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Sledgehead

Equifax Hack: 44m Brits data stolen - isn't that all of us?

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36 minutes ago, Bossybabe said:

I'm not sure how useful our credit records would be?:huh:

and oh the irony of being told that, having had our data stolen from a credit ref co, we should sign up for credit alerts with, you guessed it, a credit ref co.

is this hack even real, or is it just a way to get us to shell out a tenner a month on one of their alerts products?

and if it is real, surely signing up for alerts will surely entail giving those leaky credit ref cos even more of my personal info.

like wtf?

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You would think there would be some law, to give you a choice as to whether your data is stored.

 

Most people in the UK do not know what Equifax is, yet they have no choice but to have their data stored with them.

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1 hour ago, reddog said:

You would think there would be some law, to give you a choice as to whether your data is stored.

 

Most people in the UK do not know what Equifax is, yet they have no choice but to have their data stored with them.

There will be, i.e GDPR, which the EU is enforcing next year. Mega fines for non compliance, upto 4% of global turnover. 

This will still apply to the UK irrespective of Brexit, as if we want to trade with Europe we'll need to follow the privacy laws.

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OMG, Equifax security freeze PINs are worse than I thought. If you froze your credit today 2:15pm ET for example, you'd get PIN 0908171415.

Perhaps the banks should freeze all fresh applications for credit until this is resolved, given the risk to the bank of approving any new credit from anyone.

I'm starting to think this could be the black swan event which crashes everything.

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15 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

There will be, i.e GDPR, which the EU is enforcing next year. Mega fines for non compliance, upto 4% of global turnover. 

This will still apply to the UK irrespective of Brexit, as if we want to trade with Europe we'll need to follow the privacy laws.

But this will surely be  just an extension of the usual "I grant XYZ the right to share my data with ... blah, blah .. in basically everywhere [and I will tick this check box cos what choice do I really have given I need telecoms etc and every provider out there demands I sign an equivalent clause].

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14 minutes ago, Habeas Domus said:

OMG, Equifax security freeze PINs are worse than I thought. If you froze your credit today 2:15pm ET for example, you'd get PIN 0908171415.

Perhaps the banks should freeze all fresh applications for credit until this is resolved, given the risk to the bank of approving any new credit from anyone.

I'm starting to think this could be the black swan event which crashes everything.

Not sure the PIN is so bad. It does require a hacker know when one froze one's credit. Then again, it depends how many failed PIN attempts lock the whole unfreezing process.

Is anyone here gonna lock their credit?

How to freeze your credit after a data breach  ... Or before

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12 hours ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

There will be, i.e GDPR, which the EU is enforcing next year. Mega fines for non compliance, upto 4% of global turnover. 

This will still apply to the UK irrespective of Brexit, as if we want to trade with Europe we'll need to follow the privacy laws.

Try renting anywhere, getting a mortgage, even gettiing a mobile phone ffs, without a credit report - impossible.

As reddog says, in today's society you have little choice except to allow them access to your data.

Which should mean any fine resulting from this breach should be massive and punitive. Doubt it will be though.

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37 minutes ago, RentingForever said:

Try renting anywhere, getting a mortgage, even gettiing a mobile phone ffs, without a credit report - impossible.

As reddog says, in today's society you have little choice except to allow them access to your data.

Which should mean any fine resulting from this breach should be massive and punitive. Doubt it will be though.

If this were 2018 it would be a massive fine.

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48 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

If this were 2018 it would be a massive fine.

 

and I repeat  :

13 hours ago, Sledgehead said:

But this will surely be  just an extension of the usual "I grant XYZ the right to share my data with ... blah, blah .. in basically everywhere [and I will tick this check box cos what choice do I really have given I need telecoms etc and every provider out there demands I sign an equivalent clause].

 

 

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This is turning into a skullf***

Those familiar w/ the story will know executives sold stock 3 days after the data breach, whilst then keeping the story from the authorities / press for weeks.

Now it seems that Equifax are using the fear generated to drive sales of its "security" product, TrustID.

Those wishing to see if their data has been compromised are directed to a checker-webpage hosted by TrustID and asked to enter id info. They are then given what seems like a random adjudication, heavily biased towards one having been affected, before being asked whether they wish to "continue" their "enrollment"  in TrustID.

Check it out: PSA: no matter what, Equifax may tell you you’ve been impacted by the hack

 

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Latest.

Good news is we've taken 3 whole zeros off the impact:

Equifax hack puts data of 400,000 UK customers at risk

Quote

... a file containing UK consumer information “may potentially have been accessed”.

The data includes names, dates of birth, email addresses and telephone numbers, but does not contain postal addresses, passwords or financial information.

[Equifax] said it would contact them in writing to offer advice and a free identity protection service to monitor their personal information and data.

 

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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