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Bruce Banner

8 out of 10 motorists incapable of thinking for themselves.

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https://www.smmt.co.uk/2017/04/eight-in-10-car-owners-choose-peace-of-mind-over-45-mot-money-saving/

Have we really got to the stage where we can't maintain our cars without State intervention.

Currently, all cars in the UK must undergo an MOT test when they reach three years old, and then annually thereafter, but government is proposing to delay the date of the first test for 12 months to when the car is four years old. It argues this would save motorists £100 million a year, or £45 over the vehicle’s lifetime.1 However, 83% of car owners showed resistance to the idea, saying that £45 – the typical MOT test fee2 – is worth the peace of mind that their car is safe, roadworthy and legal.

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It's just a make work money maker for garages and the fee on top of the annual service just seems to be an outright tax raising scam,  

I'm not saying there isn't a safety aspect to the enforced annual MoT because roads are becoming more and more congested and more congested at an increasingly rapid rate. 

The new rule seems to encourage new car ownership so helps to keep that garage maintenance money maker pipeline open.

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My point was that "83% of car owners showed resistance to the idea, saying that £45 – the typical MOT test fee – is worth the peace of mind that their car is safe, roadworthy and legal". Can't they get their car checked without compulsion? It might even be cheaper, but no, if nanny doesn't force them to do what they think is necessary they won't do it :rolleyes:.

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Wait for the electric cars.....how will they replace loss in fuel duty/tax?.....soon all be paying road tolls/ road rent to private companies to use the road networks?.....very lucrative for some.....be renting everything soon.;)

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Is it not more likely, that since the introduction of the MOT, that cars have got significantly more robust and reliable, and three years worth of use barely dents the lifetime of one?

Look how many 10 year+ cars are open the roads (and still looking pretty good). I remember when I was a kid, a 10 year old car was almost at the end of it's life

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1 hour ago, winkie said:

Wait for the electric cars.....how will they replace loss in fuel duty/tax?.....soon all be paying road tolls/ road rent to private companies to use the road networks?.....very lucrative for some.....be renting everything soon.;)

Just a wild stab; tax the electricity used for charging electric cars?

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18 minutes ago, Mirror Mirror said:

Just a wild stab; tax the electricity used for charging electric cars?

What will stop anyone recharging from home?

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Against this. A car could do 100000 miles in that time with tyres and brakes worn past the limit.

They're treated as appliances already. This should not be encouraged 

" £45 over the vehicle’s lifetime."

:rolleyes: pathetic 

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6 hours ago, Bruce Banner said:

My point was that "83% of car owners showed resistance to the idea, saying that £45 – the typical MOT test fee – is worth the peace of mind that their car is safe, roadworthy and legal". Can't they get their car checked without compulsion? It might even be cheaper, but no, if nanny doesn't force them to do what they think is necessary they won't do it :rolleyes:.

I think that what is actually going through their minds (but perhaps they weren't asked explicitly) that that they're worried about all the other cars driving around unsafe.

3 hours ago, southmartin said:

Is it not more likely, that since the introduction of the MOT, that cars have got significantly more robust and reliable, and three years worth of use barely dents the lifetime of one?

Look how many 10 year+ cars are open the roads (and still looking pretty good). I remember when I was a kid, a 10 year old car was almost at the end of it's life

Well, maybe there are different failure modes.  Olden day cars would be rusted through and the engines shagged at 10 years, but what about modern cars' complex electronics -- is there a risk of headlight adjusters failing (blinding oncoming drivers, all while the driver thinks their lights are fantastic), abs/airbags failing (oh, that is what that light is for), etc etc.

But you are more or less right, in that very very few cars fail the mot at 3 years, so an extra year will have negligible effect on overall car safety.

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11 hours ago, chronyx said:

Against this. A car could do 100000 miles in that time with tyres and brakes worn past the limit.

They're treated as appliances already. This should not be encouraged 

" £45 over the vehicle’s lifetime."

:rolleyes: pathetic 

money is really cheap...until you have to earn it.

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I know how cars work and do a lot of my own maintenance. I've still had cars fail the MOT on stuff like weeping shocks and failing suspension bushes, which are not particularly easy to diagnose at home in the street.

The main objection to 4 year MOTs from my perspective is that people could easily have worn their tyres out in 3 years, and a lot of people simply don't give them a thought. Now a worn Original Equipment tyre is probably no worse in the rain than the ditchfinders most people think are adequate to replace them with, but at least they'll not be worn through to the canvas and prone to blowing out on motorways etc.

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17 hours ago, southmartin said:

Is it not more likely, that since the introduction of the MOT, that cars have got significantly more robust and reliable, and three years worth of use barely dents the lifetime of one?

Look how many 10 year+ cars are open the roads (and still looking pretty good). I remember when I was a kid, a 10 year old car was almost at the end of it's life

isn't the problem that e.g. tyres may wear out in 3 years, and many motorists are too tight to pay for new ones or too lazy to check the tread? The MOT forces them to fix this, which is a good thing as they may injure others in any crashed caused by their actions.

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17 hours ago, winkie said:

What will stop anyone recharging from home?

Well, I dont know much about it, but I believe you need an extra, special circuit dor a car charger, due to the high power requirements. I dont think you can just plug it into your normal 13 amp socket, so any car charging could be metered separately.

Even if Im wrong, if a levy needs to be raised for charging electric cars, I doubt it will be too difficult to administer; maybe a £100 per annum levy per electric car registered to a certain address? Maybe this is another reason for the push to install smart meters, which will undoubtadly able to recongnise and charge accordingly electric car charging.

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2 minutes ago, Mirror Mirror said:

Well, I dont know much about it, but I believe you need an extra, special circuit dor a car charger, due to the high power requirements. I dont think you can just plug it into your normal 13 amp socket, so any car charging could be metered separately.

Even if Im wrong, if a levy needs to be raised for charging electric cars, I doubt it will be too difficult to administer; maybe a £100 per annum levy per electric car registered to a certain address? Maybe this is another reason for the push to install smart meters, which will undoubtadly able to recongnise and charge accordingly electric car charging.

Smart meters are there to monitor usage, they benefit the fuel companies and anyone else that would value that information......they can tell when you are away, approx how many occupy house, when they turn the kettle on, they save money paying for meter readers, doing away with jobs.....I will avoid getting one for as long as possible.......watching the wheel spinning and common sense tells me how much using....... don't want an electric car either.;)

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On 4/27/2017 at 6:34 PM, winkie said:

What will stop anyone recharging from home?

you've not quite grapsed how this war works yet have you?

 

it is all about contol over ENERGY...just as important as contol over food,water,fuel and shelter.

the one thing TPTB DO NOT WANT is the little people having contol over the production and distribution of all of the above.

 

the means to innovate solutions to the above,is hence,also under attack-which is why MSM gives you a staple diet of talent shows and soap opera's,rather than something which is meant to make you THINK.

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On 4/28/2017 at 0:31 PM, Mirror Mirror said:

Well, I dont know much about it, but I believe you need an extra, special circuit dor a car charger, due to the high power requirements. I dont think you can just plug it into your normal 13 amp socket, so any car charging could be metered separately.

Even if Im wrong, if a levy needs to be raised for charging electric cars, I doubt it will be too difficult to administer; maybe a £100 per annum levy per electric car registered to a certain address? Maybe this is another reason for the push to install smart meters, which will undoubtadly able to recongnise and charge accordingly electric car charging.

no more economy 7 boyo.expect increased VAT on electricity,oil and gas.......and then a pay per mile toll system enforced by in-car black box(which curiously will not limit speed excess in school 20 zones etc,because that's another revenue generator which could be solved, but wont)

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On 28/04/2017 at 0:40 PM, winkie said:

Smart meters are there to monitor usage, they benefit the fuel companies and anyone else that would value that information......they can tell when you are away, approx how many occupy house, when they turn the kettle on, they save money paying for meter readers, doing away with jobs.....I will avoid getting one for as long as possible.......watching the wheel spinning and common sense tells me how much using....... don't want an electric car either.;)

They will knock on your pretending they have an appointment? You scratch your head but you are fee anyway and let them do it

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On 4/27/2017 at 3:28 PM, Bruce Banner said:

My point was that "83% of car owners showed resistance to the idea, saying that £45 – the typical MOT test fee – is worth the peace of mind that their car is safe, roadworthy and legal". Can't they get their car checked without compulsion? It might even be cheaper, but no, if nanny doesn't force them to do what they think is necessary they won't do it :rolleyes:.

If the government didn't cap the fee at £45 you would be paying £100+ for a check like that at a main dealer.

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8 hours ago, GreenDevil said:

Most of the knackered cars are running EE plates so are exempt from MOTs anyway...

not true!...another revenue generator that will be coming into the headlines fairly shortly.

the rules specify that if you import a vehicle from another country(eu included),then you have a maximum of 6 months grace period,after that the vehicle must be either removed from uk,or registered, which also includes a mandatory VOSA inspection so relevant road safety/MOT laws are complied with

 

I was looking at importing a motorbike from france some months ago, and to complete the paperwork+inspection+register was going to be something like £300-400, might be worth it on a new one, but for anything over 5 years old it really isn't worth the hassle.

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