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Are we on the brink of social collapse?


Midlifemum
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30 minutes ago, Sancho Panza said:

The flip side of that is declining real wages,rising rents,declining disposable incomes,problems in schools with a lot of non English speakers etc cause problems.

Plus NHS, future pension obligations, etc, etc.  But these costs are not included in GDP so that's our problem and our kids' problem, not theirs.  More corporate welfare.

I used to think the superficial coverage by the media was incompetence.  I now think it is by design.  Mussolini style Fascism without the pretty uniforms.

Immigration is another symptom where we yet again fail to join up the dots.  The elephant in the room far bigger than a single issue like immigration.

Edited by Fence
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20 minutes ago, fru-gal said:

I was more of a rock chick but at least the 90s there were distinct subcultures, now everything is so samey and right-on. Boring.

Full societal brain washing. I am surprised the banks have not pushed the debt message through music to the millennialism generation full control :lol:

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11 minutes ago, ThePrufeshanul said:

I love the theory about British Culture no longer holding the country together.

What exactly was this magical "British Culture"? Morris dancing?

From Belfast, it's obviously The Smiths.

And Cornwall.

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15 hours ago, longgone said:

Full societal brain washing. I am surprised the banks have not pushed the debt message through music to the millennialism generation full control :lol:

I'm not sure music is that big a deal for young people any more.  They seem to spend much more time taking pictures of their own faces/arses than listening to tunes!

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18 hours ago, fru-gal said:

I was more of a rock chick but at least the 90s there were distinct subcultures, now everything is so samey and right-on. Boring.

That's so true, everything's so homogeneous now. I remember at my sixth-form there were the goths, townies, punks, geeks, surfer dudes (my uniform was quiksilver and mambo and I listened to Reef non-stop!).

Interestingly, the hipster subculture is the only one where it's members don't self-identify ('I'm not a hipster!') and it has no basis of it's own, it just borrows each element from other subcultures.

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19 hours ago, Fence said:

Plus NHS, future pension obligations, etc, etc.  But these costs are not included in GDP so that's our problem and our kids' problem, not theirs.  More corporate welfare.

I think this issue of state pension is a can that has been and can continue to be kicked down the road. The reasoning is the simple: 'to earn a pound, someone has to spend a pound'. Imagine if half the population, being retired, had no income. All sorts of businesses would go out of business through lack of demand for their goods and services. It would then be in everone's interest for the government to create the money ex-nihlo, so long as businesses and services didn't then become maxed out, but retained some spare capacity. If businesses did come close to maxing out, then the pension could be reduced, since people would be buying more than they needed. Automation is going to help with this since it will allow more goods and services to be produced by fewer people, so pushing the 'max out' limit higher. This thinking is all part of MMT, which is behaviourist, rather than dismally theoretical.

 

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7 minutes ago, fru-gal said:

Yup. I was thinking the other day that you never see proper metalheads anymore (long hair, biker jackets, denim waistocoats with patches etc). I used to see loads of them walking down Oxford Street and Carnaby Street, now you don't see any unless you go to the big metal festivals. Same with goths. Haven't seen any in ages. Everything has become very very boring and monoculture (a bit like the architecture in London!).

head up to camden plenty round there.   

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13 hours ago, ThePrufeshanul said:

I love the theory about British Culture no longer holding the country together.

What exactly was this magical "British Culture"? Morris dancing?

Funny you say that its a mentality, ethos style you may not feel it but those outside the UK do.

We are actually a cultural colossus walk down any African street and you will see t shirts with the union jack on them.  You take things for granted but for example James Bond movies...unrealistic yes but they sell an image of a elegant, advanced capable Britain. 

Our greatest trojan horse our language which means all serious speakers will have a desire to visit the source.

Ps I like Morris dancing its no more stupid than my wife having to tie a 20kg fish round her leg and walk around the house after we got married.  I just wish we celebrated such things more.

 

 

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On 22/10/2017 at 2:21 PM, Talking Monkey said:

Totally agree early 90s to about 97/98 was golden, mind you I was young and the music and clubbing was awesome. Everything wasn't big corporate and financialised.

There was a "right" balance with capital and labour struck from WWII to about the maybe the early 1980s, and while the 1990s was a relatively good decade on hindsight, things were already tipping over the side then through excess banking since the late 80s, ignorance to the effects of earlier globalisation, and property for the sake of property (at expense of real production and quality of life), it just took until the mid to late 2000s to really bite and crumble apart.

And while the current system benefits big megacorporations (in the short term) ruining the Western middle classes by inflicting unemployment or debt upon them and stripping out Western economies through globalisation or automation has ultimately ended up being a poisoned pill for them (and some megacorps like Enron just collapsed through dodgy book keeping alone).

Also civil order and safety is crumbling in London with crime outpacing crime in a similar city like New York.

 

Edited by Big Orange
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On 24/10/2017 at 11:50 AM, Errol said:

Hordes of Africans Waiting to Flood Europe 

500,000 Africans are being held in camps in Libya, waiting to be shipped to Europe by compliant NGOs and other groups.

http://russia-insider.com/en/hordes-africans-waiting-flood-europe-excellent-russian-tv-report/ri21318

The very sad thing is Africa for decades has the right space and resources to give its native Africans reasonable housing and quality of life  (but the small minded tribal leaders and criminally insane local despots p*ssed all that up the wall to overly please Western and Eastern firms for many decades).

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On 23/10/2017 at 7:32 PM, ThePrufeshanul said:

I don't dispute that Britain contains a lot of culture. 

What I am disputing is that there is or has ever been a common cultural basis that ties the nation together. 

Big difference.

There are degrees of similarities even if there hasn't ever been any concrete definition and boundaries to it. It's British culture if it looks and feels like it is, even if most of the more obvious examples would more accurately be looked at being English, Scottish, Welsh, or Northern Irish, or even amongst regions of those places. Never underestimate the importance of look and feel, even if it's another of the things the usual suspects dismiss because they can't nail it down and measure it.

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There's a difference between not existing and not being measurable (although smiley noted). Once you're past the necessities of life most of the things that make life worth living aren't measureable - the aforementioned look and feel, love, friendship, the pleasure from music, that sort of thing. Beware anything that threatens those for supposedly more important practical changes.

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On 10/19/2017 at 10:16 PM, FedupTeddiBear said:

The question has been asked a couple of times now and still nobody has had a go at answering it. 

 

What makes a person British?

http://metro.co.uk/2017/10/30/pakistani-christian-beaten-by-gang-of-muslims-for-having-poppies-on-his-car-7037489/

I would say that the victim in this story is and the criminals aren't.

Quote

A Christian who fled Pakistan to escape violence 10 years ago says he believes he was beaten up because he had poppies on his car.

Tajamal Amar, 46, suffered a broken nose and several lacerations to the head and body after being attacked outside the Red Chilli takeaway in Littleover, Derby, on October 20.

I don't think we should give foreign aid to Pakistan if they force businessmen who have the wrong religion to leave.

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  • 1 month later...
On 21/10/2017 at 10:26 PM, zugzwang said:

I'd also give  a shout out to the anonymous authors of 'The End of Banking', who explain with admirable succinctness how the shadow banking system transforms outside money into inside money, and why we don't actually need banks in a networked world.

 

On 22/10/2017 at 11:26 AM, zugzwang said:

It's an interesting book.  I'm not sure peer-to-peer lending and anti-deflationary liquidity fees are widely applicable solutions, but their idea for preventing commercial banks and shadow banks creating inside money seems to make sense.

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6 hours ago, Will! said:

 

It's an interesting book.  I'm not sure peer-to-peer lending and anti-deflationary liquidity fees are widely applicable solutions, but their idea for preventing commercial banks and shadow banks creating inside money seems to make sense.

The first 2/3rd of the book is beautifully written and researched, the most complete sketch of the GFC, regulatory failure, and the role of shadow banking that I've ever read. The only thing missing perhaps was any recognition of the causal link between the crisis and the explosive growth of international tax havens since 1979 (mirroring the financialisation of the Western economy). The scramble for high-yield mortgage-backed securities begins and ends in Mauritius and the Cayman Islands with the One Percenters, as far away from subprime as it's possible to get.

Yeah, the final 1/3rd does feel a bit rushed and unconvincing, a passing C grade rather than an A+. Negative nominal interest rates probably aren't a good idea, even when enforced by digital fiat. Anybody with significant cash holdings will simply move them into a money-like substitute (gold, oil futures, T-bills or crypto) and leave them there for the duration. Peer-to-peer lending may not be a practical solution either (tomorrow or ever) - but an ecology of many smaller lending institutions is surely the way forward. Too big to fail is too big, period. And that includes the Bank of England. Inside money should either be eradicated or properly subject to risk, with all that implies for deposit security.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Surplus Energy Economics has an answer:

Quote

Regarding future trends, it seems to me that social complexity is equally a function of surplus energy availability. Although probably a lagging indicator. In other words, history and common sense suggest that a multi-cultural, diverse society, with lots of single mothers, and state funded pensioners, is very energy expensive and only became possible in recent times because enough surplus energy was available.
If so, then a post high surplus energy society would be forced to revert back to traditional morality. The only affordable society would be a homogenenous society with high social cohesion; post diversity, post multi-culturalism and post working women. In this scenario, women couldn’t be permitted to have jobs as it would be vital that all men had breadwinner jobs, but those men would then have to take full responsibility for both their wives, their children and their frail elderly parents. Probably all living under one roof. And so the wheel would have turned full circle.

 

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