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longgone

would you drive a crash repaired car ?

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interesting video`s this guy makes, and to be fair he is a genius with a body jig, but would these cars be safe with another crash ?

i wonder how many cars are driving about that have had most of the front cut away

 

 

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Impressive skills but I wouldn't touch it.

Suppose the real question is what the repaired car looks like if it suffered a similar blow to the original one. Must admit I'd be wondering how the welds on the cut off footwell section would hold up.

Can't really understand how it makes economic sense to repair something like that.

 

edit, surely crumple zones are single use items too?

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If it was just replacing a few body panels with out the cars chassis / underlying structure being damaged then fine.

 

But in the case of that video, he is cutting and welding the chassis.  To be fair that is what people used to do in this country up until about 30 years ago.  But if there was another crash, who knows what would happen (but im sure the car would fair a lot worse due to the repair)

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One more point.  I say I would never ride around in something like that, but I probably take taxis more that I drive nowadays.  

 

With some of the dodgy taxi drivers I have meant, it wouldn't be a massive suprise if they had cut a few corners on their vehicle, and I was riding around in some car that was supposed to be a right off, so they could keep their costs down.

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1 hour ago, The Knimbies who say No said:

Impressive skills but I wouldn't touch it.

Suppose the real question is what the repaired car looks like if it suffered a similar blow to the original one. Must admit I'd be wondering how the welds on the cut off footwell section would hold up.

Can't really understand how it makes economic sense to repair something like that.

These are american crashed cars that get put in containers and shipped to eastern europe and re-registered. The unsuspecting new owners probably can`t even tell they have been fixed. well until you have another smash anyway. 

they have crumple zones for a reason, they will cave in the next time if there is a crash. 

this guy seems to have a plentiful supply of parts to repair these , no doubt nicked cars from the uk get taken to bits to fix these. 

this one is shocking 

 

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A good weld is as strong as original metal, in theory. The car might not crash as well the second time round, but I doubt that would make much difference to the occupants, it would just be even more bent afterwards.

I suspect that this type of repair is only worthwhile in a country where labour is cheap and secondhand cars are expensive, though. In the UK, I don't think anybody would bother doing all that to a BMW 2-series; they might for a Ferrari. I also reckon that that car would have been a category B write-off in the UK due to the roof damage and warping of the chassis, though I'm not an insurance assessor so I could be talking rubbish. If it was, it wouldn't be allowed back on the road here.

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6 hours ago, Rave said:

A good weld is as strong as original metal, in theory. The car might not crash as well the second time round, but I doubt that would make much difference to the occupants, it would just be even more bent afterwards.

I suspect that this type of repair is only worthwhile in a country where labour is cheap and secondhand cars are expensive, though. In the UK, I don't think anybody would bother doing all that to a BMW 2-series; they might for a Ferrari. I also reckon that that car would have been a category B write-off in the UK due to the roof damage and warping of the chassis, though I'm not an insurance assessor so I could be talking rubbish. If it was, it wouldn't be allowed back on the road here.

Cat B's are allowed back on the road.  Only the ABI and internet forums say you can't but VOSA/DVLA and my legal/insurance expert says you can.

Mine was flooded in 2010 but I had it stripped, cleaned and rebuilt.  Driven with MOT/insurance/tax for years afterwards with no problems.

 

 

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12 hours ago, longgone said:

These are american crashed cars that get put in containers and shipped to eastern europe and re-registered. The unsuspecting new owners probably can`t even tell they have been fixed. well until you have another smash anyway. 

they have crumple zones for a reason, they will cave in the next time if there is a crash. 

this guy seems to have a plentiful supply of parts to repair these , no doubt nicked cars from the uk get taken to bits to fix these. 

this one is shocking 

 

Oof, cut and shut alive and well.

Surely can't be too difficult to compel insurance cos to scrap the body shells of write off cars.

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Quote

would you drive a crash repaired car ?

would have expected a little more daring do from the OT, given their interest in SHTF scenarios:

960.jpg

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11 hours ago, VeryMeanReversion said:

Cat B's are allowed back on the road.  Only the ABI and internet forums say you can't but VOSA/DVLA and my legal/insurance expert says you can.

Mine was flooded in 2010 but I had it stripped, cleaned and rebuilt.  Driven with MOT/insurance/tax for years afterwards with no problems.

Interesting to know, cheers! I do occasionally see category B motorbikes which I think it would be a shame not to rescue while idly browsing Copart and the like. Maybe I'll have a go next time!

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4 hours ago, Sledgehead said:

would have expected a little more daring do from the OT, given their interest in SHTF scenarios:

960.jpg

seeing the quality of some polish plumbers, letting them near a car is like playing russian roulette anyway. 

The posting was to highlight the artistic aesthetic quality of the work rather than safety and the integrity of the vehicle. 

 

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On 14/08/2017 at 3:42 AM, Rave said:

A good weld is as strong as original metal, in theory. The car might not crash as well the second time round, but I doubt that would make much difference to the occupants, it would just be even more bent afterwards.

I'd have a concern that any substandard welding would, in the event of a significant impact, potentially turn the foot well into a mass of (effectively) meat cleaver blades that stop moving somewhere past one's ankles...

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43 minutes ago, hp72 said:

I'd have a concern that any substandard welding would, in the event of a significant impact, potentially turn the foot well into a mass of (effectively) meat cleaver blades that stop moving somewhere past one's ankles...

modern cars are designed to squish in certain ways, a good weld is just that a good weld, the structure of the straightened metal is not the same as the original anymore.

both the cars above should have been crushed 

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On 14/08/2017 at 1:07 PM, The Knimbies who say No said:

Oof, cut and shut alive and well.

Surely can't be too difficult to compel insurance cos to scrap the body shells of write off cars.

They are compelled, the car has to go to a scrapyard who send off a scrap notice to the DVLA. But whats to stop them saying it's scrapped, stick it on a lorry and take it to this guy to sell elsewhere? No a lot.

A repair done well is just fine. But cutting huge chunks out of some panels is asking for disaster, it's OK saying a weld is as good as the original metal (it can be better in fact) but sometimes manufacturer build in weak points as crumple zones, potentially you making that stronger is worse than weakening it! I'm restoring an '86 Golf and got a lot of shit for cutting out a lot of the bulkhead and replacing with flat metal sheet as the indentations and there for a reason (strength basically), so how many 30 year old cars are on the road that have been, "meticulously" restored but in reality have been made unsafe int he same way by a well meaning hobbyist (like me)

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Also sure to be more prone to internal hidden corrosion, further weakening the chassis.  There is no way to properly replicate the original anti-corrision once it's all welded up (The heat will always destroy a certain amount)

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My car was an economic right off last year. It had dented wing , cracked head light , end of bonnet was bent and bit took out front tyre.

Four month after I got rid of it I found its been mot again.

I'm not sure how long it was last as it as other stuff wrong with no accident related

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On 8/13/2017 at 11:04 PM, The Knimbies who say No said:

Impressive skills but I wouldn't touch it.

Suppose the real question is what the repaired car looks like if it suffered a similar blow to the original one. Must admit I'd be wondering how the welds on the cut off footwell section would hold up.

Can't really understand how it makes economic sense to repair something like that.

 

edit, surely crumple zones are single use items too?

A decent weld will  be stronger than the parent metal ,way to much BS about this type of repair if it`s done properly 

It`s irrelevant though in the UK and much of Europe as a car with that amount of damage would be in the scrap only category if it has been involved with an insurance company 

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Yep. Repaired my Cat D daily with a few panels and suspension components, looks like someone got greedy and swiped a bank. One day I may even paint the panels the same colour as the rest of the car (couldn't get them in the right paint code as it was only used for a short period before being changed to a different shade). Doesn't look great as its multi colour at the moment but its a lot lower mileage and newer than what I'd have otherwise got for the cash, cosmetics are secondary... its a tool for heavens sake.

My second car is a Cat C, took it up the behind and broke the bumper and rear hatch. Rear hatch panel gap is a bit off but its a track car now, so it really doesn't matter.

Wouldn't be keen on anything with pillar damage or chassis leg damage though. Airbag deployment (passenger one on many cars means new dash and smashes the windscreen) can often be enough to push a car from a repair to Cat D/C, even if it just needs a few panels up front.

 

 

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