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What`s the backup plan if the crash never comes

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:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: 

I think you mean,

What`s the  plan when the crash comes.


The crash could be a HPC or it could be an economic, bank or government.

Either way, make sure you have a plan, backup or otherwise.

 

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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23 minutes ago, TheCountOfNowhere said:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: 

I think you mean,

What`s the  plan when the crash comes.


The crash could be a HPC or it could be an economic, bank or government.

Either way, make sure you have a plan, backup or otherwise.

 

my plan is working . chill out sit back and think of the cash lost by not buying and reselling . crash or no crash still fooked. 

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Already number 2. 

Couldn't pay me to come back and live in the UK. 

House prices are scandalous. Even the cheap areas are expensive

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6 hours ago, wotsthat said:

2

And it still could be a 2 even if prices fell 30%, I have a handful of places within a few hours flight of where I am now that are light years  ahead in quality of life and serenity.

Any clues pls?..... plenty of nice provincial towns located close to great cities like Strasbourg, Lyon, Munich, Barcelona, Girona, Milan, Padova etc etc....Lon-done....just why?!

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OK, I don't want to make this a BREXIT page but it seems the majority of people has mentioned option 2 (emigration). Now to get emigration status to another country relies on several things i.e. skills, age etc. I am assuming that the majority of people would make the decision to FORMALLY emigrate post 30's due to becoming disenfranchised with the UK...questions/thoughts:-

a) Will your 'choice' of where to emigrate be restricted/very limited due to the age implication?

b.) Before Brexit we had a wide 'no stings attached' choice, thinking post-Brexit do people think this be be severely limited?

c) In regards to a and b. above will the main restriction to emigration be based upon you ability to support yourself i.e. limited min funds to gain residency?

d) Are things really 'greener on the other side' i.e. in UK in old age we have the security of free-healthcare and support services?

 

Me?...considering option 2 but have yet to find the right place AND/OR be convinced that retirement elsewhere would really offer the benefits highlighted in d above...however much we complain about how shi@@y the UK is becoming.

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On 21/07/2017 at 0:26 AM, wotsthat said:

For me it's Normandy, I now have three friends living out there in lovely big farm houses with plenty of land, and the icing on the cake is the French really love the English in that part of France :)

Kidding, part of me loves the rude side of the French towards us, we deserve it.

Why I like it?

1.  close to the UK and easy to get back to the UK

2. You might as well be on a different planet even though you are less than 100 miles away from the UK coast, 1950's Britian in some places.

3. won't tell you prices of Normandy property, just google, will make you weep.

4 The Food, Oh Gawd Blimey!  Just amazing(coming off a 2 day fast)

 

Look I could go onto 100 reasons, it's a place where people have life in them and it's a place to live.

Why do you say 'we deserve it'?  

My brother and SiL have had a house in that area for many years and the locals have always been very friendly.  Mind you b and SiL do speak the language reasonably well and have always made an effort to be good neighbours. 

They got their house for relative peanuts, since it was a wreck and had been on the market for years - the locals didn't want it.  Prices in the area are cheap but that's at least partly because there are so few jobs.  When a neighbour lost his job not long ago it was a huge worry for the family.  

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A friend has a farm in Normandy, I've visited a few times. The locals love the English, despise the Parisians and hate the Germans. Great place if you're healthy but not a good place to be feeble imo, the winters can be savage.

 

 

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1 hour ago, John51 said:

A friend has a farm in Normandy, I've visited a few times. The locals love the English, despise the Parisians and hate the Germans.

Years ago we didn't have much money so 2 mates and I would drive around Normandy on holiday, camping but not on proper pay-for campsites. We would just knock on door of likely-looking farm and ask if we could pitch up in a spare field. In the summer we used to get pretty tanned with sun-bleached hair and get very hostile response? "Allemands?" i.e. they assumed we were German. We learnt to reverse the car up so they could see the GB plate and then it was totally different, kiss on cheeks, have some wine, all that. Felt a bit guilty about encouraging their stereotypes, I mean so what if we had been German we were not old enough even then to be connected with WW2, but in practical terms it was a wonderful bonus. Strangest thing that ever happened they said no problem we could camp round the back through the orchard. Had to drive crunchily through 500 meters of ankle deep apples and car smelled of apple juice for weeks after.

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Most English speaking countries have the same problems with high house prices and they'd be my first chojce...as is, seems pointless. Continental Europe works fine if you're in a field where you can remotely work (lots of programmers on here I think) but for most jobs is an unavoidable problem. I speak a reasonable amount of French and Spanish and could probably just about motivate myself to become fluent (enough) but if I'm honest I'd doubt I'd have the stamina to learn a new language from scratch now. Perhaps in retirement but not while working full-time.

 

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On 24/07/2017 at 3:11 PM, wotsthat said:

The English of late have been so put down by so many different  people, MSM, we put ourselves down even, we are  called lazy for example with the way our welfare works and the way we are compared to the Eastern Europeans. But I have no doubt in my head that the vast majority iwell nto the high 90% are willing to do 50 plus hours per week work if only they had decent homes to return to.

Aye, we're a hard working people, I've no doubt. Unfortunately we have created a small "idle class", completely distinct from the working class, that is non-representative. This resulting from not having a welfare state but a benefits state. Most of us slog it out knowing that we don't tick any of the boxes for state support - we'll lose everything before we see a penny. The benefits state meanwhile rewards you the more helpless you become and the more reckless the decisions you make. A perverse incentive to make yourself as unemployable as possible.

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On 7/24/2017 at 1:27 PM, Funn3r said:

Years ago we didn't have much money so 2 mates and I would drive around Normandy on holiday, camping but not on proper pay-for campsites. We would just knock on door of likely-looking farm and ask if we could pitch up in a spare field. In the summer we used to get pretty tanned with sun-bleached hair and get very hostile response? "Allemands?" i.e. they assumed we were German. We learnt to reverse the car up so they could see the GB plate and then it was totally different, kiss on cheeks, have some wine, all that. Felt a bit guilty about encouraging their stereotypes, I mean so what if we had been German we were not old enough even then to be connected with WW2, but in practical terms it was a wonderful bonus. Strangest thing that ever happened they said no problem we could camp round the back through the orchard. Had to drive crunchily through 500 meters of ankle deep apples and car smelled of apple juice for weeks after.

Where my mates farm is, harvesting apples was done by laying down tarps under the tree then hitting branches with a stick. The apples were then piled up in a pyramid close to the entrance gate. Some days later, they were taken away by the Cider Man. For every ton of apples taken, he would later leave a ton of cider. The farmers would distill the cider to make Calvados. Just about the roughest spirit ever. We found some 10 yo Calvados in the barn and it was on a par with the cheapest whisky you could buy. I did try commercial Calvados once, it was like paint stripper.

If a Parisian buys a holiday home there, they spend nothing in the village which causes resentment. My mate is a builder and brought in builder mates from England for the renovations, which they didn't like. We were all free spenders at the local shop though, that helped. None of the farmers could weld. Can't imagine that on an English farm. He'd do all their welding jobs, including tractor exhausts, and they'd pay him in firewood.

We passed a stranded German motorist one morning. Saw him again on the way back, 8 hours later.

 

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