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Sisyphus

Bbc Reporting Biased? Prove It!

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A lot of people on this forum seem to think that the BBC are one sided in their commentary on the housing market and factors, such as interest rates, that affect it .

I must admit that it is the impression that I have had too on occasion. It is a serious matter as "Impartiality & Diversity of Opinion" are written into their editorial guidelines.

here

The public at large don't believe that they would be anything but impartial.

So, I suggest that if we believe this to be true, we should make an attempt to document it and if we can gather enough compelling evidence we could present a case.

For this to work we can't be selective, we would need to document both bullish and bearish spin.

I'll start the ball rolling with Wednesday's:

Dove splits MPC for second month

"It looks like the MPC are playing their cards very close to their chest, with a bias towards easing still lurking beneath the surface," said David Brown, economist with Bear Stearns.

"We think that the odds probably still fall on the March MPC meeting for the next quarter-point cut."

8-1 is hardly a split or a bias towards easing, more like an overwhelming majority not to ease.

And maybe they were also unlucky to quote one of the very few economists who think that rates will drop in March.

But they have failed to report on yesterdays plunging bond market and its implication for future rate decisions.

There must be some balanced reporting without spin, but I just can't see it.

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There was an post on here where a BBC representive admitted to giving greater weight to mortgage providers then to independent economists..

and also admitted in the same letter that he understood that sentiment can influence the market..

It was a clear admission..

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how about the fact that i have seen nothing on the BBC site about the Halifax report showing -5% for Bromley (south london) and as low as -10% Somerset

Edited by Kam

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There was an post on here where a BBC representive admitted to giving greater weight to mortgage providers then to independent economists..

and also admitted in the same letter that he understood that sentiment can influence the market..

It was a clear admission..

This is the letter you refer to although others have recieved similar letters in response to their complaints:

Dear Ms Smith

Thanks for your e-mail.

Well, the Halifax is one of the largest mortgage lenders in the UK, and

their assessment of the housing market is an interesting contribution to

the vigorous debate where this market is heading.

We also quote an economics consultancy, Capital Economics, which

released a different forecast on the same day.

And that's all we did - report that different groups of experts have

different views as to how the market will develop.

Accurate economic data are difficult to compile, and very often - like

the data from the Land Registry - are months late.

A lot of the activity in financial markets - not just property, but

stocks, bonds and currencies as well - is driven by forecasts, e.g. from

analysts, ratings agencies, economists.

In my opinion such assessments and forecasts are indeed news, and from

our experience they are also of great interest to many of our readers.

On balance the views of the country's largest mortgage lender are of

more importance than that of a group of City economists - although both

are worth reporting.

There is only that much that can be put into a brief headline without

making it meaningless, and I believe it is correct to lead the story

with the Halifax comments.

Regards,

Tim Weber

Business Editor

BBC News Interactive www.bbc.co.uk/business

On another matter, it is not just bias in an article on house prices that gets me, rather it is the way so many BBC articles (not about property) end up curving round towards property and specifically property speculation as a good thing.For example, the following article on female millionaires:

BBC Article

This particular article may not be the best example of this but there have been some articles where the reporter appears to have done a back flip to get the story round to how we can all make money out of investing in property.

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The BBC aren't biased on this issue per se but always quote the vested interests as there's rarely anyone else producing things to quote on this subject.....

Edited by Michael

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On another matter, it is not just bias in an article on house prices that gets me, rather it is the way so many BBC articles (not about property) end up curving round towards property and specifically property speculation as a good thing.For example, the following article on female millionaires:

BBC Article

This particular article may not be the best example of this but there have been some articles where the reporter appears to have done a back flip to get the story round to how we can all make money out of investing in property.

I've noticed this before, it'll normally be something about money or making it and then the second to last paragraph will mention something about it going into property, I'll have to see if I can find the two articles I'm thinking about.

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They are biased but mainly because they are writing / talking about subjects they know nothing about. Apart from the odd good Journalist / Reporter for instance Evan Davies you have utter crap like Declan Curry. Alot of the time they just don't have the knowledge or intelligence to know what is a vested opinion. Best TV news is C4 and anyone wanting more than a comic book approach shouldn't read the bbc website.

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They are biased but mainly because they are writing / talking about subjects they know nothing about. Apart from the odd good Journalist / Reporter for instance Evan Davies you have utter crap like Declan Curry.

Totally agree. I worked for the BBC for a while as a journalist. Left because it was embarrassingly bad.

They are not biased on purpose. The journalists are generally well educated but have no specific knowledge on subjects they report on. Combine this with tight time frames and the need to churn news then they will do the easiest thing and report press releases and ask glib questions.

I think once the cream such as Paxman et al have retired they should shut news and current affairs down or privatise it because there is no way I'm going to continue funding Declan Curry's skiing trips to Switzerland.

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Dunno about BBC's reporting being one-sided, though i came across this News Report on some website, must say, i applaud the Journalist whoever wrote it on dropping the fat & drivel & getting to the point of the matter in this weeks most important news subject! Latest Thames Whale Report

Edited by A Fool & His Borrowed Money

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After the number of warnings from utterly impartial, objective sources – the IMF, OECD and World Bank for instance – as to the overvalued state of the UK housing market – that Barbara Goldsmith “persuade the FTBs to buy somewhere, anywhere” ½ hour prime time infomercial that the BBC aired last year was the most jaw droppingly partizan piece of propaganda I have seen from any broadcasting outfit during this whole mad period.

If the housing market does indeed crash at some point in the next few years that will be exhibit number one when our national broadcaster gets called to account for its part in this ludicrous mess.

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A lot of people on this forum seem to think that the BBC are one sided in their commentary on the housing market and factors, such as interest rates, that affect it .

I must admit that it is the impression that I have had too on occasion. It is a serious matter as "Impartiality & Diversity of Opinion" are written into their editorial guidelines.

here

The public at large don't believe that they would be anything but impartial.

So, I suggest that if we believe this to be true, we should make an attempt to document it and if we can gather enough compelling evidence we could present a case.

For this to work we can't be selective, we would need to document both bullish and bearish spin.

I'll start the ball rolling with Wednesday's:

Dove splits MPC for second month

8-1 is hardly a split or a bias towards easing, more like an overwhelming majority not to ease.

And maybe they were also unlucky to quote one of the very few economists who think that rates will drop in March.

But they have failed to report on yesterdays plunging bond market and its implication for future rate decisions.

There must be some balanced reporting without spin, but I just can't see it.

I cannot fathom the level of B%^&%$&$%KS in both the BBC and other news sources.

the Interest rate curve is FLat Flat Flat

June 06 LFL Flat

Sep 06 LFL Flat

Dec 07 LFL Flat

you getting the picture now you arrogant so called journos. The market expects no more cuts in the short term. period get over it and start doing your jobs.

The only way you can even slightly point to a cut is to wheel out the yeild curve. which is now HeaVILY INVERTED

this means recession you morons ! what part of recession don't you understand ? ecomonically we are up poop creek.

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A lot of people on this forum seem to think that the BBC are one sided in their commentary on the housing market and factors, such as interest rates, that affect it .

I must admit that it is the impression that I have had too on occasion. It is a serious matter as "Impartiality & Diversity of Opinion" are written into their editorial guidelines.

here

The public at large don't believe that they would be anything but impartial.

So, I suggest that if we believe this to be true, we should make an attempt to document it and if we can gather enough compelling evidence we could present a case.

For this to work we can't be selective, we would need to document both bullish and bearish spin.

I'll start the ball rolling with Wednesday's:

Dove splits MPC for second month

8-1 is hardly a split or a bias towards easing, more like an overwhelming majority not to ease.

And maybe they were also unlucky to quote one of the very few economists who think that rates will drop in March.

But they have failed to report on yesterdays plunging bond market and its implication for future rate decisions.

There must be some balanced reporting without spin, but I just can't see it.

THAT'S THE PROBLEM!!!.

most of the sheep are completely oblivious to the influence of telly....even some of the "scientific" studies have said viewing material does not(ahem!!!),influence behaviour.....so it's just coincidence that our kids are more voilent at precisely the same time as grand theft auto and gangsta rap become popular!!!

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There are 8 regular BBC television programmes currently running on how to invest in property here there and everywhere - all very easily identified on the BBC website since the plethora of "home investment" offerings have their own section.

Not one specifically targeted to dealing with debt / managing repossessions - at least that I can find on the BBC website.

Editorial priority I would suggest.

You decide.

EDIT:

Oops. Sorry. One: Beat the Baliff

And in contrast to the happy attractive people hosting the others the pic on this one shows a woman who looks like she should be an on duty cop - really enticing. NOT.

Edited by Elizabeth

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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