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Mrs Bear

Heating went on tonight

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...and for once it was Mr B, not me, who put it on.  Hope he's not sickening for something - he's usually got his own central heating. 

Mind you he never will Wrap Up Warm like I do.  It was decidedly chilly, though - what happened to Indian summers?  I recall coming back from Greece around  this time a couple of years ago and it was almost as warm as in the Peloponnese (sp?). 

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Just tonight? Has been on for the last couple of weeks here. So much for the usual dry and warm September. We'll probably get as heatwave in October! 

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Central heating???  In September?  You or Mr B must be getting old!!!

I had the gas fire on for half an hour one evening. I think it was Wednesday. 

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Mr B may well be taking the very practical approach.

The summer wasn't one (a summer), so house interiors remain cool. You'll probably hear people saying "it's warmer out than in". That might not be absolutely true, but it reveals a growing threat: damp cavities and inner leaves of cavity walls that occurs when you get sunshine and showers.

When the rain falls, it wets the outer leaf of the cavity wall. The sun then comes out and warms up the outer wall. Most people think this just dries the leaf out, assuming that the water vapourized will travel outward only. But water vapour doesn't know what direction "out" is, so it vapourises both outwards and inwards.

Outside, the movement of air dries the wall. But inside the cavity, the migrating vapourized water meets the cavity. If the outer leaf is sufficiently warmed, the vapour will migrate into the cavity. Now the cavity is full of moist air.

It can now migrate onto the inner leaf. If you haven't got your heating on, this leaf may well be cold enough to condense this vapour, making the inner brickwork damp.

Meanwhile, moisture from breath and cooking and showering etc is also condensing on the cold inner leaf.

The result is an inner leaf that is damp all the way through.. Such brickwork conducts heat many times faster than a dry leaf. As a consequence, that leaf will be difficult to warm up later in the season, and will be a medium term drain on your heating.

The solution is to always try to keep your inner leaf a littke warmer than the outer leaf. When you view it this way you realise that those sunny spells in between showers aren't the cue for you to open your windows. You should instead be trapping this warmth in those sun-affected rooms, so that the warmth counters the warming of the outer leaf.

External and internal air and leaf temperature measurements will also keep you on the right side of the war on damp.

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13 hours ago, developer said:

No heating on here, got my window wide open. It's not even cold yet to be honest.

Here on the South coast we have it pretty warm by comparison w/ most of the country. But I would not be bragging about open windows. Humidity is 70%. Bet your house humidity is more like 40% if you've been careful. Why would you want to up that?

'Course, if you are opening your windows at night and closing them in the day, then you are doing the right thing (night air is drier and your interior will be warmer than outside, so there's less chance of air condensing within the house). But I'm guessing you are not. Got plenty of neighbours who complain about damp issues. Funnily enough they all have their windows wide open in the daytime - you know - "to dry things out". Sure.

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19 hours ago, developer said:

No heating on here, got my window wide open. It's not even cold yet to be honest.

Same....no heating and window open at night......inside now 18 degrees, outside 14 degrees 6pm, not cold enough to heat yet.;)

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1 hour ago, Sledgehead said:

don't you have a 'summer' setting?

Sort of, I switch it off when we're away from May through August. The rest of the year it's on, but I turn the thermostat down to a low setting when we're away during November & December as a frost precaution, the rest of the time it's set to about 22 degrees.

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11 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

Sort of, I switch it off when we're away from May through August. The rest of the year it's on, but I turn the thermostat down to a low setting when we're away during November & December as a frost precaution, the rest of the time it's set to about 22 degrees.

Methinks you are running your pump unnecessarily, but maybe the 22 degs is an indication you could not really give a stuff about that!:P

If you could just find somewhere else to go for a couple of months extra, you could do w/o a heating system period, or for that matter your entire house!

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2 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Methinks you are running your pump unnecessarily, but maybe the 22 degs is an indication you could not really give a stuff about that!:P

If you could just find somewhere else to go for a couple of months extra, you could do w/o a heating system period, or for that matter your entire house!

Thermostat switches pump and boiler.

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26 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

Thermostat switches pump and boiler.

I doubt it.

Tho I could well be wrong.

Pumps generally work even when your heating system is not calling for heat. That way cold rooms don't just sit there with prematurely chilled radiators, whilst warm rooms sit there with warm water in their radiators. By continuously circulating the water, temperature is balanced throughout the house (give or take thermostatic radiator valve discrepancies). Only then does a whole-house thermostat make sense.

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53 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

I doubt it.

Tho I could well be wrong.

Pumps generally work even when your heating system is not calling for heat. That way cold rooms don't just sit there with prematurely chilled radiators, whilst warm rooms sit there with warm water in their radiators. By continuously circulating the water, temperature is balanced throughout the house (give or take thermostatic radiator valve discrepancies). Only then does a whole-house thermostat make sense.

You are! 

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16 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

You are! 

Yeah, I figured that out.

It's probably why I've always avoided a thermostat. They just don't operate the way I want them to. I prefer to control the heating water temp.

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15 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Yeah, I figured that out.

It's probably why I've always avoided a thermostat. They just don't operate the way I want them to. I prefer to control the heating water temp.

You can control that too, by adjusting the boiler thermostat, but before you play with that, read up on the most efficient flow and return temperatures for a modern condensing boiler and how to achieve them. 

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18 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

You can control that too, by adjusting the boiler thermostat, but before you play with that, read up on the most efficient flow and return temperatures for a modern condensing boiler and how to achieve them. 

 

Thing is, if you have a room thermostat, adjusting the boiler thermostat is an unlikely occurrence. You are likely to set a singular setting. That is unlikely to be optimal.

I don't have a condensing boiler. I have a combi which I can easily service. But the story is the same really. Condensing boilers need a cool return to condense flue gas efficiently. While combis don't attempt to recover extra flue gas heat, operating them for higher flow temps means higher burner pressure for longer, so again, more wasted flue heat.

When it's warmish, combis can be operated with lower flow temps. But that is a situation one is unlikely to bother with if one has a room stat. Which is a good reason for not having one.

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I turned the gas fire on a couple of days ago. On the low setting and it will stay on until it warms up in March or April. The room will be somewhat cool over the winter but never cold, which suits me fine.

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We tend to put the heating on from November to March on a 24/7 stat at 15c, which costs very little. Currently the room is 15.7c with the heating off, which to me feels quite warm. 

If you are fairly  active, we've got a large garden and both of us walk over fifty miles a week, then you heat yourself.

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On 2017/09/18 at 4:18 AM, Errol said:

It's certainly colder than last year. Could this presage a brutal winter?

The Canada Geese have flown south early, so I'm guessing they know something we don't.

We've had heating on and off for a week or more. In the next few days we'll probably cover up the air conditioner for the next six months.

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It's been about 3c  below normal in London and the South East.  It has averaged 13c against an average of 16c for September. Take a couple of degrees off that for the provinces and it has felt more like mid October. However, as we approach late September we are back to the seasonal norm or even slightly above. By day it should be 19c and by night 13c on average across London. The highest temperature recorded in London was on the 8th September. at 19c. So the highest temperate is normally the mean high across the month.

This follows on from a cool July and August. But January to June was one of the warmest first halves of the year ever.

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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