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Council tax deliberately has tenous links to property values. It hasnt been re evaluated since john major was PM when london was only on average about ten percent more expensive than other parts of the uk. There are other reasons why the councils there can keep their taxes lower,  but that basically sums up why someone renting a 150 grand semi in burnley can be paying noticably more than the owner of a huge property worth several million in london. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, dpg50000 said:

My band D in Preston, Lancashire is nearly £1800 !!!

The rates for those London Boroughs are absolutely shocking. 

I shouldn't make this personal but I am paying almost as much as £473.66 in Band A and I'm only paying 25%.

In fact I know someone who's on Jobseekers Allowance and is paying the same out of their JSA each month. 

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5 hours ago, longgone said:

Nice to see the richest in society paying their bit. 

 

Your Council Tax for 2018-19:

Band Westminster City Council Greater London Authority Total
A £277.51 £196.15 £473.66
B £323.77 £228.85 £552.62
C £370.02 £261.54 £631.56
D £416.27 £294.23 £710.50
E £508.77 £359.61 £868.38
F £601.28 £425.00 £1026.28
G £693.78 £490.38 £1184.16
H £832.54 £588.46

£1421.00

I pay an extra £2k a year in council tax than those in the same band in Westminster. Absolutely ridiculous, all they do is empty my bins and can’t even put the bin back where they found it.

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5 hours ago, longgone said:

Nice to see the richest in society paying their bit. 

 

Your Council Tax for 2018-19:

Band Westminster City Council Greater London Authority Total
A £277.51 £196.15 £473.66
B £323.77 £228.85 £552.62
C £370.02 £261.54 £631.56
D £416.27 £294.23 £710.50
E £508.77 £359.61 £868.38
F £601.28 £425.00 £1026.28
G £693.78 £490.38 £1184.16
H £832.54 £588.46

£1421.00

Cant have the politicians pay high taxes in their own back yards on their second homes paid by the tax payers can we.

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38 minutes ago, TonyJ said:

When Council Tax was introduced, the government thought voters would vote for local politicians who made efficiency and low CT their mission. It was only voters in prime London boroughs who understood that they could indeed have low CT, if they voted in politicians who made low CT their mission. Electorates in most other places have always chosen higher spending politicians to run their councils, even if they do complain then that their CT is too high. A few years back, my local council, Hammersmith and Fulham had a drive to bring its CT down from high levels to Kensington and Chelsea levels. It took a few years to achieve, but eventually they were running neck and neck in the CT tables.

Isn't going to work when half the voters get their CT paid.

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The differences in council taxes cant just be explained by inefficient councils. If you live in a less affluent area less money can be raised in high business rates, parking charges, which i believe kensington does. Poorer areas will also be spending more on social care and the like which they have a statutory duty to to perform and will be the most difficult area to make savings from. 

I know the old system of rates wasnt perfect but i would go back to that. 

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I would never argue that efficiencies cannot be made. However, in areas with high densities of poverty, a higher proportion of the budget is inevitably spent on statutory services for the poor, disabled and elderly, these costs are stubborn. In my area the council has closed the local library and park, which it has no statutory duty to provide. This is but a drop in the ocean and my council tax has still gone up. You then get the unfair sittuation of a working person, in a modest house, paying a high council tax for a environment that is being degraded. 

 

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11 hours ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

Up 5.7%

Total £3153

Most of the rise is clearly to pay for baby boomers at the lower end of the health spectrum and clearly this is just going to get worse.

I read councils have had a 49.1% cut from central government over the last few years.. 

mall whilst debt hits £2 trillion.. wonder what they are spending the saved money on? 

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I'm entitled to a 75% discount, but haven't received it for 3 months now as council tax office can't do basic sums and spend ages getting back to me. Then I at most can ask for it to be backdated for a month.

What can they do if you just stop paying? 

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6 hours ago, hughjass said:

Eventually , they'll be rumbled these Councils and they will be made to join up. I am in Leicestershire we have about 6 local Councils who look after planning and emptying the bins then the County Council who do the rest.  Similar number of Councils in Derbys and Notts they should be merged into one Council for the East Midlands. A large part of the bill goes to the pensions ands those at the top are the ones taking the most.

Yep see the other day the bin companies privatised to a French company.. ?

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What I find most galling is the difference between inner and outer London boroughs, I live in Bromley which is the largest London borough size wise yet gets the least assistance by central government.

Bromley Council leader Colin Smith admitted that this extra £58.67 a year for average Band D homes was “more than anyone would prefer”.

But he said the council was left with no choice because of the disparity in funding between inner and outer London.He called the perceived financial disparity as “plain wrong and unfair”.

Cllr Smith used Lewisham Council as an example of the perceived inequality.

He told News Shopper: “Lewisham received a funding assessment for 2017/18 of £135 million compared with £46.8 million for Bromley.

“If Bromley received the same level of funding per capita as Lewisham, Bromley would receive a settlement funding assessment of £146.8 million, a difference of an extra £100 million.

“Obviously some of that extra money would be spent improving key local services, but just to illustrate the point, if that additional funding was available and was used solely to reduce council tax the new council tax level in Bromley for 2017/18 would have been £332.19 compared to the £1114.02 it stands at today. A reduction of £781.83 or 70 per cent.

“How can that be considered to be right, fair or sustainable and indeed, what on earth are Lewisham spending all that extra money on?”

http://www.newsshopper.co.uk/news/16052182.bromley-council-questions-lewisham-on-spending-of-extra-money/

 

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12 hours ago, TonyJ said:

The London boroughs that have always been cheapest are Tory boroughs, which each have long term policies to reduce inefficiencies and keep CT as low as they can. They made it their overriding mission always to keep their CT low.

Broxbourne and Hertsmere just on the edge of London the same. Unfortunately for people living in socialist paradises it seems the left wing have trouble differenting between the duty to actively manage their finances so they can offer the best services and executing on an ideology. Prudent financial control seems anathema to them

God help the residents of Haringey in the coming years with a return to the hell hole of the 70/80’s

When I was younger and the Labour Party stood for something ie the working class. It was thought a Tory council and a labour government was a pretty good combination for exactly that reason. 

 

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Timek beat me to it. Another symptom of central government underfunding. It gets worse:

For example in 2013 without anyone noticing, central government not only undercut local authority funding, but also in their wisdom migrated public health commissioning from CCGs to local authorities. Who in turn tendered these services back out to Health providers. A fantastic example of market efficiency right there, not.

The admin and red tape involved in this folly would make your eyes water. So more resources to pay for to provide a public service on yet more derisory funding. Then you have the social care funding crises which in turn knackers NHS hospitals via bed blocking..

So if you want to blame anyone for your council tax rise, blame the honourable lady sat rocking in Number 10, and her cohort of money wasting fookwits.

Garden bridge anyone? Sure Boris here’s £xxx million to burn old boy.

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1 minute ago, TonyJ said:

It sounds like the majority here are against the concept of local government. Perhaps it is time to scrap local government, and centralize all services to Whitehall. They could then just be funded out of general taxation.

I am not far from it 

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28 minutes ago, PopGun said:

Timek beat me to it. Another symptom of central government underfunding. It gets worse:

For example in 2013 without anyone noticing, central government not only undercut local authority funding, but also in their wisdom migrated public health commissioning from CCGs to local authorities. Who in turn tendered these services back out to Health providers. A fantastic example of market efficiency right there, not.

The admin and red tape involved in this folly would make your eyes water. So more resources to pay for to provide a public service on yet more derisory funding. Then you have the social care funding crises which in turn knackers NHS hospitals via bed blocking..

So if you want to blame anyone for your council tax rise, blame the honourable lady sat rocking in Number 10, and her cohort of money wasting fookwits.

Garden bridge anyone? Sure Boris here’s £xxx million to burn old boy.

Apparently the councils sent back  £800m to govt meant for affordable housing, unspent, last year 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/10/housing-budget-817-million-unspent-astonished-mps

whats this about?

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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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