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Iwenti

PureVPN offering advance features, is the price good enough?

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I got this email from Pure VPN (VPN I use) saying they're going 360 degrees. I could only wonder what it meant until I went into more details.

So, they're launching a complete new security solution that includes IPS/IDS protection, Anti-Virus, Parental Control, AD-Blocking & Apps Data Usage Control. That is pretty amazing for a VPN app.

And to top it, people already subscribed to Pure VPN will be getting the premium upgrade for free. Also, if you subscribe to their VPN by 30th June you get the upgrade for free too.

The new features will be launched at $8 per month on top of VPN plans, but existing users will be eligible to get an absolutely free upgrade provided they get PureVPN before June 30th.

Is the price they are offering good enough to vouch for this?

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My first thought is that a key reason for using a VPN is so that what you're doing isn't monitored or logged.

If that's one of your objectives, then it's time to find a new VPN.

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On 6/30/2017 at 9:17 PM, DTMark said:

My first thought is that a key reason for using a VPN is so that what you're doing isn't monitored or logged.

If that's one of your objectives, then it's time to find a new VPN.

Actually I have been using it for quite sometime and the advanced features they are offering are quite competitive in this price, I'll have to find a solid reason to change my VPN ;)

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On 30/06/2017 at 5:17 PM, DTMark said:

My first thought is that a key reason for using a VPN is so that what you're doing isn't monitored or logged.

If that's one of your objectives, then it's time to find a new VPN.

Everything's already monitored and logged! The NSA has been able to crack Diffie-Hellman-1024 at Oak Ridge for at least five years. This paper argues persuasively that 768-bit is well within the reach of modest academic resources today (2015) i.e. just about anybody with a few $ million, a bunch of asic chips.

And here's a superb piece from de speigel (2014) documenting among other things the NSA's routine subversion of VPN.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/inside-the-nsa-s-war-on-internet-security-a-1010361.html

Quote

One example is virtual private networks (VPN), which are often used by companies and institutions operating from multiple offices and locations. A VPN theoretically creates a secure tunnel between two points on the Internet. All data is channeled through that tunnel, protected by cryptography. When it comes to the level of privacy offered here, virtual is the right word, too. This is because the NSA operates a large-scale VPN exploitation project to crack large numbers of connections, allowing it to intercept the data exchanged inside the VPN -- including, for example, the Greek government's use of VPNs. The team responsible for the exploitation of those Greek VPN communications consisted of 12 people, according to an NSA document SPIEGEL has seen.

The NSA also targeted SecurityKiss, a VPN service in Ireland. The following fingerprint for Xkeyscore, the agency's powerful spying tool, was reported to be tested and working against the service:

 

fingerprint('encryption/securitykiss/x509') = $pkcs and ( ($tcp and from_port(443)) or ($udp and (from_port(123) or from_por (5000) or from_port(5353)) ) ) and (not (ip_subnet('10.0.0.0/8' or '172.16.0.0/12' or '192.168.0.0/16' )) ) and 'RSA Generated Server Certificate'c and 'Dublin1'c and 'GL CA'c;

According to an NSA document dating from late 2009, the agency was processing 1,000 requests an hour to decrypt VPN connections. This number was expected to increase to 100,000 per hour by the end of 2011. The aim was for the system to be able to completely process "at least 20 percent" of these requests, meaning the data traffic would have to be decrypted and reinjected. In other words, by the end of 2011, the NSA's plans called for simultaneously surveilling 20,000 supposedly secure VPN communications per hour.

VPN connections can be based on a number of different protocols. The most widely used ones are called Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Internet Protocol Security (Ipsec). Both seem to pose few problems for the NSA spies if they really want to crack a connection. Experts have considered PPTP insecure for some time now, but it is still in use in many commercial systems. The authors of one NSA presentation boast of a project called FOURSCORE that stores information including decrypted PPTP VPN metadata.

Using a number of different programs, they claim to have succeeded in penetrating numerous networks. Among those surveilled were the Russian carrier Transaero Airlines, Royal Jordanian Airlines as well as Moscow-based telecommunications firm Mir Telematiki. Another success touted is the NSA's surveillance of the internal communications of diplomats and government officials from Afghanistan, Pakistan and Turkey.

Ipsec as a protocol seems to create slightly more trouble for the spies. But the NSA has the resources to actively attack routers involved in the communication process to get to the keys to unlock the encryption rather than trying to break it, courtesy of the unit called Tailored Access Operations: "TAO got on the router through which banking traffic of interest flows," it says in one presentation.

 

 

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On 7/6/2017 at 4:00 PM, zugzwang said:

Everything's already monitored and logged! The NSA has been able to crack Diffie-Hellman-1024 at Oak Ridge for at least five years. This paper argues persuasively that 768-bit is well within the reach of modest academic resources today (2015) i.e. just about anybody with a few $ million, a bunch of asic chips.

And here's a superb piece from de speigel (2014) documenting among other things the NSA's routine subversion of VPN.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/inside-the-nsa-s-war-on-internet-security-a-1010361.html

 

I don't know about others but for me, I'm not and will not use a VPN to carry out a activity which might seem fishy to the government and agencies and ring red bells on NSA.

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24 minutes ago, Iwenti said:

I don't know about others but for me, I'm not and will not use a VPN to carry out a activity which might seem fishy to the government and agencies and ring red bells on NSA.

Best to think of the Internet as a giant, batch processing computer owned by the US Dept of Defense. Privacy? Security? Trust? Forget it.

And being digital, liable to fail without warning at any time. I note with grim satisfaction that the courier TNT Express is still not able to offer a service to its UK customers some two weeks after being knocked offline by the NotPetya ransomware attack. A cyberweapon created with tools the NSA spooks left lying around! What incalculable folly the stampede into digital networking has been.

 

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