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Bingley Bloke

Government Stupidity Fuelling Housing Bubble And Other Problems

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Has anyone else noticed how many of the problems that blight the country today; overpriced housing, road congestion, carbon emmissions, teacher shortages and excessive class sizes, hospital waiting lists and bed and nurse shortages, can be attributed to the increasing number of people populating the country, and would all be eased if there were less people? Yet the government presses on with it's 'handouts for breeders' initiatives such as £250 prizes for popping sprogs, tax credits, etc. Am I the only one that has noticed?

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Has anyone else noticed how many of the problems that blight the country today; overpriced housing, road congestion, carbon emmissions, teacher shortages and excessive class sizes, hospital waiting lists and bed and nurse shortages, can be attributed to the increasing number of people populating the country, and would all be eased if there were less people? Yet the government presses on with it's 'handouts for breeders' initiatives such as £250 prizes for popping sprogs, tax credits, etc. Am I the only one that has noticed?

Have you looked at the demographics of the uk recently? The birth rate has been low for the last 30 years and plumbed a new depth about 4 years ago.

frugalista

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Have you looked at the demographics of the uk recently? The birth rate has been low for the last 30 years and plumbed a new depth about 4 years ago.

frugalista

If the birth rate is priming the population for a fall then won't these problems just sort themselves out without us all having to worry so much? And if so, why are the government trying to counter the positive effects of this with the things I mentioned?

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Has anyone else noticed how many of the problems that blight the country today; overpriced housing, road congestion, carbon emmissions, teacher shortages and excessive class sizes, hospital waiting lists and bed and nurse shortages, can be attributed to the increasing number of people populating the country, and would all be eased if there were less people? Yet the government presses on with it's 'handouts for breeders' initiatives such as £250 prizes for popping sprogs, tax credits, etc. Am I the only one that has noticed?

No--Gordon has noticed and that's why he calls the British economy a "miracle." It was, until quite recently, the most successful something for nothing economy in the world.

Edited by Realistbear

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If the birth rate is priming the population for a fall then won't these problems just sort themselves out without us all having to worry so much?

Yes and no. House prices are likely to come down as there will be fewer 35-45 year olds around to compete for the purchase of their main family home. On the other hand, healthcare and pensions could be stretched further still as the demographic bulge moves up into their 50s, 60s and 70s.

And if so, why are the government trying to counter the positive effects of this with the things I mentioned?

The baby bond is hardly a prize to the parents of the child. It cannot be touched until the child is 18 and then it goes to the child. Do you think £250 is a lot of money? It is only 14 weeks' child benefit (CB is £17.45 per week for the eldest child in 2005/6).

As for working families tax credit, SureStart etc. I think this is targeted at child poverty rather than raising the birth rate, although it might have a slight effect I suppose. Many studies have shown that a few simple benefits in the very early years makes a huge difference to later education levels, deliquency etc. so its money well spent IMHO.

frugalista

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Has anyone else noticed how many of the problems that blight the country today; overpriced housing, road congestion, carbon emmissions, teacher shortages and excessive class sizes, hospital waiting lists and bed and nurse shortages, can be attributed to the increasing number of people populating the country, and would all be eased if there were less people? Yet the government presses on with it's 'handouts for breeders' initiatives such as £250 prizes for popping sprogs, tax credits, etc. Am I the only one that has noticed?

So if we go back to the population levels of 50, 100, 200, 400, 500, 1000 years ago we will all return to some kind of eden will we? Increasing population has gone hand in hand with an increase in life expectancy, literacy and social provision for the last 10000 years, why should it stop now? Different this time perhaps?

Edited by jellybean

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So if we go back to the population levels of 50, 100, 200, 400, 500, 1000 years ago we will all return to some kind of eden will we? Increasing population has gone hand in hand with an increase in life expectancy, literacy and social provision for the last 10000 years, why should it stop now? Different this time perhaps?

Previously it has gone hand in hand with infrastructure improvements. In the last 10-15 years, hardly any changes have been made, if anything they have been reduced.

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Previously it has gone hand in hand with infrastructure improvements. In the last 10-15 years, hardly any changes have been made, if anything they have been reduced.

So no new road's, hospitals, houses or schools have been built then? Half the country looks like a building site to me.

Edited by jellybean

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Teacher shortage is a myth - I work in education and the country is awash with GTP (graduate training prog) and GTTR non-qual'd teachers looking for a few jpbs. The 'shortage' is a gov manipulation just like the fake 'undersupply' of houses. It gives head teachers an endless supply of £13,000 p/a GTP teachers on probation who are sent packing at the end of the last summer term (before they have to be paid full rate) to make way for another learner.

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Teacher shortage is a myth - I work in education and the country is awash with GTP (graduate training prog) and GTTR non-qual'd teachers looking for a few jpbs. The 'shortage' is a gov manipulation just like the fake 'undersupply' of houses. It gives head teachers an endless supply of £13,000 p/a GTP teachers on probation who are sent packing at the end of the last summer term (before they have to be paid full rate) to make way for another learner.

I've noticed that its been a few years since we heard about shortages of teachers and applicants for teacher training. A useful barometer for the economy?

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Do you think £250 is a lot of money?

Multiplied by the number of babies born, yes.

As for working families tax credit, SureStart etc. I think this is targeted at child poverty

It would be all well and good if it was administered purely for that effect, but there are couples earning more than £50K who can claim it! Surely it should be distributed on the grounds of need?

I'm sure people don't have babies to 'get the money' but someone who wants to have a baby is more likely to if they know they can claim money to ease the expense. Look at it this way, I've been very careful with my central heating use this winter because of the shocking gas bill I had last February and the fact that the price has risen even more since. If the government told me I'd receive a 'low earner's winter heating allowance' I'd probably turn the heating on more liberally, and that's what I'm getting at – people who might think twice about doing something if they didn't get help from the government will more be likely to go ahead and do it if they know it will be subsidised. Personally I think it's irresponsible for the government to encourage an increase in births when there are problems associated with overpopulation, even if statistics about birth rates suggest that it isn't reproduction, which would be exacerbated by an increase in births.

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Teacher shortage is a myth - I work in education and the country is awash with GTP (graduate training prog) and GTTR non-qual'd teachers looking for a few jpbs. The 'shortage' is a gov manipulation just like the fake 'undersupply' of houses. It gives head teachers an endless supply of £13,000 p/a GTP teachers on probation who are sent packing at the end of the last summer term (before they have to be paid full rate) to make way for another learner.

An interesting post... so are you saying that the government is speading the rumour that there is a shortage of teachers in order to encourage many more people to train for the role in order to drive wages down (and thus their overall wage bill)? I read a BBC article a while back that there is an oversupply of doctors & many cannot find a job after graduating..

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If the birth rate is priming the population for a fall then won't these problems just sort themselves out without us all having to worry so much? And if so, why are the government trying to counter the positive effects of this with the things I mentioned?

What you have to bear in mind is who is breading..

I in no way think that it is not everyones right to have children..

Personally I think the ability to pay yourself should come into it.. a little more in some cases..

But could everyone here look around at those who are having kids...

does it represent a desirable cross section of the country..

or are some failing to

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The problem isn't so much population but 50 years of planning constraints that have created an artificial shortage of a plentiful resource, 90% of the country lives on 10% of the land and all our supporting infrastructure (including roads) accounts for less than an additional 10%.

If you try and build even a modest housing development in this country or god forbid, a new bypass, you will encounter howls of opposition from a whole raft of organisations largely representing middleclass deep greens or nimby's who were surprisingly silent to the very developments they now live in and bought for very little all those decades ago. But god strike down other people who have the audacity to want a home, which seemingly includes their own children.

Our whole establishment is packed full of the same generation of boomers backed up by countless organisations who oppose any sort of development of any type. There's English Heritage, National Trust, FoE, CPRE, Transport 2000, Prince Charles (!), even the Ramblers Assocations (does Van Hoogstraten have a point?). The 'New Towns Commission' has yielded too, they've renamed themselves to English Parternships and now concern themselves with redevelopment of innercity industrial areas where nobody wants to live.

Establishment architects hold the same view, Lord Rogers envisions people living in high rise urban blocks, despite the fact he likes to live in two big houses knocked into one in Chelsea (planned by Sir Christopher Wren, of course).

Look at the opposition, who actually speaks for those interested in providing decent livable housing for people, you know, housing without density targets that are deemed cruel if applied to cattle and housing with extraordinary things like gardens or a parking space for a car. Or housing that is built on something other than old polluted brown field sites that are contaminated with heavy metals and oil, not to mention next to a motorway junction.

Aside from 'Shelter', who are understandably focused on the plight low income people or squatters, nobody actually speaks for those seeking livable housing.

Today we're facing a rerun of all the same policies that failed in the 60's, we are now in the process of building the slums of tomorrow. Try anything new and you will be accused of concreting over the countryside, any government will balls would say "yes we are! there's plenty of it and there will be plenty left!".

If you claim to be a modern country but neglect to build or renew basic infrastructure for over 40 years this is what happens!

Edited by BuyingBear

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An interesting post... so are you saying that the government is speading the rumour that there is a shortage of teachers in order to encourage many more people to train for the role in order to drive wages down (and thus their overall wage bill)? I read a BBC article a while back that there is an oversupply of doctors & many cannot find a job after graduating..

There are big shortages in certain areas/subjects. Try and find a Science, Maths or ICT teacher for an inner city school and you're likely to get no applicants. There are massive shortages of Headteachers too, my last school advertised 4 times and couldn't get any applicants. We advertised for a Head of Maths (twice). No takers.

There are no shortages in humanities subjects or Primary schools, but the government are still packing them in on the PGCE courses.

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The problem isn't so much population but 50 years of planning constraints that have created an artificial shortage of a plentiful resource, 90% of the country lives on 10% of the land and all our supporting infrastructure (including roads) accounts for less than an additional 10%.

If you try and build even a modest housing development in this country or god forbid, a new bypass, you will encounter howls of opposition from a whole raft of organisations largely representing middleclass deep greens or nimby's who were surprisingly silent to the very developments they now live in and bought for very little all those decades ago. But god strike down other people who have the audacity to want a home, which seemingly includes their own children.

Our whole establishment is packed full of the same generation of boomers backed up by countless organisations who oppose any sort of development of any type. There's English Heritage, National Trust, FoE, CPRE, Transport 2000, Prince Charles (!), even the Ramblers Assocations (does Van Hoogstraten have a point?). The 'New Towns Commission' has yielded too, they've renamed themselves to English Parternships and now concern themselves with redevelopment of innercity industrial areas where nobody wants to live.

Establishment architects hold the same view, Lord Rogers envisions people living in high rise urban blocks, despite the fact he likes to live in two big houses knocked into one in Chelsea (planned by Sir Christopher Wren, of course).

Look at the opposition, who actually speaks for those interested in providing decent livable housing for people, you know, housing without density targets that are deemed cruel if applied to cattle and housing with extraordinary things like gardens or a parking space for a car. Or housing that is built on something other than old polluted brown field sites that are contaminated with heavy metals and oil, not to mention next to a motorway junction.

Aside from 'Shelter', who are understandably focused on the plight low income people or squatters, nobody actually speaks for those seeking livable housing.

Today we're facing a rerun of all the same policies that failed in the 60's, we are now in the process of building the slums of tomorrow. Try anything new and you will be accused of concreting over the countryside, any government will balls would say "yes we are! there's plenty of it and there will be plenty left!".

If you claim to be a modern country but neglect to build or renew basic infrastructure for over 40 years this is what happens!

Nice one, one of the best posts I've seen on this site!

My feelings on this issue is that the establishment in the UK (media, politicians and civil service) concentrate on popularising economic growth at any cost, which tends to benefit themselves and the rest of the upper middle class at the expense of those 'beneath' them. They could, rather than follow the growth at any social cost path, aim for an improvement in quality of life for the population as a whole but, of course, that is unlikely to happen!

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The problem isn't so much population but 50 years of planning constraints that have created an artificial shortage of a plentiful resource, 90% of the country lives on 10% of the land and all our supporting infrastructure (including roads) accounts for less than an additional 10%.

If you try and build even a modest housing development in this country or god forbid, a new bypass, you will encounter howls of opposition from a whole raft of organisations largely representing middleclass deep greens or nimby's who were surprisingly silent to the very developments they now live in and bought for very little all those decades ago. But god strike down other people who have the audacity to want a home, which seemingly includes their own children.

Our whole establishment is packed full of the same generation of boomers backed up by countless organisations who oppose any sort of development of any type. There's English Heritage, National Trust, FoE, CPRE, Transport 2000, Prince Charles (!), even the Ramblers Assocations (does Van Hoogstraten have a point?). The 'New Towns Commission' has yielded too, they've renamed themselves to English Parternships and now concern themselves with redevelopment of innercity industrial areas where nobody wants to live.

Establishment architects hold the same view, Lord Rogers envisions people living in high rise urban blocks, despite the fact he likes to live in two big houses knocked into one in Chelsea (planned by Sir Christopher Wren, of course).

Look at the opposition, who actually speaks for those interested in providing decent livable housing for people, you know, housing without density targets that are deemed cruel if applied to cattle and housing with extraordinary things like gardens or a parking space for a car. Or housing that is built on something other than old polluted brown field sites that are contaminated with heavy metals and oil, not to mention next to a motorway junction.

Aside from 'Shelter', who are understandably focused on the plight low income people or squatters, nobody actually speaks for those seeking livable housing.

Today we're facing a rerun of all the same policies that failed in the 60's, we are now in the process of building the slums of tomorrow. Try anything new and you will be accused of concreting over the countryside, any government will balls would say "yes we are! there's plenty of it and there will be plenty left!".

If you claim to be a modern country but neglect to build or renew basic infrastructure for over 40 years this is what happens!

Excellent. My view entirely.

I also believe that this demonstrates that the class system is alive and well in this country and still influences much of what happens.

Modern "democracy"? Not from where I sit.

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It's worth pointing out that a new nuclear build is almost impossible under the current planning laws.

Should the government decide to go down this path then they will, nay, must overhaul the current planning comittee system. They will also have to do this in a way that allows new builds to be easier to permit.

So the planning process is likely to come under review, it will be interesting to see how far any reforms go.

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Has anyone else noticed how many of the problems that blight the country today; overpriced housing, road congestion, carbon emmissions, teacher shortages and excessive class sizes, hospital waiting lists and bed and nurse shortages, can be attributed to the increasing number of people populating the country, and would all be eased if there were less people? Yet the government presses on with it's 'handouts for breeders' initiatives such as £250 prizes for popping sprogs, tax credits, etc. Am I the only one that has noticed?

Interestingly, overall we don't have teacher shortages. There are many, many new teachers who are unable to get jobs and the areas that do require teachers are so expensive that they couldn't afford to live near the schools. The cost of housing has severely affected the stability and effectiveness of the education on offer to our children. Education, education, education...

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It's worth pointing out that a new nuclear build is almost impossible under the current planning laws.

Should the government decide to go down this path then they will, nay, must overhaul the current planning comittee system. They will also have to do this in a way that allows new builds to be easier to permit.

So the planning process is likely to come under review, it will be interesting to see how far any reforms go.

It may be just a coincidence - or a gamble - but Manchester Uni have about posted about 10 openings for nuclear related scientists in the last week. Can't help wondering if they've been given a "heads up" by somebody...

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Interestingly, overall we don't have teacher shortages. There are many, many new teachers who are unable to get jobs and the areas that do require teachers are so expensive that they couldn't afford to live near the schools. The cost of housing has severely affected the stability and effectiveness of the education on offer to our children. Education, education, education...

I was thinking this yesterday as I passed by yet another bill board advertising for teachers? What is the deal, I have many friends who didn't want to get a regular job and liked the idea of teacher funding so went down that route.

What we will end up with if a load of teachers who are pretty useless, not everyone should teach, yet the government think so. :angry:

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It may be just a coincidence - or a gamble - but Manchester Uni have about posted about 10 openings for nuclear related scientists in the last week. Can't help wondering if they've been given a "heads up" by somebody...

The Engineering Dept. has very strong ties to the nuclear industry, they have done a lot of research on various nuclear industry related problems.

There will be a new build.

Fuel will come from Australia and Canada rather than Russia and the Middle East. It's the Anglosphere looking out for its own interests. Oil is no longer a cheap and easy option.

Edited by ?...!

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We have too many cars - because we have easy Credit!

We (allegedly) have too few houses - because we have a high rate of divorce

We cant afford to have children if want to own a home - so like everything else, We Import them with Immigration

Why is it everyone gets £200 to have a child? Because it MAY allow you to have a child and buy a property in a druggie area. Then we wont complain about housing.

The country has gone mad. We are run by hoodies on the streets. Our drug dealer economy is the best performing economy this country has to offer. We cant have kids so whos gonna pay for the pitance pension that we will probably never get?

Labour's Social Skills are Inept to say the least!!!

GB has absolutely phucked us all over. This is going to take DECADES to sort out.

DONT VOTE THAT DICKHEAD IN!

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The problem isn't so much population but 50 years of planning constraints that have created an artificial shortage of a plentiful resource, 90% of the country lives on 10% of the land and all our supporting infrastructure (including roads) accounts for less than an additional 10%.

Spot on where I live. If you go round many of the villages where I live you will see posters up about stop the central Borders becoming a sububrb of Edinburgh. Not to 70,000 new homes etc. etc.

We have tons of space. It's one of the most sparsly populated parts of the country. But the lucky few who boaught houses before the boom seem to regard it as there personal playground.

Unfortunately, these voices seem to be the only ones capable of organising or complaining. It dose not seem to matter to them that their own childern will be excluded for some reason.

Time to organize and start writing some letter's to the planning department I think.

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We have too many cars - because we have easy Credit!

We (allegedly) have too few houses - because we have a high rate of divorce

We cant afford to have children if want to own a home - so like everything else, We Import them with Immigration

Why is it everyone gets £200 to have a child? Because it MAY allow you to have a child and buy a property in a druggie area. Then we wont complain about housing.

The country has gone mad. We are run by hoodies on the streets. Our drug dealer economy is the best performing economy this country has to offer. We cant have kids so whos gonna pay for the pitance pension that we will probably never get?

Labour's Social Skills are Inept to say the least!!!

GB has absolutely phucked us all over. This is going to take DECADES to sort out.

DONT VOTE THAT DICKHEAD IN!

My thoughts exactly. The damage done is extreme and what frustrates me most is that hardly anyone sees it.

Coul'd that be because those in power and with existing assets have done rather well out of it all.

In truth, the only ones Phucked are the under 35s and we don't have a big enough voice.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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