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Earning Over £25,000 A Year Won’t Make You Any Happier

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I stoped reading at the victoria beckam sullen face remark.

She has a sullen face cos everytime she goes out theres a gang of w@nkers with cameras chasing her.

Lets put it this way;

I'd rather be rich and p!ssed off then poor and p!ssed off!

Edited by Nelly

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Hmmm, I don't know. It would give me £8K more than I'm currently on which would help me to start saving some money instead of having to fork out every last penny on gas, electric, water and council tax. I reckon being able to afford a holiday and the occasional meal out would make me happier, if not totally happy!

Edited by Bingley Bloke

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Hmmmm not sure about that. Sounds like an excuse for employers not to pay people more.

I think 25K a year is still not enough to be sure of getting the essentials for life, depending on where you live. I take the point that if all the necessities are covered, then that is a threshold, and extra money starts to get less important than the first 25K, but I think you can go a fair way up from 25K before money loses its power.

Even if this figure of 25K was enough to secure the basics for happiness, then I think the real point is having that much guaranteed for life. Part of the big worry when earning low amounts is the fact that it is impossible to build up savings, so you are always one pay cheque away from destitution.

Quite frankly, I don't buy this one.

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I came to the same conclusion a few years ago

A good read

'Chasing wealth can make you ill and earning over £25,000 a year won’t make you any happier. Who says so? An investment banker'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-2016859,00.html

Money does not bring happiness, but it certainly brings on a better class of misery.

Being rich and unhappy can be seen to show a lack of imagination.

Money does not give you happiness, but it gives you choices, and a life full of many choices gives a fuller life.

But what do you want from life...?

The most fun I have is on a motorbike that cost me £800 and a fair bit of enjoyment bringing it back to life..

SV650 :) not the fastest thing ever.. but I do giggle..

So, What do you want from life?

Personally I want the security of a home and enough left for fun.

Why do I believe in the crash?

Many reasons.

But I know enough that with no real wage inflation a massive mortgage that I would struggle on interest only payments would not give me happiness.. it would give me worry..

I am frustrated that I cannot afford a house, but I would be terrified if I had listened to all of those who said I could, and had bought.

Frustration comes from knowing more then some others.

Terror would have come from not knowing..

You think you lot are watching the news on house prices?

Imagine what mr

£170,000 interest only mortgage and a salary of £18,000 a year is thinking..

and if you don't think people like that exist.. they do... I just hope to god that there are not as many as I think there are..

For their sakes.

Bless them, god be with them..

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You think you lot are watching the news on house prices?

Imagine what mr

£170,000 interest only mortgage and a salary of £18,000 a year is thinking..

and if you don't think people like that exist.. they do... I just hope to god that there are not as many as I think there are..

For their sakes.

Bless them, god be with them..

Frankly I will have no sympathy at all when they come unstuck. It's their stupidity that has inflated house prices out of my reach and it's their stupidity that will see them eventually ruined for the likes of me to pick up the pieces. I won't gain satisfaction from their pain but I'll be happy to spend £100K relieving them of the burden that they paid at least £50K more for a few years before hand.

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Frankly I will have no sympathy at all when they come unstuck. It's their stupidity that has inflated house prices out of my reach and it's their stupidity that will see them eventually ruined for the likes of me to pick up the pieces. I won't gain satisfaction from their pain but I'll be happy to spend £100K relieving them of the burden that they paid at least £50K more for a few years before hand.

AGREED all the way.

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I have a friend who has been renting for many years (waiting for crash) – He has decided that he is going to buy as he can not wait any longer – as a FTB’er he is looking at houses upto £750000 – he seems pretty happy –

Whereas the man in the attached picture obviously has a good job but earns much less than £25000 and he isn’t happy

mamogram.jpg

post-1111-1138697434.jpg

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Maybe if you put that number at 40-50K then I would agree.

Whoever thinks 25k is enough in bristol should try it. Like someone else said, once you have paid the bills you have nothing left.

You need enough to pay the essential bills and food. Enough to save/pensions (to prevent retirement from being very unhappy). Maybe you can do that on 25k

Surely the option of children would be considered important for some, or even a week on holiday once a year. Maybe even a hobby? --You do not get to do it all on 25k

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Maybe for people who bought pre boom the requirement for decent earnings is different. Plenty of my friends pay between £300-400 per month for their mortgages (repayment and insurance). With no opportunity or particular need to trade up their fixed outgoings are not too high.

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I came to the same conclusion a few years ago

A good read

'Chasing wealth can make you ill and earning over £25,000 a year won’t make you any happier. Who says so? An investment banker'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-2016859,00.html

i think 25k is an average. the thing with money and wealth is when people tend to get some they want more and more and are never satisified,their investments etc occupy a lot of their lives .i dont think anyone on a million a year is that much happier than someone on 50k a year.if your goal in life is to be rich you will be sadly disappointed even if you become rich.

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I think the point is that only earning £25k is great if:

1. You could earn a lot more if you needed to.

2. You bought pre-boom and own your home outright.

3. You have £250,000 + in savings.

4. You live somewhere where £25,000 is actually a good wage.

If you live in the south east then £25k means half of your wages going out in rent/mortgage each month and not much left after bills etc.

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Frankly I will have no sympathy at all when they come unstuck. It's their stupidity that has inflated house prices out of my reach and it's their stupidity that will see them eventually ruined for the likes of me to pick up the pieces. I won't gain satisfaction from their pain but I'll be happy to spend £100K relieving them of the burden that they paid at least £50K more for a few years before hand.

WELL SAID!!!

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When I was a student with very low income I was happy - I never bought clothes or went out shopping, and neither did my friends.

When I had my first job I felt rich. I bought a few things, but the urge to shop had long vanished.

When I got married, and then got kids, it made me happy.

Now I earn bucketloads and I was able to buy a nice house and life for my family it makes me happy. I still have no urge to buy tat - we drive an old banger 'cos it's all we need in London.

The next money-related thing that will make me happy will be clearing the mortgage - because it will give my family security (my job is not particularly safe).

I reckon money buys you a lot of happiness though giving you security.

But a house full of tat brings no happiness at all.

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When I was a student with very low income I was happy - I never bought clothes or went out shopping, and neither did my friends.

When I had my first job I felt rich. I bought a few things, but the urge to shop had long vanished.

When I got married, and then got kids, it made me happy.

Now I earn bucketloads and I was able to buy a nice house and life for my family it makes me happy. I still have no urge to buy tat - we drive an old banger 'cos it's all we need in London.

The next money-related thing that will make me happy will be clearing the mortgage - because it will give my family security (my job is not particularly safe).

I reckon money buys you a lot of happiness though giving you security.

But a house full of tat brings no happiness at all.

Good post - I'd say it also helps to distinguish between NEEDS & WANTS - & freeing oneself from the habit of comparing one's own with others' possessions/lifestyles is useful too..

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'Earning Over £25,000 A Year Won’t Make You Any Happier'

Unfortunately this is largely a delusion - the rich say this so the poor don't ask for as many pay rises - and the papers publish it to make the majority of their readers feel better about themselves.

Back in the days when I was on under 12K - I remember thinking I was being ripped off, what did I go to uni for etc.

Since then I've been working for myself and now £25k seems modest - it's not just the money of course, the fact I don't have to put up with office politics, I can make desions without having to fight through levels of management etc are all contributing factors.

I'm happier now than I was before, and a damn lot of that is the extra security I have with my current income.

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When I was a student with very low income I was happy - I never bought clothes or went out shopping, and neither did my friends.

When I had my first job I felt rich. I bought a few things, but the urge to shop had long vanished.

When I got married, and then got kids, it made me happy.

Now I earn bucketloads and I was able to buy a nice house and life for my family it makes me happy. I still have no urge to buy tat - we drive an old banger 'cos it's all we need in London.

The next money-related thing that will make me happy will be clearing the mortgage - because it will give my family security (my job is not particularly safe).

I reckon money buys you a lot of happiness though giving you security.

But a house full of tat brings no happiness at all.

Spot on...in this world where money is king, and you are ripped off as soon as you turn on your tap to make a coffee in the morning, having a good base of money provides happiness because it provides security. Money is not about being able to buy sh1t, it is about not having to be in hock to your landlord/bank/whoever. Most people are shackled with money worries because most people are in debt. As long as I know I am not being exploited, THEN I am happy.

When I feel like I am being exploited, it sends me into a blind rage! :lol: Probably why I worked through University and left with no debts at all.

Having to worry about money all the time is not pleasant at all. Imagine owning your house outright...what a load off!!

Get out of debt people! :ph34r:

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I think the title is misleading....... it is not about 'rich' people being unhappy at all. It is about middle class taxpayers in the UK being unhappy.

Rich is a hell of a lot more than £25 or even £50k a year.

"Yet study after study shows that money fails to buy happiness. Incomes have increased threefold in Britain since 1950 but contentment levels have barely shifted."

Yes and both taxation and debt levels have increased by far more than 3 fold!!! Meanwhile the savings raito has collapsed..... but of course that's beacuse we all choose to spend all of our wealth now rather than saving...... yes of course.....

Why on earth isn't a young person on £30,000 a year paying 50% of that in taxes and living on the breadline in order to pay just the interest on the small 'box' flat that they live in jumping up and down with joy? How rich they are. How rich we all are under Labour.

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Needs and wants as an earlier poster said.

Start a family, surround yourself with like minded friends and live within your means.

Economise to afford luxuries. Learn to enjoy luxury

The best thing I ever purchased was a Henry Moore painting. Cost a fortune but the pleasure it gives me and others is immeasurable.

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"Yet study after study shows that money fails to buy happiness. Incomes have increased threefold in Britain since 1950 but contentment levels have barely shifted."

The thing is most people want to settle down in a little house with a little family and enough time off to appreciate it. I honestly think it is harder to do that now than in the past dispite any real increase in income.

I dont really care if i can get a tv or a cooker cheaper, those things make no difference to me

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The thing is most people want to settle down in a little house with a little family and enough time off to appreciate it. I honestly think it is harder to do that now than in the past dispite any real increase in income.

I dont really care if i can get a tv or a cooker cheaper, those things make no difference to me

I agree - it is harder to achieve that now than ever before. I know this has been discussed before on here but how many of us were able to achieve what our parents did by a certain age? Mine had a huge detached house in a very posh area of town, three children and my Mum was always able to stay at home with us and not have to go out to work, all by the age of 30. This was all on my Dad's reasonable salary as a middle manager in a bank. Nothing spectacular. In order to do that now, we would need to be earning about £200,000 by the age of 30 to purchase the house on 3.5 times salary. I'm not sure about the bulls out there who claim FTBs just aren't working hard enough, but I wasn't on anything like that at the age of 30. I'm still not now! Don't let anyone tell you it's always been hard to buy a house. The fact is, it hasn't.

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But what do you want from life...?

The most fun I have is on a motorbike that cost me £800 and a fair bit of enjoyment bringing it back to life..

SV650 :) not the fastest thing ever.. but I do giggle..

If you want fun on 2 wheels, buy a (proper) dirt bike eg 250cc 2 stroke MX bike and convert it for road legal use.

I've owned all kinds of bikes and NOTHING touches a low geared dirt bike for fun factor. It's fun on road and even more fun off it.

(just don't ride it fast in the wet on tarmac on knobbly tyres...)

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I think that above a certain point there is very little value in extra money, and there can be huge downsides through notoriety etc.

But up to that point, money gives you a much better chance of happiness - not just security. Money helps solve non-money problems. Your wife is stressed out - maybe home help will solve it etc etc.

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Okay can I just make a point here..........

The average person in the UK now has what.... £7000 unsecured debt? Plus a mortgage on top, and since the savings raito to income has collpased ( now negative?) people do not have bank savings or substantial investments.

What you earn is completely irrelevant, it is what you have left over after outgoings that matters. Would you rather earn £100,000 but pay 90% tax and £5k rent or earn £20,000 and pay 20% tax and £2k rent? This is why that article is misleading, average earnings tripleing since 1950 does not mean that 'profits' from earnings have increased at all.

In other words people may be earning more but they ARE NOT RICHER.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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