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longgone

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how would one cover up years of not working to future employers.  

only way i can think is lie on the CV about dates and hope they don`t check. 

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I'd simply say I took a break from paid work  as I had enough savings to live without working for money. ;)

 

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54 minutes ago, The Eagle said:

I'd simply say I took a break from paid work  as I had enough savings to live without working for money. ;)

 

6.5 years next week :lol: 

i am not sure i can admit that. although i have not spent any savings. 

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Honesty is the best policy in my opinion, just say you've had a 6 year career break. I do a lot of hiring and if I ever detect untruthfulness when somebody is talking about their past it's an instant no hire. How can you manage someone you can't trust? If the interviewers are good at asking questions it's difficult to keep a false story together. Not all hiring managers are ar5eholes who demand that everybody's CV consist of neat 5-10 year positions with only a weekend's break inbetween. The hiring managers who are like that are probably ones you wouldn't want to work for anyway so think of it as a way to screen them out.

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Remember that hiring managers have a job to do. They want/need to get somebody through the door to get a job done. You just need to show that you are willing and able to do the job, or could at least be trained to do it, and that you will get along with your coworkers reasonably well.

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Honesty is best. I've taken career breaks but during those times I made sure I studied, even if it was just online via coursera and even if it wasn't related to my career (there is a lot of interesting stuff out there). I noted this in the gaps. 

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10 hours ago, longgone said:

6.5 years next week :lol: 

i am not sure i can admit that. although i have not spent any savings. 

My 6 year gap was getting over a stroke. Would that work for you?

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5 hours ago, Dorkins said:

Honesty is the best policy in my opinion, just say you've had a 6 year career break. I do a lot of hiring and if I ever detect untruthfulness when somebody is talking about their past it's an instant no hire.

Quite agree. Probably best to tell them if you're still on parole too.

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8 hours ago, Dorkins said:

Honesty is the best policy in my opinion, just say you've had a 6 year career break. I do a lot of hiring and if I ever detect untruthfulness when somebody is talking about their past it's an instant no hire. How can you manage someone you can't trust? If the interviewers are good at asking questions it's difficult to keep a false story together. Not all hiring managers are ar5eholes who demand that everybody's CV consist of neat 5-10 year positions with only a weekend's break inbetween. The hiring managers who are like that are probably ones you wouldn't want to work for anyway so think of it as a way to screen them out.

i understand what you are saying but i have had plenty of interviewers lie to me about jobs in the past also.  i take job descriptions with a pinch of salt now. 

would you seriously employ someone who has been off the market for nearly 7 years without a valid reason ? ?

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4 hours ago, Bossybabe said:

My 6 year gap was getting over a stroke. Would that work for you?

did you have trouble finding work with the health history ?

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31 minutes ago, longgone said:

would you seriously employ someone who has been off the market for nearly 7 years without a valid reason ? ?

Yes I absolutely would, but then my hiring style has always been to recruit people who are motivated and sometimes a bit unusual rather than shiny identikit drones. I lead a research team who are meant to come up with and test new ideas so this works well for what we do.

Plus in the past I myself had a year and a bit off because I didn't feel like working. I didn't use it to skill up or see the world or learn a language or anything cliched like that, I just rested and read books and cooked nice meals and enjoyed being unstressed. When I went back to work it was primarily for financial reasons but I found I was far more motivated than the cynical worn-out person I was at the start of the break and it made me better at my job.

I've been back in work for 7 years now and I'd say even now I'm enjoying the benefits of the perspective that a year and a bit off gave me. I'm not scared to take decisions and risks unlike many of the people I see around me who seem to live in a state of silent corporate fear. What's the worst that can happen, I find myself unemployed again? Bring it on, it was great last time! Of course, I can say this because I'm a frugal HPCer with savings rather than a mortgage slave living hand to mouth.

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19 hours ago, longgone said:

how would one cover up years of not working to future employers.  

only way i can think is lie on the CV about dates and hope they don`t check. 

Don't lie, just tell them all the new and diverse things you have been doing, places visited, books read, people met, other jobs done.....say you are up for anything.;)

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2 minutes ago, winkie said:

Don't lie, just tell them all the new and diverse things you have been doing, places visited, books read, people met, other jobs done.....say you are up for anything.;)

so lie then :lol:

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42 minutes ago, Dorkins said:

Yes I absolutely would, but then my hiring style has always been to recruit people who are motivated and sometimes a bit unusual rather than shiny identikit drones. I lead a research team who are meant to come up with and test new ideas so this works well for what we do.

Plus in the past I myself had a year and a bit off because I didn't feel like working. I didn't use it to skill up or see the world or learn a language or anything cliched like that, I just rested and read books and cooked nice meals and enjoyed being unstressed. When I went back to work it was primarily for financial reasons but I found I was far more motivated than the cynical worn-out person I was at the start of the break and it made me better at my job.

I've been back in work for 7 years now and I'd say even now I'm enjoying the benefits of the perspective that a year and a bit off gave me. I'm not scared to take decisions and risks unlike many of the people I see around me who seem to live in a state of silent corporate fear. What's the worst that can happen, I find myself unemployed again? Bring it on, it was great last time! Of course, I can say this because I'm a frugal HPCer with savings rather than a mortgage slave living hand to mouth.

hmm may have to think up a valid sort of reason then.  i guess selling on ebay would not be one of them 

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5 hours ago, longgone said:

hmm may have to think up a valid sort of reason then.  i guess selling on ebay would not be one of them 

Don't see why running your own business should be seen as a gap in your employment history.

My suggestion would be to read the Deflationary Collapse thread from start to finish, then tell them you've been managing investments for the last six years, but missed the cut and thrust of the working world!

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14 hours ago, longgone said:

did you have trouble finding work with the health history ?

None at all. My previous reputation in the field was excellent. 

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12 hours ago, Craig_ said:

My suggestion would be to read the Deflationary Collapse thread from start to finish, then tell them you've been managing investments for the last six years, but missed the cut and thrust of the working world!

That will only ring true if they have never managed investments. ..

...

...

or worked. :lol:

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20 hours ago, Dorkins said:

Yes I absolutely would, but then my hiring style has always been to recruit people who are motivated and sometimes a bit unusual rather than shiny identikit drones.

..... but I found I was far more motivated than the cynical worn-out person I was at the start of the break and it made me better at my job.

I've been back in work for 7 years now and I'd say even now I'm enjoying the benefits of the perspective that a year and a bit off gave me. I'm not scared to take decisions and risks unlike many of the people I see around me who seem to live in a state of silent corporate fear......

I'm about to career change, so appreciate this post a great deal.  I've decided to step off the daily grind and try something different.  I'm quite innovative and that quality is being crushed in my current circumstances.  Thanks for an insightful post.

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28 minutes ago, Does Commute Abit said:

I'm about to career change, so appreciate this post a great deal.  I've decided to step off the daily grind and try something different.  I'm quite innovative and that quality is being crushed in my current circumstances.  Thanks for an insightful post.

My pleasure, I hope you find a niche that lets you have fun and innovate.

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On 26/01/2018 at 4:30 PM, longgone said:

would you seriously employ someone who has been off the market for nearly 7 years without a valid reason ? ?

When I managed a research team, it wouldn't have ruled someone out. However, as Dorkins alludes to, research is an area where competence, conscientiousness and (if the recruiter is at all enlightened) slightly odd ways of thinking about things, are all very valuable - indeed essential.

A long career break might still have been a problem, though, because HR have can have a big say, and they are usually heavily into box-ticking. What might worry them about a long interval away from a traditional work-place is that it could be evidence the person won't get on with colleagues; and in particular, (not that this would be the language used) would have a low tolerance for 4rseholes. You might think that would be a good thing, but unless you are specifically brought in to change a culture, employers tend not to like people who will disrupt the current social structure in the workplace.

In your case, if you have been undertaking any kind of economic activity for 6 years, that's not a blank on your CV (in the way that developing alcoholism, as a hobby, would be). If you have been selling things online, you can tell a great story about the entrepreneurial, marketing and financial skills you have used/developed. You shouldn't have any trouble making it sound both positive and as giving you distinctive experience that most of the other candidates will lack. The fact you have survived doing it for 6 years would actually be prima facie evidence that you were good at it. Entrepreneurialism is worshipped in many workplaces (that are packed with drones), with almost the same fervour as the cult of the CEO. I wouldn't go as far as saying you were your own CEO, though, unless the HR girl (it usually is a girl) is obnoxious and disparaging.  

I think the things you would have to convey (ideally subtly) are that you are an agreeable person, and you are enthusiastic about what you're trying to get into. You don't have to have a sparkling social life, just emphasize that you have to interact in various ways with people to make your online business a success, and perhaps have a hobby that involves other friends. Obviously, the other thing you will need to convince the recruiter of, is that you are not out of date, nor too rusty in your skills. Hopefully there will be some opportunity to do that in the interview, but some more evidence (e.g. relevant hobby projects) would serve you well.

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Best of luck, by the way, longgone. I had a big change of career last year, and although I was moving from one workplace to another, I had got so demoralised and depressed in the previous place, I might have been in better mental shape had I just spent three years sitting on a beach. Thus, I can empathise with where you're coming from.

In my case, when the key question about "why are you leaving your old job?" came up, I made sure my answer contained only the truth ... but perhaps not all of the truth. To wit:

I did say: my old job had meant that I had recently been working on areas that were not close to my heart. I stuck with the job, because people depended on me, but I really wanted to get back to working on subjects I really enjoyed.

I didn't say: the old place was run by parasitic career-managers who had stopped doing any real work as soon as they possibly could, and were now waiting it out to retirement, while taking credit for anything that happened despite their obstructiveness.

I also didn't say: if I was still in my current role in six months' time, I would have either killed myself, or (more constructively) killed my boss.

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2 hours ago, Toast said:

Best of luck, by the way, longgone. I had a big change of career last year, and although I was moving from one workplace to another, I had got so demoralised and depressed in the previous place, I might have been in better mental shape had I just spent three years sitting on a beach. Thus, I can empathise with where you're coming from.

In my case, when the key question about "why are you leaving your old job?" came up, I made sure my answer contained only the truth ... but perhaps not all of the truth. To wit:

I did say: my old job had meant that I had recently been working on areas that were not close to my heart. I stuck with the job, because people depended on me, but I really wanted to get back to working on subjects I really enjoyed.

I didn't say: the old place was run by parasitic career-managers who had stopped doing any real work as soon as they possibly could, and were now waiting it out to retirement, while taking credit for anything that happened despite their obstructiveness.

I also didn't say: if I was still in my current role in six months' time, I would have either killed myself, or (more constructively) killed my boss.

i can fully understand where you are coming from. my career if you can call it that has been a sort of backwards affair, i was earning good money 15-20 years ago as an enthusiastic IT guy 20 years old, got a job in the city worked on site in a bank doing 2nd some 3rd line stuff worked along side some infrastructure guys and the guys that looked after the dealers. learnt a lot there although that knowledge is all worthless now, not much demand for NT4 and os2 warp setting up 3270 and as/400 links but hey that was the thing of the time. 

worked in aviation for 6 years supporting an airline doing not stop call out work for server farms 24/7. stressful when it goes wrong "aircraft on ground" was always the result when IT failed. But there was plenty of work at the time, i remember claiming 800-900 quid just for a saturday sunday call out some times 3 times a month mega tax bills most months. 

worked in the defense industry for 3 years, being battered down by managers and surrounded by depressed members of staff constantly worried about their jobs. Ended up walking out after being moved to a new location having to do 60 miles a day travelling for no extra money. i have never worked in a so disorganized backward $hitwhole in all my life. 3 years there was the major contributor to basically giving up on life, personal life was not doing great either really. so both where major contributors to chucking the towel in. 

luckily i had lots of savings so thought i would turn my hand to creaming a bit of money by property developing as i was always good with my hands and can turn it to most things.  perfect i thought buy main home do it up rinse repeat, no one to answer to, do my own hours whatever i wanted really.  may as well make some money out of the ponzi. in practice though trying to buy anywhere is near enough impossible as all the estate agents are crooked and you can`t get a look in unless you pay them off.  Then HTB happend and the rest is history, not looked at anything since 2014 and doubt i will now.  so now i basically have no new skills my savings have become worthless in housing terms, and all that work done years ago has gone up in smoke. 

do i want to work ? not really but what else is the alternative businesses failing everyday, the establishment thinking up new ways to take you for a ride if you do manage to make a few pennies. 

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My suggestion would be to try to get a job similar to your last one. It's what you have the most recent experience doing so is probably the least difficult route back into the job market. Once you've done that for a couple of years you can start sideways stepping towards what you actually want to do.

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  • 407 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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