 you can buy online from America, Europe or Asia at the click of a button.

Often I read that the trouble with 2018 is that there is too much control, too much nannying, CCTV and hatched plots behind closed doors.  If you ask me though, in 2018 the world actually feels more OUT of control than it did in 1998.  Who, honestly, is actually in charge any more?  Everything is so globalised and interconnected that no-one understands it, no-one is in control of it and no-one has any clue what's going to happen, or even what should.  As always, the outcome will be not as bad as people fear it might be, nor as good as it could have been.

The real question to ask yourself is "what in 2038 will I be nostalgic for from 2018?" and go out now and enjoy it as much as you can.  Because with 100% certainty there will be people, things and places that are here right now today that won't be in 2038.

 

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6 hours ago, scottbeard said:

1998 was basically on the cusp of the internet age.  In 1996 if you wanted some news, you put the TV on at 6pm, 9pm or 10pm.  In 2000 your first port of call was the internet.  In 1998 the transition was underway.  In 1998 if you wanted to buy something, you had to basically trawl around shops in your local town to see if one of them had it.  If they didn't, you couldn't buy it.  In 2018 you can buy online from America, Europe or Asia at the click of a button.

.........

The real question to ask yourself is "what in 2038 will I be nostalgic for from 2018?" and go out now and enjoy it as much as you can.  Because with 100% certainty there will be people, things and places that are here right now today that won't be in 2038.

 

I often forget the internet hadn’t really started going mainstream until 1998. I was at Uni studying engineering  from 1993 and had access to NetScape really early on (think it was released late 1994) and created my first webpages for a project not long after. I also had a mobile phone back in 1992, but again I was on a undergrad training programme with an electronics firm. So guess I have always been an early adopter.

2038 will be interesting. I am currently working in aspects to do with Deep Learning and Blockchain. I think BlockChain and the upcoming HashGraph technology is already good to go, it’s just we haven’t allowed society to restructure its around the Tech (this may take time or may not even happen) as a lot of regulatory and social change is needed.

Deep Learning is much earlier in its LifeCycle, but this will be introduced without a doubt. It has potential in so many areas, some requiring no regulatory permissions or being perceived as social good. So I think we will see a lot more of this tech in place in 20 years, including in many mainstream activities.

 

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1 hour ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

I often forget the internet hadn’t really started going mainstream until 1998. I was at Uni studying engineering  from 1993 and had access to NetScape really early on (think it was released late 1994) and created my first webpages for a project not long after. I also had a mobile phone back in 1992, but again I was on a undergrad training programme with an electronics firm. So guess I have always been an early adopter.

2038 will be interesting. I am currently working in aspects to do with Deep Learning and Blockchain. I think BlockChain and the upcoming HashGraph technology is already good to go, it’s just we haven’t allowed society to restructure its around the Tech (this may take time or may not even happen) as a lot of regulatory and social change is needed.

Deep Learning is much earlier in its LifeCycle, but this will be introduced without a doubt. It has potential in so many areas, some requiring no regulatory permissions or being perceived as social good. So I think we will see a lot more of this tech in place in 20 years, including in many mainstream activities.

 

and using AltaVista or webcrawler as your search engine

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13 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

I'd almost forgotten about those, not a patch on "Duckduckgo".

I used duckduckgo on my raspberry pi that I bought just last week, never heard of it previously

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This story on Sky News today seems timely:

https://news.sky.com/story/warning-that-nostalgia-in-politics-is-imperilling-liberal-democracy-11389504

Warning that nostalgia in politics is 'imperilling liberal democracy'

Two thirds of the public think life in Britain was better in a bygone age, a study by Sky Data and the think tank Demos suggests.

Two thirds of the public think life in Britain was better in a bygone age, and the increasing influence of nostalgia in politics is "imperilling liberal democracy," a new study by Sky Data and the think tank Demos suggests.

Some 63% of Britons think life is worse now than when they were growing up, against 21% who think it is better now, and 8% who think the quality of life has not changed.

That includes a clear majority of Britons in every age group - perhaps surprisingly, young people were most likely to think life in Britain was better when they were growing up (69% among those aged 18-34, against 59% of 35-54s and 61% of people aged 55 and over).

Similarly, 63% of the public think Britain's status on the world stage has declined since their youth, 55% think there are now lower quality job opportunities, and 71% think there used to be a greater sense of community.

Britons are divided as to whether immigration has been good (36%) or bad (40%) for the communities in which they have settled, with stark differences across political divides.

Labour voters and Remainers are much more likely to say it has been positive, Conservatives and Leave voters are much more likely to say it has been negative.

But the public is united in thinking immigration has divided the communities they settled in - 71% say immigration has caused greater division, including a clear majority across every demographic and across the political spectrum.

And Britons are worried that British values are under threat - 55% think the government is not doing enough to promote traditional British values, with 17% saying they go too far and 22% saying they get the balance about right.

Conservative voters are among the strongest critics of their own government on this measure - some 66% think they have not done enough to promote British values.

Demos also conducted qualitative research across Britain, France and Germany, which found many citizens of each country have been alienated by profound social, economic and cultural changes - and attracted towards nostalgic political messages as a result.

Demos's report warns that "the cost of mainstream politicians failing to respond to these developments may well be our societies becoming more exclusionary and less communal, underpinned by a more desperate, dangerous form of social competition - in short, the imperilling of our liberal democracies."

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3 minutes ago, rantnrave said:

This story on Sky News today seems timely:

https://news.sky.com/story/warning-that-nostalgia-in-politics-is-imperilling-liberal-democracy-11389504

Warning that nostalgia in politics is 'imperilling liberal democracy'

Two thirds of the public think life in Britain was better in a bygone age, a study by Sky Data and the think tank Demos suggests.

Two thirds of the public think life in Britain was better in a bygone age, and the increasing influence of nostalgia in politics is "imperilling liberal democracy," a new study by Sky Data and the think tank Demos suggests.

Some 63% of Britons think life is worse now than when they were growing up, against 21% who think it is better now, and 8% who think the quality of life has not changed.

That includes a clear majority of Britons in every age group - perhaps surprisingly, young people were most likely to think life in Britain was better when they were growing up (69% among those aged 18-34, against 59% of 35-54s and 61% of people aged 55 and over).

Similarly, 63% of the public think Britain's status on the world stage has declined since their youth, 55% think there are now lower quality job opportunities, and 71% think there used to be a greater sense of community.

Britons are divided as to whether immigration has been good (36%) or bad (40%) for the communities in which they have settled, with stark differences across political divides.

Labour voters and Remainers are much more likely to say it has been positive, Conservatives and Leave voters are much more likely to say it has been negative.

But the public is united in thinking immigration has divided the communities they settled in - 71% say immigration has caused greater division, including a clear majority across every demographic and across the political spectrum.

And Britons are worried that British values are under threat - 55% think the government is not doing enough to promote traditional British values, with 17% saying they go too far and 22% saying they get the balance about right.

Conservative voters are among the strongest critics of their own government on this measure - some 66% think they have not done enough to promote British values.

Demos also conducted qualitative research across Britain, France and Germany, which found many citizens of each country have been alienated by profound social, economic and cultural changes - and attracted towards nostalgic political messages as a result.

Demos's report warns that "the cost of mainstream politicians failing to respond to these developments may well be our societies becoming more exclusionary and less communal, underpinned by a more desperate, dangerous form of social competition - in short, the imperilling of our liberal democracies."

its a global world now, the genie has been let out of the bottle and wont be going back in unless there is a world war.

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5 minutes ago, rantnrave said:

This story on Sky News today seems timely:

https://news.sky.com/story/warning-that-nostalgia-in-politics-is-imperilling-liberal-democracy-11389504

Warning that nostalgia in politics is 'imperilling liberal democracy'

And Britons are worried that British values are under threat - 55% think the government is not doing enough to promote traditional British values, with 17% saying they go too far and 22% saying they get the balance about right.

Demos's report warns that "the cost of mainstream politicians failing to respond to these developments may well be our societies becoming more exclusionary and less communal, underpinned by a more desperate, dangerous form of social competition - in short, the imperilling of our liberal democracies."

We demand more Local Shops full of precious local things.

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8 hours ago, scottbeard said:

The real question to ask yourself is "what in 2038 will I be nostalgic for from 2018?" and go out now and enjoy it as much as you can.  Because with 100% certainty there will be people, things and places that are here right now today that won't be in 2038.

Totally agree! Although at times things can be difficult- try to enjoy every second!

Edited by UnconventionalWisdom

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38 minutes ago, hurlerontheditch said:

its a global world now, the genie has been let out of the bottle and wont be going back in unless there is a world war.

Or they stop gviing out benefits to migrants.

Stop benefitss esp. housign benefit for imiigrants, set an earnign thresholh - say 50k/single, 100k/family.

Poof! 90% of the UK's immigrants will go.

Start billing them for school and health care.

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Left 6th form and got my first job in 1998, working in Waterloo just outside the station. Started on 12kish and went up to 15.5k within a few months when I took over the roll properly. This was picking computer tapes up from the overnight backups and sending them offsite for an outsourcing company.

Had no email address at work, but they were just starting to roll it out (baring in mind this was a company full of mainframe computers over several floors). Used to leech N64 roms off the work line which I think was a 256k leased line, then copy them to floppy disk to take home. Lunchtime drinking was the norm, many people working the late shifts drunk and drove home as some of them crashed their cars nearby.

Used to bosh amphetamines to get the work done as it was boring as hell, only took me an hour or two, then I was free to roam around London listening to drum and bass. Saw the London eye being built, and the Imax on the roundabout wasn't there at the time, think it had just started when I left a year or so later. Was a great city to walk around, I went EVERYWHERE, you can still plonk me in London to this day and I'll know where I am. The south bank was a little grimey back then, street markets in Lambeth, normal working class everywhere. No idea how it is now.

Also the first year I had an E.European begger come up to me with a piece of paper as they couldn't speak English. Seemed really weird, never would have thought how normal it would become.

Clubbing at the weeked to Bagleys, driving my Renault 5 turbo, It was good times, but I think that largely came from being young. Most of the clubs now have shut down and there's no way you'd get away from being pulled by the police these days after clubbing all night with eyes like saucers and being allowed to drive off.

There was little problem getting employment in those days.

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6 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Or they stop gviing out benefits to migrants.

Stop benefitss esp. housign benefit for imiigrants, set an earnign thresholh - say 50k/single, 100k/family.

Poof! 90% of the UK's immigrants will go.

Start billing them for school and health care.

not sure its as simple as that though

some of the migrants left places of abject poverty and even sharing a house with 10 other people in the UK is better than returning home. there is more immigration from outside the EU than in it. unless the western world helps sorting out the poorer nations in the world there will always be mass migration. simply handing money to poorer countries does not sort the problems.

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2 hours ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

I often forget the internet hadn’t really started going mainstream until 1998. I was at Uni studying engineering  from 1993 and had access to NetScape really early on (think it was released late 1994) and created my first webpages for a project not long after. I also had a mobile phone back in 1992, but again I was on a undergrad training programme with an electronics firm. So guess I have always been an early adopter.

2038 will be interesting. I am currently working in aspects to do with Deep Learning and Blockchain. I think BlockChain and the upcoming HashGraph technology is already good to go, it’s just we haven’t allowed society to restructure its around the Tech (this may take time or may not even happen) as a lot of regulatory and social change is needed.

Deep Learning is much earlier in its LifeCycle, but this will be introduced without a doubt. It has potential in so many areas, some requiring no regulatory permissions or being perceived as social good. So I think we will see a lot more of this tech in place in 20 years, including in many mainstream activities.

I was at university in 1998 so I had access to the internet, but it was very much in its infancy and not something many people had in their homes. It wasn't something particularly useful for most, largely another toy for the computer enthusiast, although it had started to become a useful academic source by then for finding papers IIRC (although certainly wasn't the main one at the time, which was to have a trawl through the library).

Can't say I'm looking forward to 2038, I've yet to hear a vision of the future with any appeal.

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1 minute ago, honkydonkey said:

Also the first year I had an E.European begger come up to me with a piece of paper as they couldn't speak English. Seemed really weird, never would have thought how normal it would become.

I remember that too... Seemed to be as a result of the fighting around the break up of Yugoslavia?

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2 minutes ago, honkydonkey said:

Left 6th form and got my first job in 1998, working in Waterloo just outside the station. Started on 12kish and went up to 15.5k within a few months when I took over the roll properly. This was picking computer tapes up from the overnight backups and sending them offsite for an outsourcing company.

Had no email address at work, but they were just starting to roll it out (baring in mind this was a company full of mainframe computers over several floors). Used to leech N64 roms off the work line which I think was a 256k leased line, then copy them to floppy disk to take home. Lunchtime drinking was the norm, many people working the late shifts drunk and drove home as some of them crashed their cars nearby.

Used to bosh amphetamines to get the work done as it was boring as hell, only took me an hour or two, then I was free to roam around London listening to drum and bass. Saw the London eye being built, and the Imax on the roundabout wasn't there at the time, think it had just started when I left a year or so later. Was a great city to walk around, I went EVERYWHERE, you can still plonk me in London to this day and I'll know where I am. The south bank was a little grimey back then, street markets in Lambeth, normal working class everywhere. No idea how it is now.

Also the first year I had an E.European begger come up to me with a piece of paper as they couldn't speak English. Seemed really weird, never would have thought how normal it would become.

Clubbing at the weeked to Bagleys, driving my Renault 5 turbo, It was good times, but I think that largely came from being young. Most of the clubs now have shut down and there's no way you'd get away from being pulled by the police these days after clubbing all night with eyes like saucers and being allowed to drive off.

There was little problem getting employment in those days.

great times!!

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1 minute ago, rantnrave said:

I remember that too... Seemed to be as a result of the fighting around the break up of Yugoslavia?

Very likely, some old women with those black headscarves. Couldn't have looked more Yugoslavian if she tried.

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9 hours ago, scottbeard said:

Often I read that the trouble with 2018 is that there is too much control, too much nannying, CCTV and hatched plots behind closed doors.  If you ask me though, in 2018 the world actually feels more OUT of control than it did in 1998.  Who, honestly, is actually in charge any more?  Everything is so globalised and interconnected that no-one understands it, no-one is in control of it and no-one has any clue what's going to happen, or even what should.  As always, the outcome will be not as bad as people fear it might be, nor as good as it could have been.

It's different sorts of control at different levels, so I don't think too much control and too out of control are mutually exclusive. Indeed one can lead to the other, fear and uncertainty can result in people demanding being controlled. That comes with good and bad - some things that should've been shaken up a long time ago are starting to get shaken whilst other things that are better unchanged are getting brought down by it too.

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2 minutes ago, rantnrave said:

Any older folk around who could contrast 1978 with 1998 for us?

1978 was great, plenty of attention, all my food made for me, no stress etc. Great! Mind you there's probably a bit of observation bias going on there, since I hadn't even started school then.

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1998... I bought my first modem the year before. Freeserve was a serious game changer for domestic internet in the UK because the only charge was a local rate call. I recall going into the local Dixons for a setup CD and asking "What's the catch?". Just think, you could browse the net at home for only about a quid per hour at the weekends.

On other matters I'm a little surprised I'm still driving a recognisable car in 2018 and don't expect to be doing that in 2038.

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17 minutes ago, rantnrave said:

Any older folk around who could contrast 1978 with 1998 for us?

Entered my apprenticeship in 1978 - Year later Maggie got in. Well paid -world was your oyster feeling which only got better. Of the decades 80's,90's 00's My feeling was late 80's had the best vibe although closely matched by middle 90's - Had the feeling even late 90's that things were going off the boil.

I think I have said before 1980 -2000ish the world seemed in balance - hard work rewarded etc

 

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10 hours ago, scottbeard said:

The real question to ask yourself is "what in 2038 will I be nostalgic for from 2018?" and go out now and enjoy it as much as you can.  Because with 100% certainty there will be people, things and places that are here right now today that won't be in 2038.

 

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be. But then again, it never was...

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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