Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
fru-gal

Voter registration soars among students with 55% backing Labour

Recommended Posts

Yeah ...... Im not sure that young really back Jezza.

Why should they? Hes an old, useless ,entitled tw@t.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of curiosity I took a look at #ge2017 on Twitter 'cos that's were it's happening - allegedly.

Well, on the basis of what I saw Labour should walk this election - no sweat.

So what's going on? I'm not convinced that the "internet" is changing anyone's voting intentions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/9/2017 at 2:17 PM, Broken biscuit said:

Out of curiosity I took a look at #ge2017 on Twitter 'cos that's were it's happening - allegedly.

Well, on the basis of what I saw Labour should walk this election - no sweat.

So what's going on? I'm not convinced that the "internet" is changing anyone's voting intentions.

Same as if you believe the Question Time audience represent the populace then Labour would win by a landslide every time.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/05/2017 at 9:42 AM, spyguy said:

Yeah ...... Im not sure that young really back Jezza.

Why should they? Hes an old, useless ,entitled tw@t.

I don't see him on TV, and he doesn't get much radio coverage, so I don't get a strong sense of his character. However, I like my impression of him: that he's a stubborn, grumpy old git, with no respect for the slick operators of politics who trade their beliefs for a little temporary power. A sort of anti-hero of the old people's home. If you think mainstream politics needs a boot up its backside, that might be attractive: not in the Trump-as-wrecking-ball sense that wonderpup described, but in the sense of feeling a common cause with someone else who has been sidelined from power; even if the overlap of his views with yours is imperfect. He has also been almost alone in raising housing as a political issue that needs to be addressed; certainly the only major figure in politics to do so consistently, rather than swaying with the media winds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Toast said:

I don't see him on TV, and he doesn't get much radio coverage, so I don't get a strong sense of his character. However, I like my impression of him: that he's a stubborn, grumpy old git, with no respect for the slick operators of politics who trade their beliefs for a little temporary power. A sort of anti-hero of the old people's home. If you think mainstream politics needs a boot up its backside, that might be attractive: not in the Trump-as-wrecking-ball sense that wonderpup described, but in the sense of feeling a common cause with someone else who has been sidelined from power; even if the overlap of his views with yours is imperfect. He has also been almost alone in raising housing as a political issue that needs to be addressed; certainly the only major figure in politics to do so consistently, rather than swaying with the media winds.

Ive met him. Hes none of the above.

Hes useless. Really useless.

He cant handle people having a different opinion. Hes lazy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/05/2017 at 9:06 AM, spyguy said:

He's lazy.

Being half-serious here, but I don't think this is a problem. There is a necessary role for governments in regulation, but that's not a full-time job, and usually leaves far too much time for corruption and regulatory capture. Most of the time, strong ledership is more of a burden on the country than a blessing. Random collection of case studies:

  1. My favourite president of the United States: Calvin Coolidge, who did a resoundingly OK job, while sleeping between 15 and 18 hours a day. His most admirable achievement is that he didn't launch a war during his time in office.
  2. I believe (without any particular evidence) that the Netherlands is one of the best-run polities in the world. Part of the reason for that is that the parliament was set up in a back-water, near a hedge, where they couldn't get up to too much mischief.
  3. Belgium is less of a shining example overall, but it has provided the instructive example that a country doesn't fall to pieces when there is no government for a protracted period. Alphonse Allaise once wrote a funeral march consisting of 24 bars of silence, which is widely regarded as his best composition. I think a similar case could be made for the 2010-2011 parliament in Brussels' Palace of the Nation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Toast said:

Being half-serious here, but I don't think this is a problem. There is a necessary role for governments in regulation, but that's not a full-time job, and usually leaves far too much time for corruption and regulatory capture. Most of the time, strong ledership is more of a burden on the country than a blessing. Random collection of case studies:

  1. My favourite president of the United States: Calvin Coolidge, who did a resoundingly OK job, while sleeping between 15 and 18 hours a day. His most admirable achievement is that he didn't launch a war during his time in office.
  2. I believe (without any particular evidence) that the Netherlands is one of the best-run polities in the world. Part of the reason for that is that the parliament was set up in a back-water, near a hedge, where they couldn't get up to too much mischief.
  3. Belgium is less of a shining example overall, but it has provided the instructive example that a country doesn't fall to pieces when there is no government for a protracted period. Alphonse Allaise once wrote a funeral march consisting of 24 bars of silence, which is widely regarded as his best composition. I think a similar case could be made for the 2010-2011 parliament in Brussels' Palace of the Nation.

No, hes really lazy.

Hes got form.

Full whip for a vote which he doesnt turn up for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, spyguy said:

Oh, Belgium is falling to pieces.

Its splitting between Brussells (migrants), wallonia and flemish.

Yes, I know that - that's why they had no government for a year. However everything carried on working just as it had before.

I think I'm simply saying that I'm (mostly) a supporter of small government, so lazy politicians don't bother me. The main exception in recent history is the failure to regulate financial institutions properly. Even there, if Gordon Brown had just left the original statues on the books, rather than meddling, we would be in a better place overall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Toast said:

Yes, I know that - that's why they had no government for a year. However everything carried on working just as it had before.

I think I'm simply saying that I'm (mostly) a supporter of small government, so lazy politicians don't bother me. The main exception in recent history is the failure to regulate financial institutions properly. Even there, if Gordon Brown had just left the original statues on the books, rather than meddling, we would be in a better place overall.

They empty the bins, stuff like that. But stuff like stopping the country dalling to buts, new laws, redhction in state spending, etc .. Nah. They just creep along a downward trajectory, gettung worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't voted since the 1997 election that put new labour in charge......then I thought, 'oh shoot'.....spoilt my ballot paper ever since.  But not this time.

With the crass confusion in tory ranks decimating them on a daily basis, I am beginning to believe a Labour landslide on the scale of 1945 is on the cards. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/may/27/fallon-left-red-faced-after-condemning-boris-johnson-extremism-comments

This isn't old labour, it's certainly not new labour, it's more like revitalised labour..._

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   62 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.