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Guardian Article - I thought being a homeowner would solve all my woes – but it’s a bigger pain than renting

 

Following on from the "articles" paid for by Lloyds Bank to tell you how wonderful and hip and trendy it is to be "co-living" in "microflats" at "market rates", the decent, honourable Guardian "news" paper continues to look out for ordinary people by making sure you come to understand that home ownership is not for you. In particular it makes sure to get it through to millennials how dumb and disgusting they are.

"As one of the gilded few who have managed to buy a house", the generous, honourable author of the article, Stuart Heritage, is looking out for your interests, and imparts such gems that include:

- You may end up "selling an organ to fix the boiler"

- Long fearmongering list of what might go wrong. " Washing machine... Floorboard rot... Entire flat suddenly fills to bursting point with ladybirds (really)... guttering, chimney pointing, roof, con men coming to the door and separating you from your money, oh and of course the boiler.

- "Smashing the savings jar that’s supposed to see me through to retirement"

- "I’ll never recoup the money I’m hurling at the place just to keep it upright"

- Two paras about "The worst thing about millennials"

 

And to finish off:

"So, millennials, stop complaining. You might not own a house, but I promise you aren’t missing out on much."

 

I was not able to locate the part of the article stating that, given the above, the author is selling his home and going back to renting.

 

I wonder how many other Guardian authors have decided to become part of the "gilded few" even though it is so clearly against their interests to do so. I wonder.

The Guardian. That wonderful socially responsible paper that is looking out for the people.

Edited by AdamoMucci

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33 minutes ago, AdamoMucci said:

Guardian Article - I thought being a homeowner would solve all my woes – but it’s a bigger pain than renting

 

Following on from the "articles" paid for by Lloyds Bank to tell you how wonderful and hip and trendy it is to be "co-living" in "microflats" at "market rates", the decent, honourable Guardian "news" paper continues to look out for ordinary people by making sure you come to understand that home ownership is not for you. In particular it makes sure to get it through to millennials how dumb and disgusting they are.

"As one of the gilded few who have managed to buy a house", the generous, honourable author of the article, Stuart Heritage, is looking out for your interests, and imparts such gems that include:

- You may end up "selling an organ to fix the boiler"

- Long fearmongering list of what might go wrong. " Washing machine... Floorboard rot... Entire flat suddenly fills to bursting point with ladybirds (really)... guttering, chimney pointing, roof, con men coming to the door and separating you from your money, oh and of course the boiler.

- "Smashing the savings jar that’s supposed to see me through to retirement"

- "I’ll never recoup the money I’m hurling at the place just to keep it upright"

- Two paras about "The worst thing about millennials"

 

And to finish off:

"So, millennials, stop complaining. You might not own a house, but I promise you aren’t missing out on much."

 

I was not able to locate the part of the article stating that, given the above, the author is selling his home and going back to renting.

 

I wonder how many other Guardian authors have decided to become part of the "gilded few" even though it is so clearly against their interests to do so. I wonder.

The Guardian. That wonderful socially responsible paper that is looking out for the people.

I never realised that Blairite was an actual thing. Then I read The GaUrdian.

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2 hours ago, AdamoMucci said:

Guardian Article - I thought being a homeowner would solve all my woes – but it’s a bigger pain than renting

 

Following on from the "articles" paid for by Lloyds Bank to tell you how wonderful and hip and trendy it is to be "co-living" in "microflats" at "market rates", the decent, honourable Guardian "news" paper continues to look out for ordinary people by making sure you come to understand that home ownership is not for you. In particular it makes sure to get it through to millennials how dumb and disgusting they are.

"As one of the gilded few who have managed to buy a house", the generous, honourable author of the article, Stuart Heritage, is looking out for your interests, and imparts such gems that include:

- You may end up "selling an organ to fix the boiler"

- Long fearmongering list of what might go wrong. " Washing machine... Floorboard rot... Entire flat suddenly fills to bursting point with ladybirds (really)... guttering, chimney pointing, roof, con men coming to the door and separating you from your money, oh and of course the boiler.

- "Smashing the savings jar that’s supposed to see me through to retirement"

- "I’ll never recoup the money I’m hurling at the place just to keep it upright"

- Two paras about "The worst thing about millennials"

 

And to finish off:

"So, millennials, stop complaining. You might not own a house, but I promise you aren’t missing out on much."

 

I was not able to locate the part of the article stating that, given the above, the author is selling his home and going back to renting.

 

I wonder how many other Guardian authors have decided to become part of the "gilded few" even though it is so clearly against their interests to do so. I wonder.

The Guardian. That wonderful socially responsible paper that is looking out for the people.

i would of finished it off by saying renting is horrible the uk is horrible the employers are horrible immigrants don`t bother to come here renters stay with your parents potential buyers stay with your parents current renters move back to your parents.

 

lets see how the VI`s like that. i am sure they wont mind 

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15 hours ago, AdamoMucci said:

I was not able to locate the part of the article stating that, given the above, the author is selling his home and going back to renting.

Perhaps he's in negative equity and can't sell...I hope so.

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3 minutes ago, Wayward said:

Perhaps he's in negative equity and can't sell...I hope so.

Perhaps he's in negative equity, but has savings to cover the shortfall but still no one will buy it off him.

 

 

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Those articles stir so much in me... I can hardly express the amount of anger it inspires me. 

To paraphrase Venger, this guy who bought at peak price needs to suffer just because he supported that Ponzi

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I know a couple of kids late 20s who got married and now living with her parents. Naturally it's not ideal so they were looking for somewhere else. Both have separately rented before and not keen to go back to misery of dealing with LLs and letting agents. All unsurprising so far. Which just leaves buying somewhere and yesterday they put an offer in which was accepted. It was below asking and a lot below original asking ( listing was reduced.) Reason for sale was one of the 4Ds otherwise it sounds like seller would have held out for full asking.  Kids pleased but the bottom line a megafuklot of money in SE. 

I don't know the kids that well but have been gently suggesting they think carefully, is it really good idea etc. No impact. I think it's wrong decision but can see pressure which made them do it, and lack of visibility (to them) of the likely hazard. Both smart and clever in their fields of expertise but about macroeconomics of debt and long-term property trends just clueless (IMO.) Cannot accept any portrayal of them and people like them as fully aware making choices as greedy ponzi supporters etc. etc. 

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1 hour ago, Freki said:

Those articles stir so much in me... I can hardly express the amount of anger it inspires me. 

To paraphrase Venger, this guy who bought at peak price needs to suffer just because he supported that Ponzi

Wouldn't put it quite that way, but IF ever any HPC, I won't be accepting any future sob-story for him as one of the 'gilded few' buyers of recent times; "the greatest sympathy / just wanted a home / didn't know what he was doing "

And he knows the risks for his 'house investment to his 70s'... 

Quote

But when your boiler goes in your own home, you’ll seriously consider harvesting your organs on the black market to pay for it. And when there’s a housing crash, which may well come soon, you’ll be double buggered.

So if it ever happens, he won't need the greatest sympathy.

Also sounds like he was gulled by door-knocking worker into one of the oldest cons about chimneys and roof-tiles.  Got the guy's price down to £1,000 ?   Is he for real there or just making it up for it's a stupid thing to do?

...Actually it was Gullands Solicitors (I checked them out in 2010-11 ish AFTER Fergus/Judith made a big play about instructing local solicitor rather than City solicitor, to sell their 100s of £million 'portfolio') - who had a good blog at the time.   Something we will always keep in mind if ever buying a house (asking to see some evidence they are insured) - but no chance just allowing someone who knocks on the door to begin works.

0oLJD1q.jpg

 

Edited by Venger

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1 hour ago, Funn3r said:

I know a couple of kids late 20s who got married and now living with her parents. Naturally it's not ideal so they were looking for somewhere else. Both have separately rented before and not keen to go back to misery of dealing with LLs and letting agents. All unsurprising so far. Which just leaves buying somewhere and yesterday they put an offer in which was accepted. It was below asking and a lot below original asking ( listing was reduced.) Reason for sale was one of the 4Ds otherwise it sounds like seller would have held out for full asking.  Kids pleased but the bottom line a megafuklot of money in SE. 

I don't know the kids that well but have been gently suggesting they think carefully, is it really good idea etc. No impact. I think it's wrong decision but can see pressure which made them do it, and lack of visibility (to them) of the likely hazard. Both smart and clever in their fields of expertise but about macroeconomics of debt and long-term property trends just clueless (IMO.) Cannot accept any portrayal of them and people like them as fully aware making choices as greedy ponzi supporters etc. etc. 

That`s the sad thing about the housing market all the intelligence in the world and it boils down to just needing somewhere to live which can be exploited just by greed.  life success has been turned into luck not intelligence.  

why are they buying now if no genuine need ? ideas of more HPI missing the boat ?

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Funny thing is my parents have owned for decades. Never heard them once complain about all this money they are " hurling at the place just to keep it upright".

 

Stop complaining millennials!

Decent, honourable Guardian journalists will own property so you don't have to. Looking out for you. On the side of ordinary people.

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10 minutes ago, AdamoMucci said:

Funny thing is my parents have owned for decades. Never heard them once complain about all this money they are " hurling at the place just to keep it upright".

 

Stop complaining millennials!

Decent, honourable Guardian journalists will own property so you don't have to. Looking out for you. On the side of ordinary people.

My dad on the other hand never stops complaining, but then he's a bit like that. 

Owning is expensive and you're on the hook for maintenance etc... no two ways about it. But just having a small boiler in a flat replaced is roughly £1,200- and it should last you a decade. Tenner a month there. If you're fairly handy you can install everything on the 'wet end' yourself and just have HETAS boy come around and connect it. 

I would say owning is expensive but in the long run renting is expensiver.

Agree with the sentiment of this though. The Guardian is a fricking condescending joke. I only read it for the headlines because it's not behind a paywall. Once they burn through their trust cash they're done. 

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2 hours ago, longgone said:

That`s the sad thing about the housing market all the intelligence in the world and it boils down to just needing somewhere to live which can be exploited just by greed.  life success has been turned into luck not intelligence.  

why are they buying now if no genuine need ? ideas of more HPI missing the boat ?

When I was at school there was a boy who used to bully the smaller kids, including me who he used to have a particular go at. I just put up with it as you did in those days because there was "nothing I could do." One day he started on me in the playground but for some reason the other children gathered round and started cheering me on, I should fight back, give him one, all that. So because they were all telling me to I did fight back and gave him back his own treatment no problem at all which of course felt quite good. Except he dissolved into tears and I had a brief glimpse into someone who was even more unhappy than me, and that was what stayed with me afterwards not a gloat about my victory. The point is I was not physically weaker than him and I could have fought back at any time but didn't do so until I was explicitly permitted and instructed to by my peers whom I respected.

Going back to my house-purchasing young friends; they are addressing a problem not choosing a speculative opportunity. You say "if no genuine need" but really, young shag-crazy newly-weds living with one set of parents, come on, they do think they have a genuine need. And going back to my bullying story they have their entire extended family,  probably all their friends, and the loathsome MSM all telling them what a great idea it is to buy a house. "You can't go wrong with bricks and mortar." "Have to get on the ladder." "Renting is dead money." "Do it now." Human beings don't have freedom of choice they do what they are made to do by their environment.

Edited by Funn3r
Missed a comma

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What a heart-moving story - glimpse of the inner innocence of the bully child - and the one who required peers to fight back.

I fight.  Renting is the other option.  We can all see the asking prices., and I have had to set aside the HPIers in my circle  (nowadays it's more "Still renting? - vs their mad-gainz).

Adults do have freedom (it's my main freedom - not to buy at dangerously high price), but it's forever plight/excuses for those who buy.... 2010 same stories, and one buyer seen home he bought in 2010 for £200,000 now worth £500,000 - way ahead of renters.  Human shield it in case prices fall - how many years you owned your house for now funn3r?

Quote

 

~ It's the banks who do the bad lending.  Would you blame a child for eating a whole packet of sweets that its parent has given it?

~ When they start offering mortgages to children you'll have an argument.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Funn3r said:

 

Going back to my house-purchasing young friends; they are addressing a problem not choosing a speculative opportunity. You say "if no genuine need" but really young shag-crazy newly-weds living with one set of parents, come on, they do think they have a genuine need. 

peer pressure does have an influence i agree, but the bigger picture needs to be looked at rather than what everyone else is saying and their hormones. 

Maybe they are right who knows with the shower of Sh*t system we have now. personally i think if they are not going up in value why rush. any gains have already been lost. hormones aside. 

i found public humiliation worked well with bullies no violence needed. ;)

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Sure thing they are influenced by this country ethos. The bottom line is, should they be bailed out when it turns sour.

If I were to buy in this market, it would be on the back that I know if it turns sour, I can hold my own. I have the same reasoning as Adarmo on this one. 

I personally think the SE is out of touch with reality and defying gravity will last as long as this cycle lasts. So even if I was give 500k I would not put that money here, I would feel robbed.

Bottom line, I have no sympathy for the author. And I agree Venger, that I was a bit spiteful when you are not, apologies.

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10 minutes ago, Venger said:

What a heart-moving story - glimpse of the inner innocence of the bully child - and the one who required peers to fight back.

I fight.  Renting is the other option.  We can all see the asking prices., and I have had to set aside the HPIers in my circle  (nowadays it's more "Still renting? - vs their mad-gainz).

Adults do have freedom (it's my main freedom - not to buy at dangerously high price), but it's forever plight/excuses for those who buy.... 2010 same stories, and one buyer seen home he bought in 2010 for £200,000 now worth £500,000 - way ahead of renters.  Human shield it in case prices fall - how many years you owned your house for now funn3r?

 

Venger of course I knew you would swoop in even as my fingers moved over the keyboard and we will just have to agree to disagree. I hope you are not losing focus because usually you're laser-like in digging up old posts and I am sure I told you in the past I do not own a house and rent a 1-bed flat.

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1 minute ago, Freki said:

Sure thing they are influenced by this country ethos. The bottom line is, should they be bailed out when it turns sour.

If I were to buy in this market, it would be on the back that I know if it turns sour, I can hold my own. I have the same reasoning as Adarmo on this one. 

I personally think the SE is out of touch with reality and defying gravity will last as long as this cycle lasts. So even if I was give 500k I would not put that money here, I would feel robbed.

Bottom line, I have no sympathy for the author. And I agree Venger, that I was a bit spiteful when you are not, apologies.

Adarmo doubts prices can fall much and asks what are the triggers.

You weren't spiteful Freki - just blunt on the matter than buyers should be on their own for their market choices (if prices fall)...I have compared renting to suffering in the past as well, and maybe I also have posted that owners should 'suffer' any falls in the past as well.

It's suffering but in a housing/money/value context - not suffering as in what some people in life forced endure - still very very important mind, in housing financialisation.

And plenty of vested-interests (Be Careful What You Wish For - article) project house values falling as 'suffering' (for the owners) - as they tell us to hope for wage-inflation to protect the latest buyers (and value of their own homes bought decades ago).

If the journo's house should fall in value (if) - then that's on him, and he recognises that.   He wanted to buy and he bought (END OF).  I don't know his earnings, any inheritance, or maybe what his plumber Dad may have bomad-ed him for.  A home with chimneys... a house?  His choice.  As was his plight-story of apparently paying someone £1,000 who knocked on door to tell him something about his chimney.  To stop choice/freedom/risks in life, is to take away freedom imo.

If we can't have people free to make market choices then what?  A control society?  Superior Knowledge powers that be take command because we are too foolish to be able to think for ourselves?  

Quote

 

Neverwhere: 

More people are already suffering, because of the current dislocation between house prices and wages, than will possibly suffer in a HPC.

People who own their homes outright won't suffer.

People who have borrowed sensibly in relation to their household incomes and savings buffers won't suffer.

The only people who might possibly suffer are those who have acted speculatively, whether by holding multiple properties or by borrowing unsustainably for their main residences in order to maximise their stake in the housing market.

This relatively small cohort who might possibly suffer are also the ones who are most likely to have been driving the bubble and causing the suffering of those who are, as a result, priced out and unable to own homes of their own without borrowing in a similarly reckless manner.

In so doing this relatively small cohort who might possibly suffer have ultimately caused this possibility themselves. Not only in choosing their own personal exposure to the housing market, but also in the aggregate effect of their actions on house prices. It is the build up over the course of the boom that causes the bust.

The boom is the bad times. The bust is just the bad times coming to an end.

This relatively small cohort who might possibly suffer are also, currently, not suffering. In fact they are enjoying the fruits of their speculation as we speak, and many of them have been doing so for quite some time now, and may well continue to do so even in the event of a HPC, if they play their cards right.

(Venger) The fact that you are more concerned about people who are actually suffering right now as a consequences of the actions of others than you are about people who are currently very well off in relative terms but might possibly suffer at some point in the future as a consequence of their own actions, makes you a poster to admire in my opinion.

Not only moral, and honourable, but with the intelligence to understand the wider social consequences of the housing market and not have them obscured by individuals who would be put - or put themselves - before the quality of life of those who are already less well off than them.

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Funn3r said:

Venger of course I knew you would swoop in even as my fingers moved over the keyboard and we will just have to agree to disagree. I hope you are not losing focus because usually you're laser-like in digging up old posts and I am sure I told you in the past I do not own a house and rent a 1-bed flat.

Have been having those 'focus' concerns just lately (memory slipping). 

We can all see the asking prices, and we all have to make choices in how to procure housing.

It's worked out so well vs renting for many buyers during the 'media/advertising/parents/hype' excuses for buyers of many years - vs those of us on renting side of things.

We can't have a market with no downside to paying too much.  They had option to rent to get it on.  Many people would like to own vs rent. 

Renters are not there to just think of all the owners who outbid them (10 years younger), and cast them as innocents (in event of HPC).  I may buy soon as it's just one long 'sympathy for owners' excuse fest.   Had opportunity to last year and regret not buying (non HPI hot area).  

What do you think the answer is Funn3r?   Ever younger and younger buyers seen get HPI++++ vs our continued rent, and ever more priced out by HPI+++++.

Quote

The Culture - the real Culture, the wily ones, not these semi-mystical Elenchers with their miserable hankering to be somebody else - had been known to give whole Affronter fleets the run-around for several months with not dissimilar enticements and subterfuges, keeping them occupied, seemingly on the track of some wildly promising prey which turned out to be nothing at all, or a Culture ship with some ridiculous but earnestly argued excuse - Excession

 

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But poor Guardian journalists don't get paid so they have to rely on HPI and selling overpriced converted Victorian terraces to each other: It even says so at the bottom of the page:

… we have a small favour to ask. More milennials are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many property ramping organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, avocado toast and chianti to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.

If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure. For as little as £1, you can support the Guardian – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.

Edited by Pindar

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17 hours ago, Funn3r said:

Human beings don't have freedom of choice they do what they are made to do by their environment.

To a point. Most people are NPCs, but it doesn't absolve going with the crowd. 

Historically, the ones who actually change things are the ones who can at least partially think and act for themselves.

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