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Si1

Anti central banks and anti QE, zirp - no punchline - today's Alex cartoon in the telegraph

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I guess the undertone is that if the Tories lose the next ge then it will be the fault of independent central Bank policy screwing the economy with zirp etc.

Edited by Si1

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What happens to a country that bucks the trend? Do they become a bigger example of the old adage "the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent" (approx), or do they, in theory, prosper (or at least survive the eventual global riots/debtocolypse?)

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On 06/09/2017 at 5:18 PM, tomandlu said:

What happens to a country that bucks the trend? Do they become a bigger example of the old adage "the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent" (approx), or do they, in theory, prosper (or at least survive the eventual global riots/debtocolypse?)

Trends, yer, I remember the story's at the time about how resilient the canadian housing market and economy were because they were little affected by the down turn most felt - now it just looks like they were lagging behind the curve.  Same CB tricks as every other western economy.  It would be interesting to ask Mark Carney if he would have raised rates like they've just done?  and if they were truly lagging surely we would or should of have rate rises by now.

Hate to say but it seems CB's run all our lives.  Having cartoons like that in the telegraph is like "here is what's really wrong" but nothing will change, goyim לחזור לעבודה

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"they're still too scared to do anything that might have bad consequences, like hiking interest rates"

Fortunately there are no bad consequences to pumping house prices up to 10-20x salaries and keeping them there for a generation...

The cartoon is not remotely radical. It's not complaining about the policies CBs are following, just the fact they're not elected. And yet Mark Carney's boss is the Chancellor of the Exchequer, so actually there is democratic oversight.

The Telegraph is still fumbling around for a coherent narrative on what is wrong with the UK economy. Hint: high house prices might have something to do with it.

Edited by Dorkins

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On 06/09/2017 at 5:18 PM, tomandlu said:

What happens to a country that bucks the trend? Do they become a bigger example of the old adage "the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent" (approx), or do they, in theory, prosper (or at least survive the eventual global riots/debtocolypse?)

 

Or is it....     'Central Bankers can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent'.

You heard it here first.

 

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1 hour ago, Dorkins said:

"they're still too scared to do anything that might have bad consequences, like hiking interest rates"

Fortunately there are no bad consequences to pumping house prices up to 10-20x salaries and keeping them there for a generation...

The cartoon is not remotely radical. It's not complaining about the policies CBs are following, just the fact they're not elected. And yet Mark Carney's boss is the Chancellor of the Exchequer, so actually there is democratic oversight.

The Telegraph is still fumbling around for a coherent narrative on what is wrong with the UK economy. Hint: high house prices might have something to do with it.

Good point well made. Facing up to the reality of a batsh1t hard left govt in 2022, the Tories are seeking someone to blame. Corbyn may well be Cameron's greatest achievement.

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8 minutes ago, IMHAL said:

 

Or is it....     'Central Bankers can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent'.

You heard it here first.

 

Genius.

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5 minutes ago, suresh786 said:

Can CB go to Bust ?

The currency can collapse, which is probably the same thing I would guess.

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Something someone said don't recall who said it.....'to be a capitalist requires having capital, to be a conservative you require something to conserve'.........I don't think mortgage holders are that much of a problem if rates increase, it is business and jobs that will suffer most and the middle men and agents that survive on fees and services.......rising unemployment and a drastic fall in growth is the fear.....keep on borrowing the future on large cheap amounts will only mean doesn't matter how much the common man holds they will continue to become poorer unless they are forced to extend their debt to the next generation. ;)

 

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The whole "what hope the politicians then?" line also ignores the possibility that there might be an entire generation or two of voters following up behind who would quite like to see an asset price crash rather than the "healthy markets" we are enjoying right now.

Basically it seems like the cartoonists are firmly inside the bubble. It would make sense, they are both tail end Boomers (1958 and 1960) at least one of whom lives in London http://www.alexcartoon.com/index.cfm?section=creators

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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