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30% pay rises for NHS workers.


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This actually makes financial sense, if they can attract more full time Nurses etc. they shouldn't need as many expensive agency staff.

If they can keep the ones they train as well they'll be quids in. Nursing used to be a vocation and therefore nurses stayed on, unfortunately with today's economy some can't survive on an NHS nurses pay.

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2 minutes ago, Option5 said:

This actually makes financial sense, if they can attract more full time Nurses etc. they shouldn't need as many expensive agency staff.

If they can keep the ones they train as well they'll be quids in. Nursing used to be a vocation and therefore nurses stayed on, unfortunately with today's economy some can't survive on an NHS nurses pay.

Agreed

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10 minutes ago, Option5 said:

This actually makes financial sense, if they can attract more full time Nurses etc. they shouldn't need as many expensive agency staff.

If they can keep the ones they train as well they'll be quids in. Nursing used to be a vocation and therefore nurses stayed on, unfortunately with today's economy some can't survive on an NHS nurses pay.

I dont think it's the nurses, it's the porters...need to attract the EEs and Somalians.

The fact remains...public sector workers wages/pensions/T&Cs still much higher than the people forced to pay for them. That is not sustainable

 

Nothing in the UK ponz-economy seems to be sustainable.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere
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56 minutes ago, stuckmojo said:

Agreed

I never understood the logic in this, I work in the NHS for years in an admin role. They would bring in a lot of agency staff, my thoughts were surely if you paid a higher base salary you would attract home-grown nurses into the profession who are likely to stick around, also you would drive out agencies who charge an higher rate

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1 hour ago, Option5 said:

This actually makes financial sense, if they can attract more full time Nurses etc. they shouldn't need as many expensive agency staff.

If they can keep the ones they train as well they'll be quids in. Nursing used to be a vocation and therefore nurses stayed on, unfortunately with today's economy some can't survive on an NHS nurses pay.

Not really.

For the education., Nurses are extremelely well paid. chuck i nthe pension and its lucrative.

Dont need more Nurses - we need to be keeping less people in hospital.

Pay was only a factor in 1/7th of Nurses leaving. Trust me, a Nurse (or a teacher, or a copper) cannot earn anywhere close to what they are on poutside of pubic sector.

Most Nurses leave as they get fed up with the NHS. If the NHS was broken up, monopoly destroyed than there would be the option to work elswhere as a Nurse.

 

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1 minute ago, Jabbabhoy said:

I never understood the logic in this, I work in the NHS for years in an admin role. They would bring in a lot of agency staff, my thoughts were surely if you paid a higher base salary you would attract home-grown nurses into the profession who are likely to stick around, also you would drive out agencies who charge an higher rate

You could also match the agency wages, the agency mark up would be saved. A lot of NHS trained nurses have gone to agencies for a wage increase (some admittedly for flexibility) so match those wages and get them back

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1 minute ago, Option5 said:

You could also match the agency wages, the agency mark up would be saved. A lot of NHS trained nurses have gone to agencies for a wage increase (some admittedly for flexibility) so match those wages and get them back

Or you could run your payroll and staffing in a competent way.

Again, signs of a dysfunctional monopoly.

 

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2 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Pay was only a factor in 1/7th of Nurses leaving. Trust me, a Nurse (or a teacher, or a copper) cannot earn anywhere close to what they are on poutside of pubic sector.

Things like paying to park, (public transport is often not an option when working shifts) fixed shifts etc. Nurses do earn more outside the public sector, as agency staff.

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4 minutes ago, Option5 said:

Things like paying to park, (public transport is often not an option when working shifts) fixed shifts etc. Nurses do earn more outside the public sector, as agency staff.

Again, parking and issues is down to both dysfunctional monopoly - no thought of parking/not on list. And the wierd feudalism you get in the NHS.

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12 minutes ago, Option5 said:

Things like paying to park, (public transport is often not an option when working shifts) fixed shifts etc. Nurses do earn more outside the public sector, as agency staff.

Know a nurse who worked a late notice shift here in the Mids and got £44 an hour.

She was delighted as she was working in a hospital with less patients than her normal place of work.

NHS has problems with retention and recrutiment these days,mainly stresses in the system,lots of patients with very high expectations.

 

Edited by Sancho Panza
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14 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Or you could run your payroll and staffing in a competent way.

Again, signs of a dysfunctional monopoly.

 

Demand patterns play their part in the problems.

Including immigration.

Edited by Sancho Panza
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17 minutes ago, Option5 said:

You could also match the agency wages, the agency mark up would be saved. A lot of NHS trained nurses have gone to agencies for a wage increase (some admittedly for flexibility) so match those wages and get them back

The NHS could easily give these people some certainty in their shift patterns.Try organising chilcare with only four weeks notice and shifts that could be nights days weekends etc

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1 hour ago, TheCountOfNowhere said:

BBC reporting 6% pay rise for the NHS, over 3 years.

 

Also saying 30% pay rises for the lower end workings....salaries rising from £15K to £19K

 

Their game is clear to see

 

So much for the free market tories.

Clever politics. Looks generous, but in fact will be clawed back by lower tax credits. The workers themselves will see no change to the money in their pocket each month.

Edited by RentingForever
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5 minutes ago, btl_hater said:

I don’t get why anyone would want to be a nurse. What an unenviable job. They deserve a better wage.

Hello Jeremy.....

After 10 years of being a Nurse my friend pulls in 38k + a very good pension.

She does 3 12h shifts + one 8h shift  a week. Plus 2 nights a month.

80% of the time its pretty quiet. Theer is a reason why Nurses tend to being fat.

Her alternative is working 60h in a shop for about 14k. No pension.

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5 minutes ago, btl_hater said:

If it’s that easy then why are the people who work in shops for minimum wage not training to be nurses? I thought we had a shortage?

Why?

Because they listen to the BS spin of how little Nurses are paid and how long they work.

Seriously. 20 odd yars ago, thier were Nurses leaving to work in shops.

Nurses ages have gone up, a lot.

Shop workers have gone down, a lot.

Seirously, fpr the investment in eucation, which really does not need a degree, Nursing is lucrative.

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8 minutes ago, doomed said:

Very difficult to argue nurses are over paid, but I suppose it’s the internet.

I wouldn't say they are overpaid. Its a job I wouldn't want to do but I also would never argue its underpaid.

Pal of mine's burd was on high 20k's low 30'ks [Cant remember exactly] just a few years after qualifying. Decent pension and worked 3 x 12 hour shifts and had the other 4 days off every week to do as she wished. Or take extra shifts for great hourly rates.

She is now being trained as some sort of more skilled district nurse type role. Being paid her full salary with all benefits whilst being put through this course FULL TIME at College.

So she's getting £32k per year to study full time for two years. She's having a blast. And then come out the other end on the high 30'ks and only has to sign up to not leave for two years.

They do a very important job but anyone who thinks that's underpaid must live in some different UK to me.

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10 minutes ago, CanAffordWontPay said:

I was under the impression that nursing now requires a degree? If this is the case when taking on so much debt is it any wonder why the kids aren't attracted to nursing as their chosen career. 

Just the insane over education.

Nursing should go back to 2 years 16-18 at college, followed by 2-3 year mix of work and training.

Qualify at 21.

UK HE sector needs taking round the corner and shot in the head.

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24 minutes ago, btl_hater said:

If it’s that easy then why are the people who work in shops for minimum wage not training to be nurses? I thought we had a shortage?

I wouldn't want to be a nurse for any money. Its just not for me. But there are people out there who naturally like doing that sort of thing anyway. So for them to have a nice stable career in it - whilst also earning good money ? Of course many would move from a shop to do it. People are different.

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