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Mikhail Liebenstein

14 year old Lithium Ion Battery still works well

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I am guessing a lot of tech enthusiasts on here might have heard about the 116 year old light bulb that is still functioning https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest-lasting_light_bulbs and I kind of get it with light bulbs. They are fairly simple tech, and if not made to burn too bright could go on for a long time as long as the seal holds.

What I find more fascinating is the battery on my 14 year old Panasonic LUMIX Digital Camera.(DMC-FZ20) that still works (Lithium Ion).

It is the original battery and the thing is still going and still takes a full charge. The camera and battery had been almost in cold storage since about 2007 when I got a proper SLR, though I periodically checked it to make sure it was topped up. Anyway, I've given it to my 6 year old as his first camera.

i am pretty amazed, as I used to do a bit of work with on battery chemistry. Li-ions don't like deep discharge, though perhaps this was avoided and they are normally only good for so many cycles.

The only explanation I have is that it was well made. It was made in Japan I believe, and in general I still think Japanese quality exceeds anything coming out of China in terms of build quality- the Chinese tend to be better at doing it cheaply which is probably a more success sales strategy.

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1 hour ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

 Li-ions don't like deep discharge, though perhaps this was avoided and they are normally only good for so many cycles.

Does the electronics say they're empty before they really are to avoid that? They'll still drain when not used, but it would lengthen the lifetime of regularly used ones.

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1 minute ago, Riedquat said:

Does the electronics say they're empty before they really are to avoid that? They'll still drain when not used, but it would lengthen the lifetime of regularly used ones.

Yes, they do and they also include safety features too in the electronics.

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As mentioned, cell protection circuitry quality / cell construction quality was probably a major factor.

Also probably your background in cell chemistry has been a factor. You probably looked after it unconsciously, a process that ignorance would not have facilitated.

But nonetheless, it's impressive.

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The lithium battery on my late-1990s camcorder still works, but doesn't last anywhere near as long as it used to. The camcorder does too, but the mikes have failed and the tape heads get dirty fast (probably because of the 20-year-old tapes).

Sony used to build them to last in those days.

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17 minutes ago, MarkG said:

The lithium battery on my late-1990s camcorder still works, but doesn't last anywhere near as long as it used to. The camcorder does too, but the mikes have failed and the tape heads get dirty fast (probably because of the 20-year-old tapes).

Sony used to build them to last in those days.

Just about everything used to be 'built to last' once upon a time - all the way up to houses!

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57 minutes ago, anonguest said:

Just about everything used to be 'built to last' once upon a time - all the way up to houses!

I wouldn't be surprised, not that I'll get a chance to find out, if by the year 2500 there are more 19th century houses in Britain than 20th.

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8 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

I wouldn't be surprised, not that I'll get a chance to find out, if by the year 2500 there are more 19th century houses in Britain than 20th.

Whaddya mean by the year 2500?  I wouldn't be surprised if by the year 2050 there are more 19th century houses remaining habitable than post-1985 built houses!

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On 8/27/2017 at 11:26 AM, Riedquat said:

Does the electronics say they're empty before they really are to avoid that?

Lithium batteries become useless if discharged below 3.2v / cell so "0" will usually be 3.6v or so. They also don't like holding charges above 70-80% for any length of time much either which is why some cleverer laptops have the option to only charge them to 80%.

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On 29/08/2017 at 6:43 AM, goldbug9999 said:

Lithium batteries become useless if discharged below 3.2v / cell so "0" will usually be 3.6v or so. They also don't like holding charges above 70-80% for any length of time much either which is why some cleverer laptops have the option to only charge them to 80%.

Also watch out for repeated low temperature charging which will cause Lithium plating of the anode and thereby cause a safety risk, as well as electro-static discharges that can damaged protection circuits.

Better quality batteries (i.e. mostly with Japanese electronics) tends to put in good quality well protected circuits. It is the cheap, to a price kit that tends to have the problems.

I am very wary of people  buying replacement Li-Ion cells from Amazon/EBay as generally these will be the cheapest rubbish from Chia. Normally they fail prematurely, but in more severe cases if they are mistreated then they can catch fire or explode.

 

 

 

 

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A couple of years ago I knackered my work mobile by dropping it in a glass of water. As I had one foot out of the door anyway I didn't want the embarrassment of having to ask for a replacement so I pressed an old Nokia 3510i that I'd coincidentally just found in a drawer into service instead. It must have been at least a decade old by that point. Standby life had dropped to maybe 3 days instead of 5, but it would get through a day of work calls no problem.

I then gave it to my mum so she could donate it to someone in Tanzania, so it might even still be going now. If not I daresay shonky knock-off Nokia batteries are easy to come by in Tanz.

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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