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Rogue private landlords given £2.5bn a year of public money

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"The Independent revealed last month that almost a third of private rented homes in England, totalling 1.4 million properties, are currently substandard, while 17 per cent contain the most dangerous type of safety hazard"

I missed this when it came out, and even I am shocked at this news. Only licencing of every private landlord can help sort this out, along with checks before any property is rented out. 

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To be classed as non-decent, a home must have inadequate heating, outdated sanitation, be in a state of serious disrepair or be unsafe, for example due to a dangerous boiler, vermin infestation or faulty wiring.

? Too easy. 

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1 hour ago, Ah-so said:

"The Independent revealed last month that almost a third of private rented homes in England, totalling 1.4 million properties, are currently substandard, while 17 per cent contain the most dangerous type of safety hazard"

I missed this when it came out, and even I am shocked at this news. Only licencing of every private landlord can help sort this out, along with checks before any property is rented out. 

Bit I've bolded.  Never going to happen under the current Government.

Paragaphs from the Guardian story about the number of landlords Newham Council uncovered who weren't paying tax.

"Newham is battling with the Department for Communities and Local Government to have its licensing scheme renewed, following a 2015 clampdown by the government, which said licensing imposes “unnecessary additional costs” on landlords. Neighbouring borough Redbridge has already had its application for landlord licensing rejected.

...

Liverpool, Waltham Forest, Barking and Dagenham, and Croydon have all introduced compulsory licensing schemes following Newham’s success, but other boroughs hoping to match them have run into opposition from central government.

Since 2015, local authorities have been forced to apply to the secretary of state for permission to license landlords if the scheme affects more than 20% of the homes in the borough or its geographical area.

Housing minister Brandon Lewis wrote to local authorities in March 2015 to warn them of an amendment to licensing rules. He said: “The blanket licensing approach adopted by some local authorities has major drawbacks. This is because it impacts on all landlords and places additional burdens on reputable landlords who are already fully compliant with their obligations, thereby creating additional unnecessary costs for reputable landlords which are generally passed on to tenants through higher rents.

“The vast majority of landlords provide a good service and the government does not believe it is right to impose unnecessary additional costs on them, or their tenants. Such an approach is disproportionate and unfairly penalises good landlords.”"

 

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4 minutes ago, Snugglybear said:

Bit I've bolded.  Never going to happen under the current Government.

Paragaphs from the Guardian story about the number of landlords Newham Council uncovered who weren't paying tax.

"Newham is battling with the Department for Communities and Local Government to have its licensing scheme renewed, following a 2015 clampdown by the government, which said licensing imposes “unnecessary additional costs” on landlords. Neighbouring borough Redbridge has already had its application for landlord licensing rejected.

...

Liverpool, Waltham Forest, Barking and Dagenham, and Croydon have all introduced compulsory licensing schemes following Newham’s success, but other boroughs hoping to match them have run into opposition from central government.

Since 2015, local authorities have been forced to apply to the secretary of state for permission to license landlords if the scheme affects more than 20% of the homes in the borough or its geographical area.

Housing minister Brandon Lewis wrote to local authorities in March 2015 to warn them of an amendment to licensing rules. He said: “The blanket licensing approach adopted by some local authorities has major drawbacks. This is because it impacts on all landlords and places additional burdens on reputable landlords who are already fully compliant with their obligations, thereby creating additional unnecessary costs for reputable landlords which are generally passed on to tenants through higher rents.

“The vast majority of landlords provide a good service and the government does not believe it is right to impose unnecessary additional costs on them, or their tenants. Such an approach is disproportionate and unfairly penalises good landlords.”"

 

The government would have add point if the bad landlords were a tiny minority, but with a third of properties being substandard, this is needed. 

We wouldn't do away with MOT tests for cars if it was shown that two thirds passed without further work required. 

Clearly the government is treading carefully around landlords. Perhaps they don't want another letter from Ros.

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8 minutes ago, Ah-so said:

The government would have add point if the bad landlords were a tiny minority, but with a third of properties being substandard, this is needed. 

We wouldn't do away with MOT tests for cars if it was shown that two thirds passed without further work required. 

Clearly the government is treading carefully around landlords. Perhaps they don't want another letter from Ros.

The current Government doesn't care about tenants, despite the occasional bit of lip service to try to make it look as though they do.

It's partly psephology - landlords are more likely than tenants to vote Tory - and partly dogma - landlords own property and therefore, per se, matter; tenants, by the same token, don't and don't.

Cars and MOT's.  One can only think that even the Tories have worked out that a vehicle with clapped out brakes might plough into their car on the open road. They don't see themselves ever renting from a crap landlord and therefore don't give a stuff.

 

Edit: splung

Edited by Snugglybear

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19 minutes ago, Ah-so said:

The government would have add point if the bad landlords were a tiny minority, but with a third of properties being substandard, this is needed. 

They'd still be lying because this:

28 minutes ago, Snugglybear said:

...which are generally passed on to tenants through higher rents.

is a lie.  That is, it isn't true and they know it isn't true. 

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2 hours ago, Maynardgravy said:

You have to be a certain type of person to be able to treat fellow humans this way. We live in a society that rewards nastiness and selfishness.

When you have gross yields circa 5%,it's hardly surprising that LL's choose not to maintain properties.

1 hour ago, Ah-so said:

"The Independent revealed last month that almost a third of private rented homes in England, totalling 1.4 million properties, are currently substandard, while 17 per cent contain the most dangerous type of safety hazard"

I missed this when it came out, and even I am shocked at this news. Only licencing of every private landlord can help sort this out, along with checks before any property is rented out. 

Absolutely.It's amazing that LL's are l;eft to self police to such an extent

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22 minutes ago, DrBuyToLeech said:

They'd still be lying because this:

is a lie.  That is, it isn't true and they know it isn't true. 

To be pedantic, I didn't say that.  I quoted the Guardian, which quoted part of the content of a letter written by Brandon Lewis.

Though your point stands.  It's what the Government says.  In an attempt to frame their own implacable resistance to registering and licensing all landlords as a favour to tenants.  

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42 minutes ago, Snugglybear said:

To be pedantic, I didn't say that.  I quoted the Guardian, which quoted part of the content of a letter written by Brandon Lewis.

Though your point stands.  It's what the Government says.  In an attempt to frame their own implacable resistance to registering and licensing all landlords as a favour to tenants.  

Sorry, that's an artefact of the quoting system, I wasn't attributing it to you, or really criticising what you wrote, I was criticising the original quote. 

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I wonder what percentage of privately owned homes are substandard and if substandard always matters.  Sadly meeting the correct standards is not always safe so could the reverse - not meeting the standards is not always dangerous.

 

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