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Sledgehead

Aggregator Sites: do you trust them?

Aggregator Sites : do you trust them with your data?  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. Aggregator sites, like CompareTheMarket, MoneySupermarket and GoCompare are considered an essential part of modern budgetting. But to use them meaningfully, we must hand them large amounts of our personal details. Following the Equifax hack, it is clear that even those we might rely on to flag problems with ID theft, simply can't be trusted. Why then trust aggregator sites? What do you trust them with?

    • I don't use them cos I'm not into all that money "saving" stuff
      2
    • I don't use them for privavcy reasons
      1
    • I use them but lie about all personally identifying data (name, email, address, telephone, mobile, car reg)
      4
    • I use them with my real details, but restrict usage to utilities where information is less personal
      3
    • I use them with my real details and trust them with car insurance, as well as utilities
      2
    • I use them with my real details and trust them with home insurance (including contents), as well as utilities
      2
    • I use multiple aggretgator sites with my real details and trust them with insurance and utilities.
      0
    • I use multiple aggregator sites with my real details and leverage them with coupon / cashback sites for insurance / utilities
      2


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I'm a "6".

How stupid am I? Don't answer that.

The fact is, in order for these sites to be most useful (ie easy to use, meaningful), we are more or less obliged to enter our real world data in its entirety. I have long maintained that more convenience automatically means less security, and vice versa. I'm beginning to wish I'd listened to myself in respect of aggregators.

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Not convinced that they do need full details. Put in false, but close, and the offer that comes up seems to be pretty near to what you actually get. Whilst "John Smith aged a couple of years different from me, doing the same sort of job, driving the same car and living in the same postcode" is close to identifiable it's not exact yet for a quote what else do they truly require? I resent any attempt at asking for such information if it's not really required to provide the service. So for insurance, say, I have to give the insurer full details to actually take it. Before then, not convinced.

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Cheers R, I was kinda hoping someone would proffer that kind of experience. Think I'm gonna start editing my details.

TBH, I can't recall a time I simply picked a price comparison option and paid for it there and then. I always seem to end up talking directly with a sales bod at the chosen insurer, and they then take me through all those damn questions I thought I'd already answered at the aggregator anyhow, so where's the harm is feeding the aggregator some BS?

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With the exception of Go Compare, which I will never use due to their extremely annoying advertisements, I use them for things like energy and broadband but never buy through them. I usually tweak my details to be close enough for accuracy but not enough to identify me.

With most online pricing sites, if they demand my email address, I'm out of there PDQ.

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5 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

With the exception of Go Compare, which I will never use due to their extremely annoying advertisements, I use them for things like energy and broadband but never buy through them. I usually tweak my details to be close enough for accuracy but not enough to identify me.

With most online pricing sites, if they demand my email address, I'm out of there PDQ.

My pet hate is Money Supermarket for their advertisements.

I usually only use aggregator sites for car insurance, I use the name and email address of my alter ego which I concocted many years ago for use on the internet. He's about my age and just like me he has a clean licence and lots of no claims and by happy coincidence for the postcode lives in the same road as me but at number 65 (the last house is number 64). Just put the car details as "haven't bought it yet" and away you go.

I think everyone should have a person like that for online activities.

BTW I also cancel the email address for a few weeks when it really starts filling up with junk then reinstate it later, the bounced emails while it's dead get you taken off the spammers active lists.

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Thanks O5. More great advice. I have an alter ego I invented for forums, but, being naive by nature (bad genes :D ), I used to think aggregators trustworthy ( where is the face-palm emoticon?), so only used that fake ID on one such site.

Incidentally, the whole Equifax thing had me researching credit reference agencies, where I discovered, to my horror, that having such a fake ID might make such firms class me as having committed so-called 'first party fraud'. Moreover, they could theoretically place this adjudication against my (real) name, in their big-brother databases - without the benefit of investigation, trial, judge or jury! :o

Moreover, that action could have real consequences - 'could', I say, if I wanted any of their stinking credit!

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12 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Thanks O5. More great advice. I have an alter ego I invented for forums, but, being naive by nature (bad genes :D ), I used to think aggregators trustworthy ( where is the face-palm emoticon?), so only used that fake ID on one such site.

Incidentally, the whole Equifax thing had me researching credit reference agencies, where I discovered, to my horror, that having such a fake ID might make such firms class me as having committed so-called 'first party fraud'. Moreover, they could theoretically place this adjudication against my (real) name, in their big-brother databases - without the benefit of investigation, trial, judge or jury! :o

Moreover, that action could have real consequences - 'could', I say, if I wanted any of their stinking credit!

There are no direct links between me and my imaginary friend, however if hiding your true identity behind a pen name, nickname or avatar got you blacklisted everyone on here would be on it, so would J K Rowling et al.

I don't have credit, no need for it so they can do what they like, anyway it couldn't be first party fraud as no payment is involved.

First party fraud refers to fraud that is committed by an individual or group of individuals on their own account by opening an account with no intention of repayment.

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1 hour ago, Option5 said:

First party fraud refers to fraud that is committed by an individual or group of individuals on their own account by opening an account with no intention of repayment.

 

Ah, I stand corrected, was thinking of False Identity Fraud

 

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6 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

 

Ah, I stand corrected, was thinking of False Identity Fraud

 

Using a made up email address to protect your privacy is not fraud any more than drawing your curtains to stop people seeing who lives at your house is. All you're doing is keeping your data safe, which is something we're encouraged to do. The worst that can happen is that your email is cancelled because of the Ts & Cs of the email service provider.

Unless you do it for gain or cause a loss to another party or for something that's illegal it's fine.

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1 hour ago, Option5 said:

 

Unless you do it for gain or cause a loss to another party or for something that's illegal it's fine.

Seeing as I have alter aliases online, it would be wrong of me to say I disagree with that, at least in principle.

However, recent trolling of MPs has seen calls (eg Peter Hitchens, who I would have thought was in favour of privacy) for Facebook etc to ensure only real IDs are used in setting up accounts. So, perhaps the trolling of politicians might lead to a change in the law that renders fake online IDs all but illegal. Then what? For the moment the big techs are resisting, but the 'terrorism' justification might prove pretty convincing.

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45 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Seeing as I have alter aliases online, it would be wrong of me to say I disagree with that, at least in principle.

However, recent trolling of MPs has seen calls (eg Peter Hitchens, who I would have thought was in favour of privacy) for Facebook etc to ensure only real IDs are used in setting up accounts. So, perhaps the trolling of politicians might lead to a change in the law that renders fake online IDs all but illegal. Then what? For the moment the big techs are resisting, but the 'terrorism' justification might prove pretty convincing.

Of course all your data is safe on these aggregator sites although not as safe as it is with the extra security implemented by financial firms.....

Emails and more could be breached in possible Deloitte cyberattack

https://www.digitallook.com/news/news-and-announcements/emails-and-more-could-be-breached-in-possible-deloitte-cyberattack--2876638.html

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1 hour ago, Sledgehead said:

Seeing as I have alter aliases online, it would be wrong of me to say I disagree with that, at least in principle.

However, recent trolling of MPs has seen calls (eg Peter Hitchens, who I would have thought was in favour of privacy) for Facebook etc to ensure only real IDs are used in setting up accounts. So, perhaps the trolling of politicians might lead to a change in the law that renders fake online IDs all but illegal. Then what? For the moment the big techs are resisting, but the 'terrorism' justification might prove pretty convincing.

What next, have to wear a star so people can see your religion without you hiding behind it?

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19 hours ago, Option5 said:

Of course all your data is safe on these aggregator sites although not as safe as it is with the extra security implemented by financial firms.....

Emails and more could be breached in possible Deloitte cyberattack

https://www.digitallook.com/news/news-and-announcements/emails-and-more-could-be-breached-in-possible-deloitte-cyberattack--2876638.html

Quote

An administrative account was used by the attacker to gain unfettered access to the company’s cloud email service, hosted through Microsoft Azure, with the administrator’s account reportedly not having two-factor authentication turned on.

....

It’s understood the breach was focusses on the US, and Deloitte’s internal investigators were still not certain of who the attacker was, or whether it was a business, a state-sponsored hacker, or an individual.

 

Niece came straight out of uni, got a job as an agency worker at one of the big four banks, essentially providing leads to sales and marketing, by it seems, snooping on the financial activities of the bank's wealthy clients. Next thing she's telling me about the sums of money these people hold in their accounts. Within a year she is working from home. She has zero interest in finance.

Strikes me, if she was of a mind to, she could pass these details to anyone.

Now imagine being a junior tech at Deloitte, equally disinterested in one's job. What would you have to do to 'blamelessly' allow system access to criminals (who were paying you handsomely to do so)? I'd start with turning off two factor authentication. And that would essentially be the finish as well.

 

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  • 297 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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