Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

juvenal

Asda and Sainsbury merger

Recommended Posts

Its just reflecting the changing social structure in the UK

It always used to be

Upper Class = Waitrose
Middle class = Sainsburys
Working class = Asda

Now its going to be

Upper Class = Waitrose
-
Working class = Asdaburys
Poverty class = Asdaburys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just had a Waitrose online shop delivered.  Apart from the guilt that some poor soul has been 'picking' my goods in the early hours of the morning it works for me.  With various discounts and incentives a £97 shop has cost £64 plus a free Newspaper and free delivery.  A balance of Waitrose and Aldi seems to be the best I can come up with round here.

I want to like Sainsbury's but they don't seem to compare well with either Waitrose or Aldi.  As for ASDA, my limited forays into their stores convinces me not to repeat the experience if at all possible and that's before you consider Walmarts history of being a poor employer and their tendency to 'punish' their suppliers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Habeas Domus said:

Middle class = Sainsburys

Its a shitty, overpriced supermarket, no more 'classy' than Tesco's or Asda.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dougless said:

history of being a poor employer and their tendency to 'punish' their suppliers.

I shop at Asda (Battersea) several days a week (I walk past the door on the way to work). If they mistreat their staff, they seem to like it as a lot of them have been there 10+ years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Peter Hun said:

I shop at Asda (Battersea) several days a week (I walk past the door on the way to work). If they mistreat their staff, they seem to like it as a lot of them have been there 10+ years

You need to read up on their parent company, Walmart - a really unpleasant organisation and reason enough to boycott ASDA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have such a deep loathing of Walmart that I had decided to sell but ironically the Sainsbury/ASDA debacle has benefited me - managed to offload my shares at 324p.  I will have to re-balance my portfolio now but retail is looking very shaky so may avoid altogether. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/04/2018 at 10:16, Habeas Domus said:

Upper Class = Waitrose
Middle class = Sainsburys
Working class = Asda

I agree that the middle class segment is disappearing fast and being middle of the road is where companies are most likely to be run over. How about:

Upper Class = Amazon Prime
Working class = Walmart

It's all about logistics and predictive data. One of the big players will one day buy John Lewis/Waitrose. I reckon Amazon are best placed. Whole Foods acquisition was mainly a US play. Amazon UK now has the same revenue as the John Lewis Partnership but is growing at 19% (31% globally) compared to 2.1%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never understood Supermarket bigotry - They sell the same stuff mostly but at different price points. For example, I'd rather pay £1 for a 2 litre bottle of Pepsi at "Store A" than £1.80 at "Store B".

 

At the end of the day it is just food. You put it in one end and shit it out the other. What matters is the nutrition and the price you paid. If you are paying more just to say you shop at *insert name here* you are frankly retarded (Shareholders excluded - back your investments by all means).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Renewed Investor said:

I've never understood Supermarket bigotry - They sell the same stuff mostly but at different price points. For example, I'd rather pay £1 for a 2 litre bottle of Pepsi at "Store A" than £1.80 at "Store B".

 

At the end of the day it is just food. You put it in one end and shit it out the other. What matters is the nutrition and the price you paid. If you are paying more just to say you shop at *insert name here* you are frankly retarded (Shareholders excluded - back your investments by all means).

Because this is Britain land of the Brand morons. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/04/2018 at 13:53, Peter Hun said:

Its a shitty, overpriced supermarket, no more 'classy' than Tesco's or Asda.

inclined to agree.

I actually prefer asda!,food wise-doesn't have any airs or graces about being a little more on the budget end,like morrisons, but is priced that way.....and I think that they usually have a slightly better non-food section if you want to pick up a pair of jeans or a food mixer/bed linen etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Orsino said:

I agree that the middle class segment is disappearing fast and being middle of the road is where companies are most likely to be run over. How about:

Upper Class = Amazon Prime
Working class = Walmart

It's all about logistics and predictive data. One of the big players will one day buy John Lewis/Waitrose. I reckon Amazon are best placed. Whole Foods acquisition was mainly a US play. Amazon UK now has the same revenue as the John Lewis Partnership but is growing at 19% (31% globally) compared to 2.1%.

so who's the amazon target in the UK then?

as to "middle of the road" getting run over, methinks there is much mileage for someone like amazon purchasing "middle of the road" to sell to "aspiring middle class" at working class prices.

the problem with online food sales,is that it's very much like online clothes sales......there's always a variation in product quality/fit etc that for most people needs to be seen,touched and felt before making the decision to purchase.The bunch of bananas the operative picks may be unripe/over-ripe,have blemishes/bruises etc which is not to your taste...you avoid this when you get up close and personal.

negating that option is where the discount is needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as for "working class"...again there could be serious mileage in  class 2 "outlet" online....this solves a big headache for manufacturers and producers,especially of the two examples above..fruit+veg/clothes, but can also be extended to white goods with a bit of cosmetic imperfections.

my mum was lucky enough to have a neighbour who worked for electrolux many years ago,and the sort of discounts she got on x grade white goods was unbelievable.....got a fridge freezer and a washing machine at nearly 60% off,and both did about 15 years service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/04/2018 at 10:50, dougless said:

I have just had a Waitrose online shop delivered.  Apart from the guilt that some poor soul has been 'picking' my goods in the early hours of the morning it works for me.  With various discounts and incentives a £97 shop has cost £64 plus a free Newspaper and free delivery.  A balance of Waitrose and Aldi seems to be the best I can come up with round here.

I want to like Sainsbury's but they don't seem to compare well with either Waitrose or Aldi.  As for ASDA, my limited forays into their stores convinces me not to repeat the experience if at all possible and that's before you consider Walmarts history of being a poor employer and their tendency to 'punish' their suppliers.

My experience with online shopping with Tesco and ASDA hasn't been that great, especially the latter! Fruit and Veg out of date that day and Meat similar, which is no good if your shopping for the week. Would be interested in hearing more about Waitrose, it's only a place I venture to buy the odd item if I'm honest. How much do you order to get free delivery? Seriously considering going to a greengrocer to get fruit and veg, as the quality is far better

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I have noticed is that various supermarket chains are decreasing their range of products, ASDA and Tesco seem favourite. I really don't get Tesco for trying to entice people in by offering crap concession shopping, where this has happened I very rarely can find what I want in the main store because they can't fit it all in. ASDA is the place you go if you want to catch a cold or a nasty bug!

Sainsbury's traditionally have always talked down to their customers, it used to amaze me the number of university students that shop there! I can see why they are keeping the companies as separate brands because the cultures of both workplaces are so different.

Actually, I can't see the CMA allowing this to go ahead without stores being sold (like what happened with Safeway).

Btw, Sainsbury's has been making people redundant in the past few weeks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, oracle said:

 

my mum was lucky enough to have a neighbour who worked for electrolux many years ago,and the sort of discounts she got on x grade white goods was unbelievable.....got a fridge freezer and a washing machine at nearly 60% off,and both did about 15 years service.

Lucky if you get 3 years now only a few brands have any quality left. 

ebay is flooded with unused unwanted purchases i spotted a brand new dishwasher still sealed in its box for £70 no need for overpriced retailers when there are plenty of silly consumers with unwanted purchases ready to discount. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hectors House said:

My experience with online shopping with Tesco and ASDA hasn't been that great, especially the latter! Fruit and Veg out of date that day and Meat similar, which is no good if your shopping for the week. Would be interested in hearing more about Waitrose, it's only a place I venture to buy the odd item if I'm honest. How much do you order to get free delivery? Seriously considering going to a greengrocer to get fruit and veg, as the quality is far better

 

yeah me too.

I'm very picky about stuff like fruit & veg and meat. Especially meat. I need to be able to have a bloody good look at a joint to make sure it's as gristle-free as possible,and there's only select cuts that I have a preference for.

 

that's the bonus about a decent local butcher if you can find one.They will know where the stuff comes from and they will more often than not cut to order if they have a suitable carcasse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/04/2018 at 13:53, Peter Hun said:

Its a shitty, overpriced supermarket, no more 'classy' than Tesco's or Asda.

May not be the case everywhere in the country but Sainsbury have chosen their sites well in my neck of the woods. Boomers queueing down the aisles to pay premium prices.  Stores like Matlock gold mines. My experience of Tesco by contrast is super stores in urban areas within a few miles of each other resembling the Marie Celeste at times...eg. Beeston, Long Eaton, Ilkeston and Chilwell all within three miles of each other. What the hell were Tesco thinking of.

I think Asda may have their eyes set on the sites more than the set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hectors House said:

My experience with online shopping with Tesco and ASDA hasn't been that great, especially the latter! Fruit and Veg out of date that day and Meat similar, which is no good if your shopping for the week. Would be interested in hearing more about Waitrose, it's only a place I venture to buy the odd item if I'm honest. How much do you order to get free delivery? Seriously considering going to a greengrocer to get fruit and veg, as the quality is far better

 

I have very limited experience with online food shopping but Waitrose seem to be excellent.  No complaints with the quality of the vegetables or the sell by dates on the packaged goods.  I think you need to spend £60 to get free delivery and if you are registered with them (My Waitrose) you get a free newspaper as well.  Ocado also have a good reputation so it might be worth trying them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hectors House said:

Actually, I can't see the CMA allowing this to go ahead without stores being sold (like what happened with Safeway).

 

Probably, and that'll surely really help us all (sarcasm). Like how they keep sticking their nose into Sky bids, when it's Twitter and Facebook who are messing with elections. Or how's about the takeover of HBoS by Lloyds? Remember that one? Shareholders in Lloyds got to bail out Gordon Brown, who in turn promised to allow a state-sponsored oligopoly .... until it suited the new government to remind shareholders that such things were against competition and ordered them to offload stuff to a bunch of Spanish cowboys. TSB is the result. Happy with that one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, oracle said:

so who's the amazon target in the UK then?

as to "middle of the road" getting run over, methinks there is much mileage for someone like amazon purchasing "middle of the road" to sell to "aspiring middle class" at working class prices.

the problem with online food sales,is that it's very much like online clothes sales......there's always a variation in product quality/fit etc that for most people needs to be seen,touched and felt before making the decision to purchase.The bunch of bananas the operative picks may be unripe/over-ripe,have blemishes/bruises etc which is not to your taste...you avoid this when you get up close and personal.

negating that option is where the discount is needed.

I think Waitrose is the nearest match in the UK to Whole Foods in the US, with the same logic of premium grocery and logistics access to an Amazon Prime audience. The John Lewis department stores are an additional element that could benefit Amazon's move into fashion and homeware etc. There is the complexity of the John Lewis ownership system.

The Argos/Ebay partnership is an interesting one too. Effectively Argos are a network of warehouses on the High Street, making them potentially attractive to an online retailer looking to get into bricks and mortar. But it's a very different audience to Amazon Prime.

Very much to your point, online retailers often need a physical presence for three reasons: Firstly, shoppers like choosing some items in person. However, I think more importantly, shoppers need physical stores for exploration and up-selling (you cannot search for what you don't know about) and thirdly, stores are a cost-effective means of customer acquisition. Online pure-plays like Blue Apron and Jet.com (before Walmart bought it) were paying a fortune in marketing for each new customer. As for low-consideration items like washing powder or toilet paper, these can be sent via a subscription model based on customer data history. Amazon are world-class at this. I suspect they will send these items to Amazon Prime customers based on usage, so the customer doesn't even request them. This will have a massive impact on brands in these categories, because why would you ever switch brands once you're set up on the system?

The digital/physical future of retail is already pretty clear. For any traditional (non-niche) player to compete with the likes of Amazon, they're going to need to bulk up, not least to obtain access to cheap capital, logistical scale and comprehensive data. I think that's what this Sainsburys/Asda/Walmart deal is all about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.