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 Smoking may be banned in new council homes, says health expert

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2 hours ago, Odakyu-sen said:

How are the authorities going to enforce any such ban?

Maybe put some screens in the rooms so they can keep an eye on you ?

On the health front they could combine this with a daily exercise regime !

With all the elections and referendums going on - these screens could perhaps also be used to provide ongoing political party broadcasts. 

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3 hours ago, Odakyu-sen said:

How are the authorities going to enforce any such ban?

gogglebox meets 1984.

they'll be incentivised with free smart tv in every room, amazon echo and smartmeters.

in the very,very small print of the contract that hardly anybody ever reads,in the most opaque legalese,it will have clauses about agreeing to have your activities constantly monitored and selling your soul to baelzebub.

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3 hours ago, Odakyu-sen said:

How are the authorities going to enforce any such ban?

My first thought too. Also as they probably would only find out when the tenant leaves how would you clean the house?

Nicotine sensors in new builds?

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Non smoking clauses are pretty standard in private tenancies.  Lose your deposit if you 'damage' the furnishings with smoke. 

Pretty easy to tell by smell if people break the rule.  But do council tenants pay deposits?

why should those getting housing subsidised by the state get a better standard than those having to pay privately?

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This is probably a child health issue as much as anything else.

I never smoked inside, even in my own house (apart from Christmas!)

Don't see this as a bad thing.

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23 minutes ago, CunningPlan said:

This is probably a child health issue as much as anything else.

I never smoked inside, even in my own house (apart from Christmas!)

Don't see this as a bad thing.

Smoking is a bad thing. Such interference in peoples' private lives is a worse thing.

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Just now, Riedquat said:

Smoking is a bad thing. Such interference in peoples' private lives is a worse thing.

It is not their private life. If you rent a car / hotel room etc, they will tell you that you cannot smoke. That is reasonable.

If you own a house, fair enough, puff away. 

If you rent a house off someone else, they have the right to tell you not to damage that house. Or impose a financial sanction if you do.

 

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3 minutes ago, CunningPlan said:

It is not their private life. If you rent a car / hotel room etc, they will tell you that you cannot smoke. That is reasonable.

If you own a house, fair enough, puff away. 

If you rent a house off someone else, they have the right to tell you not to damage that house. Or impose a financial sanction if you do.

As has been mentioned on here often enough before, when you rent it's your home even if it's someone else's house. Don't see why council houses should be any different.

All they should have a right to do is expect the house back in decent condition when you leave.

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1 minute ago, Riedquat said:

As has been mentioned on here often enough before, when you rent it's your home even if it's someone else's house. Don't see why council houses should be any different.

All they should have a right to do is expect the house back in decent condition when you leave.

That is fair enough and I understand this would not be retrospective.

But as a comparison, if the lease said you could not conduct a business from the property, repair vehicles on the driveway, hang washing from the balcony or whatever, and you knew this before you accepted the property, would that be reasonable or could you just ignore it?

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2 minutes ago, CunningPlan said:

That is fair enough and I understand this would not be retrospective.

But as a comparison, if the lease said you could not conduct a business from the property, repair vehicles on the driveway, hang washing from the balcony or whatever, and you knew this before you accepted the property, would that be reasonable or could you just ignore it?

All of those have potential impact outside the house, on other people in the area. It's not something it's possible to make a general statement on because it depends so much upon the specific circumstances (although if "no repairing vehicles on the driveway" could be taken as "don't even do minor work on your own car" then I can't see that as ever being reasonable).

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Just now, Riedquat said:

All of those have potential impact outside the house, on other people in the area. It's not something it's possible to make a general statement on because it depends so much upon the specific circumstances (although if "no repairing vehicles on the driveway" could be taken as "don't even do minor work on your own car" then I can't see that as ever being reasonable).

I think we will agree to differ.

For me, I am VERY allergic to cats. If I rent a property that has had a cat living there in even the last five years I would struggle.

Therefore I seek out a landlord that has implemented a no pets policy. If the previous tenant had owned a cat it would seriously affect me.

I would agree that if the property was returned to its original state then it should be fine - but it is even harder to get rid of traces of a smoker after a few years than it is a cat.

Maybe a £5k deposit to cover the damage?

 

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This might sound a bit harsh but constraining everyone in order to deal with exceptional circumstances is no way to run the world, and the UK is already massively over-regulated and over-nannied (in all the wrong areas).

Edited by Riedquat

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46 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

All of those have potential impact outside the house, on other people in the area. It's not something it's possible to make a general statement on because it depends so much upon the specific circumstances (although if "no repairing vehicles on the driveway" could be taken as "don't even do minor work on your own car" then I can't see that as ever being reasonable).

As I unfortunately know now in the flat I live in. Smoking in a flat can impact other surrounding flats.

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36 minutes ago, ccc said:

As I unfortunately know now in the flat I live in. Smoking in a flat can impact other surrounding flats.

Then that's a fair reason to have a no smoking rule in those flats. It doesn't justify a blanket one in all properties though, whatever the "He has it so why can't I, everything should be exactly the same everywhere!" crowd think.

Edited by Riedquat

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We have people who have been living as single and claiming benefits for over 30 years in council houses when their partners have been there all along.The council have caught zero of them.You could hold a smoking party,sent invites to the town hall,and you would be still ok.They would forget to act on it.

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41 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Then that's a fair reason to have a no smoking rule in those flats. It doesn't justify a blanket one in all properties though, whatever the "He has it so why can't I, everything should be exactly the same everywhere!" crowd think.

So are the taxpayers meant to stump up the additional cleaning costs at the end of the tenancy?

I know this is a US site but it seems that the cost will be around $8-10,000.

Fine if the tenant pays. Not if the taxpayer pays.

 https://www.propertymanagementinsider.com/the-high-cost-of-allowing-smoking-in-apartments

I presume you are also happy with parents smoking in cars with young children?

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As someone who used to live in a ex council flat, it would be great if smoking in flats were banned.  Saying that as smoking pot is banned - it didn't seem to make much difference.

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2 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Then that's a fair reason to have a no smoking rule in those flats. It doesn't justify a blanket one in all properties though, whatever the "He has it so why can't I, everything should be exactly the same everywhere!" crowd think.

Who decides what 'those flats' are ? You have a team continually going around every single block of flats in a town checking any tiny little gaps or holes to see if the smell of smoke 9Or anything else) is seeping through ? And then if there is - either getting it fixed or putting it on the no smoking' list ? Totally unworkable.

Trust me - I am generally on your side of things when it comes to non Government involvement as much as is humanely possible. But the pub/restaurant smoking ban has been ******ing brilliant - and this is the opinion of most smokers too !!

Not to mention the smell - the fire risk in what is essentially a big shared house (That's all a block of flats is really) is huge with people walking about with fags 24/7.

I'm against anything that is done in a block of flats that directly affects those living around them. Smells are just one aspect of that. Noise is another.

You may get smells of cooking coming through to your flat of course - but at least that's usually going to be nice. The smell of stale old fag smoke is repulsive. And again - this is something most smokers completely agree on.

 

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1 hour ago, EmmaRoid said:

100% behind @Riedquat whilst it's  still legal they shouldn't be able to stop you in social housing.

(I don't think it shouldn't be enforceable in the PRS either)

Seriously :o

You do realise what the P stands for in that PRS !! I'm hardly one to usually stick up for landlords - but ****** me. Clearly you have never been into a flat where people have smoked in it regularly. Its not a case of just opening the windows for a day. It infests everywhere.

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If there serious about it it will be written into the tenancy agreement and become part of the routine inspection.

If there are signs of smoking and they will be able to tell you forfeit the tenancy  and are out.

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