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Lambie

Dominic Raab - New Housing Minister

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Asok Sharma gets the wooden spoon of Employment and Dominic Raab is the new housing minister - the 7th since 2010.  Strong and Stable indeed.

Will his appointment and the reshuffle from DCLG to DHCLG make any practical difference?

 

Edited by Lambie

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2 hours ago, adarmo said:

Presumably not many people can actually stomach being endlessly wined and dined and having their picture taken with a hard hat on.  Then there's being constantly told what to do/has neen done by the Treasury and No.10.  Finally, the immorality must eventually infiltrate even the most mercenary of a politician's soul.

Edited by Fence

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Housing a priority they say....well going so far as keeping prices high it is. Actually Housing the citizenry in decent conditions is evidently not a priority.

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14 minutes ago, btd1981 said:

If you look along the plane of the chart, the trend is for increasingly little time in the role too.

To be fair, Barwell was voted out. He represented a knife edge constituency where housing was a critical issue (Croydon) and he knew his survival depended on housing.

Shame this guy isn't somewhere quite so marginal in Surrey. Lovely safe blue seat. 

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In Raab's blog about the SDLT budget cut he is clearly thrilled people are saving a measly £5k on a £420k purchase and it's the usual 'property owning democorrupty' Tory line.

Quote

 

By Dominic Raab on December 05, 2017 in Community, Economy, Housing, Youth

On 22 November the Chancellor made a key announcement for first time buyers in the Autumn Budget.

To make housing more affordable, the Chancellor abolished stamp duty for first time buyers on properties up to £300,000, and on the first £300,000 on properties up to £500,000. Nationally, the move will save 80% of first-time buyers from paying stamp duty entirely, and reduce the cost for 95% of this group.

Here in Elmbridge, where the average first time buyer spends £420,000 on a property (according to Land Registry figures), he or she will save £5,000. This is good news for young people looking to get on the housing ladder and a step towards realising the Conservative vision of Britain as a property-owning democracy.

http://dominicraab.com/2017/12/05/stamp-duty-cut-for-first-time-buyers-in-esher-and-walton/

 

 

 

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How the average first time buyer in his constituency spending £420k can be mentioned in the same article as the phrase "this is good news for young people" without the latter being immediately preceded by a phrase such as...

"A massive HPC is coming shortly"

Or

"We are going to built 3 million council houses"

...Is a bit beyond me. He's going to turn out to be another clueless careerist wankpuffin of a Tory isn't he?

Edited by disenfranchised

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28 minutes ago, Timak said:

His only mention of housing in his time as an MP was to argue against increased taxes on expensive houses.

He was also campaigning for no SDLT on houses up to £500,000 in 2014, so no wonder he was pleased with the £300,000

Quote

 

Conservatives should grasp the nettle. As well as ruling out a mansion tax, we should make clear our intention to overhaul stamp duty – scrapping it for homes under £500,000

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/11072733/Dominic-Raab-scrap-stamp-duty-on-homes-under-500000.html

 

 

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Housing ministers are essentially powerless spokesmen. On the private sector side, house prices are driven by the supply of mortgage credit and government loans (e.g. HTB) which are both Treasury responsibilities. On the public sector side, only the PM and the Treasury have the power to decide on and fund a mass council house building programme. So what's left for the housing minister to do? Alok Sharma spent his tenure going around listening to tenants and nodding his head.

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5 hours ago, Spirit said:

I happen to agree with him on that, although not for the same reason (to prevent huge & irreversible windfall gains for private greenbelt landowners that come with rezoning, before better land tax measures are in place. Not due to nimbyness).

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4 hours ago, Dorkins said:

Housing ministers are essentially powerless spokesmen. On the private sector side, house prices are driven by the supply of mortgage credit and government loans (e.g. HTB) which are both Treasury responsibilities. On the public sector side, only the PM and the Treasury have the power to decide on and fund a mass council house building programme. So what's left for the housing minister to do? Alok Sharma spent his tenure going around listening to tenants and nodding his head.

He has the power to do something about tenant security, rented sector standards, landlord registration, leasehold scandals, new-build standards (bring back Parker Morris?), beds-in-sheds, letting agencies...

He won't, though.

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He's another conservative HPI stooge, who is so far out of touch with the current situation its not even funny. If he thinks £420k is an acceptable level for FTB average house price, then he is an idiot ...I wonder what it was when he bought a house?

Oh and he also didn't support the petition which Generation Rent created a couple of years ago on banning letting fees, his response is below, don't expect any HPC measures from this fool! 

Good afternoon,

Thank you for contacting me about letting agent fees. I appreciate your concerns.
The government is committed to promoting a strong and thriving professional rented sector where tenants enjoy decent standards and receive a service that represents value for money.
The government does not believe that a blanket ban or cap on letting agent fees is the answer to tackling the rogue letting agents who exploit their customers by imposing inflated fees for their services. The government is committed to promoting a strong and thriving professional rented sector where tenants enjoy decent standards and receive a service that represents value for money. The evidence from Scotland, where letting agent fees have been banned, suggests the ban has led to higher rents. 
The vast majority of letting agents provide a good service to tenants and landlords, and most fees charged reflect genuine business costs. However, the government has taken action to ensure full transparency of fees. Since 2015, letting agents and property managers have been required to display a full tariff of their fees prominently in their offices and on their websites, with a fine of up to £5,000 if they fail to comply. Such transparency will help to deter double charging by letting agents and enable both tenants and landlords to shop around, encouraging agents to offer competitive fees.

The government is currently reviewing whether to make client money protection mandatory for lettings agents and is committed to a wider review later this year to investigate the effectiveness of transparency measures and will consider whether more action needs to be taken. I hope this provides you with a degree of reassurance. I am afraid I do not, generally, sign EDM’s as they are expensive to administer and achieve little in practice.

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45 minutes ago, Smiley George said:

He's another conservative HPI stooge, who is so far out of touch with the current situation its not even funny. If he thinks £420k is an acceptable level for FTB average house price, then he is an idiot ...I wonder what it was when he bought a house?

Oh and he also didn't support the petition which Generation Rent created a couple of years ago on banning letting fees, his response is below, don't expect any HPC measures from this fool! 

Good afternoon,

Thank you for contacting me about letting agent fees. I appreciate your concerns.
The government is committed to promoting a strong and thriving professional rented sector where tenants enjoy decent standards and receive a service that represents value for money.
The government does not believe that a blanket ban or cap on letting agent fees is the answer to tackling the rogue letting agents who exploit their customers by imposing inflated fees for their services. The government is committed to promoting a strong and thriving professional rented sector where tenants enjoy decent standards and receive a service that represents value for money. The evidence from Scotland, where letting agent fees have been banned, suggests the ban has led to higher rents. 
The vast majority of letting agents provide a good service to tenants and landlords, and most fees charged reflect genuine business costs. However, the government has taken action to ensure full transparency of fees. Since 2015, letting agents and property managers have been required to display a full tariff of their fees prominently in their offices and on their websites, with a fine of up to £5,000 if they fail to comply. Such transparency will help to deter double charging by letting agents and enable both tenants and landlords to shop around, encouraging agents to offer competitive fees.

The government is currently reviewing whether to make client money protection mandatory for lettings agents and is committed to a wider review later this year to investigate the effectiveness of transparency measures and will consider whether more action needs to be taken. I hope this provides you with a degree of reassurance. I am afraid I do not, generally, sign EDM’s as they are expensive to administer and achieve little in practice.

Infact people received similar response from then housing minister, Gavin Barewell just before the letting fees ban was announced. It doesn't matter how the minister think and view the current housing crisis. The more resistance for an HPC from them will have negative effect in thier own career. Joe public is coming to senses and their political career is hanging on balance. For example his predecessor Alok Sharma another NIMBY like Raab may not retain his safe Tory seat(Reading West) as it stands today. "Forever HPI" engraved on the walls of Westminster is starts to fade away for the Tory politicians eyes.

Edited by hi5lo5

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On 1/9/2018 at 1:18 PM, Lambie said:

an interesting chart of housing minister tenures - from https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/blog/cabinet-reshuffle-live-blog-january-2018  Not exactly a brief ministers tend to get their teeth into.

Link includes some thoughts from previous housing ministers John Healey and Mark Prisk

image.png.f6e8bd3bd388da6ffeb774470bb77b56.png

 

 

Prescott shouldn't get off scot free - he doesn't seem to get a mention in the chart above.

Quote

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Prescott

 In July 2001 an Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) was created to administer the areas remaining under his responsibility. This was originally part of the Cabinet Office, but became a department in its own right in May 2002, when it absorbed some of the responsibilities of the former Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions. The ODPM had responsibility for local and regional government, housing, communities and the fire service.

....

Housing

A rising number of households (especially in the south-east) were putting added pressure on housing during Prescott's tenure as the minister responsible. 

 

 

Edited by billybong

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