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btd1981

Our lovely landlord

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As chance would have it, our landlord has a very distinctive name.

Thanks to Google, it was quite easy to find his Twitter account, which contains no shortage of 'right on' tweets about various current affairs matters. Yeah, go you, with your correct take on anything and everything!!!

Yet this guy won't let us into the loft of the house we rent. Apparently we might leave things behind when we move on...

The floor tiles in the kitchen are cracked and sharp, and according to the inventory were to be replaced, but after six months that's not happened. The guy is short of money apparently...Except he has a spare house?? Doing better than we are on paper....

The tv aerial feed doesn't work. Apparently it's too much money to fit a freeview aerial, and we aren't allowed in the loft to fit our own aerial in any case...

Sorry, beer induced rant. Just seems funny that tenants do seem to attract a certain disrespect from people. Are we subhuman? I mean, we're 'only' renters, so presumably we should recalibrate our expectations for life downwards? Why does this ****, who in reality doesn't earn significantly more than me (I have a fair idea what he does, ahem) feel able to lord over the likes of me??

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20 hours ago, btd1981 said:

The floor tiles in the kitchen are cracked and sharp, and according to the inventory were to be replaced, but after six months that's not happened. The guy is short of money apparently...Except he has a spare house?? Doing better than we are on paper...

Of the top of my head if I was really bothered with the hassle. Pay for it then bill him. When he takes you to court show them the written down inventory saying he would replace them. I've no idea really, this is one when you would need to study the law / your rights, but as far as your rant I empathize with you.

Blow Fly's idea would be much less hassle mind.

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Yeah, sorry about the rant :P

I guess the point I was trying to get across so badly is that some landlords really think they are amazing people, pillars of society, yet they're more than willing in many cases to treat their tenants really unfairly.

I've got another anecdote of a friend of ours, who really is good to be around, socially and she looks out for people. But she is an 'accidental' landlord, with tenants in one of her parent's old houses, and I overheard her scheming with a friend how the tenants could be evicted so that her children could move in. It was so disheartening to hear, especially as I can empathise with how the tenants will feel, and because they have just had a baby :(

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2 minutes ago, btd1981 said:

Yeah, sorry about the rant :P

I guess the point I was trying to get across so badly is that some landlords really think they are amazing people, pillars of society, yet they're more than willing in many cases to treat their tenants really unfairly.

Technically Landlords are economic rent seekers, in nature the equivalent is a parasite. They are amazing to themselves and probably developing economies too, keeping living costs high in competing countries like the UK making for less competition in wages. Germany understands this which is why rent increases are capped with inflation.

Ironically in eCommerce people who buy domain names they think someone else will have use for are known as "domain name squatters". In housing squatters are people that use buildings that nobody else is using.

 

11 minutes ago, btd1981 said:

I've got another anecdote of a friend of ours, who really is good to be around, socially and she looks out for people. But she is an 'accidental' landlord, with tenants in one of her parent's old houses, and I overheard her scheming with a friend how the tenants could be evicted so that her children could move in. It was so disheartening to hear, especially as I can empathise with how the tenants will feel, and because they have just had a baby :(

Lucky her for inheriting a free house. I hope you're OK incase you have cognitive dissonance about your friend! Once (2011) there was no council tax on second homes, then councils got totally strapped for cash. Now they can charge up to 150% on second homes. A small but good start.

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1 hour ago, Arpeggio said:

I hope you're OK incase you have cognitive dissonance about your friend!

It's horrible, she has said things that could really make me kick off, but I've learned to just take a deep breath and realise there are more important things. My wife calls housing my 'hulk' trigger :)

The kids are being gifted 50 grand too. 'Just like that', as Tommy Cooper would say. Took us a few years of small sacrifice to put that in the bank. Nothing against them for it, but an illustration as good as any that these days the notion that merit alone will get you places is fading fast.

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In Germany if there is ANYTHING  wrong and needs fixing, the tenant is legally entitled to pay only a portion of rents.  Even for stuff like broken sharp tiles,

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14 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

Technically Landlords are economic rent seekers, in nature the equivalent is a parasite. They are amazing to themselves and probably developing economies too, keeping living costs high in competing countries like the UK making for less competition in wages. Germany understands this which is why rent increases are capped with inflation.

Ironically in eCommerce people who buy domain names they think someone else will have use for are known as "domain name squatters". In housing squatters are people that use buildings that nobody else is using.

Quote

 

rent-seeking
ECONOMICS
noun
noun: rent-seeking; noun: rentseeking
  1. 1.
    the fact or practice of manipulating public policy or economic conditions as a strategy for increasing profits.
    "cronyism and rent-seeking have become an integral part of the way our biggest companies do business"
adjective
adjective: rent-seeking
  1. 1.
    engaging in or involving the manipulation of public policy or economic conditions as a strategy for increasing profits.
    "rent-seeking lobbyists"

 

 
Renting out capital goods provides a means for those without sufficient capital to makes use of those capital goods.
 
Price controls create distortions which make the situation worse.
 
I get that economic education in this country is total trash, but now that you have been informed, please do not make spurious arguments like this in future.
 
 

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15 hours ago, btd1981 said:

Yeah, sorry about the rant :P

I guess the point I was trying to get across so badly is that some landlords really think they are amazing people, pillars of society, yet they're more than willing in many cases to treat their tenants really unfairly.

I've got another anecdote of a friend of ours, who really is good to be around, socially and she looks out for people. But she is an 'accidental' landlord, with tenants in one of her parent's old houses, and I overheard her scheming with a friend how the tenants could be evicted so that her children could move in. It was so disheartening to hear, especially as I can empathise with how the tenants will feel, and because they have just had a baby :(

I've said on this forum before that one of the reasons I despise the 'right on', Live aid, immigrant cheering, transgender loving, global warming mob is that almost without exception when I have met a REAL **** in business or personal life linked to a financial issue, they have turned out to be one of that mob.

 

Reminds me of catholic bishops overseeing a starving flock whilst they eat like kings, solid in the knowledge that they are doing 'gods work'

Edited by wherebee

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9 hours ago, Locke said:
I get that economic education in this country is total trash, but now that you have been informed, please do not make spurious arguments like this in future.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/rentseeking.asp

"Rent-seeking is the use of the resources of a company, an organization or an individual to obtain economic gain from others without reciprocating any benefits to society through wealth creation."

The references you gave me were examples of rent seeking.

 

9 hours ago, Locke said:
Renting out capital goods provides a means for those without sufficient capital to makes use of those capital goods.

Not in business. Often that's about cost efficiency and risk. If it is cost efficient for a business to rent something despite being able to afford to buy then it will. An example would be webhosts renting their server hardware due to the fact that technology progresses fast and goes out of date relatively quickly. The risk is instead taken on by the server complex which is rented out by various webhosting companies and businesses.

A builder may find it much more cost efficient to buy and own most of the tools but for jobs that are rare and require expensive equipment, renting or outsourcing might make more sense.

It seems to me you are thinking in the context of people who can't afford to buy a house? if so you needn't talk in general terms with words like "capitol goods" as though it's a thing in business when it isn't.

Edited by Arpeggio

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22 hours ago, btd1981 said:

It's horrible, she has said things that could really make me kick off, but I've learned to just take a deep breath and realise there are more important things. My wife calls housing my 'hulk' trigger :)

The kids are being gifted 50 grand too. 'Just like that', as Tommy Cooper would say. Took us a few years of small sacrifice to put that in the bank. Nothing against them for it, but an illustration as good as any that these days the notion that merit alone will get you places is fading fast.

In my area the average semi-detached would cost £67,500 at a 1995 + inflation price. That's a good 50 grand you've got, money you've earned. Personally I'd not buy a house in the UK.

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11 hours ago, Gribble said:

In Germany if there is ANYTHING  wrong and needs fixing, the tenant is legally entitled to pay only a portion of rents.  Even for stuff like broken sharp tiles,

Been there a few times. Great place, the economic powerhouse of Europe.

Until recently they had 2 years national service choice between the military and healthcare, old people are looked after (better), they have their priorities right. Health system is insurance / non profit based.

Old people / soon to be old people in the UK seem to want to die with lots of housing equity while lying in their own s*** in a half-assed but expensive care home. I can't see how HPI can help with a heart attack or blood clot, not being able to wipe your own bum.

All good for the banks.

Edited by Arpeggio

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On 11/04/2017 at 0:02 AM, btd1981 said:

The tv aerial feed doesn't work. Apparently it's too much money to fit a freeview aerial, and we aren't allowed in the loft to fit our own aerial in any case...

I've very much experienced this, 60% of places I've rented have had an aerial socket with a crap signal. All hail torrents and catchup!

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14 hours ago, SE10 said:

I've very much experienced this, 60% of places I've rented have had an aerial socket with a crap signal. All hail torrents and catchup!

Same!

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16 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/rentseeking.asp

"Rent-seeking is the use of the resources of a company, an organization or an individual to obtain economic gain from others without reciprocating any benefits to society through wealth creation."

The references you gave me were examples of rent seeking.

 

Well, our definitions are somewhat at odds

Quote

 

Not in business. Often that's about cost efficiency and risk. If it is cost efficient for a business to rent something despite being able to afford to buy then it will. An example would be webhosts renting their server hardware due to the fact that technology progresses fast and goes out of date relatively quickly. The risk is instead taken on by the server complex which is rented out by various webhosting companies and businesses.

A builder may find it much more cost efficient to buy and own most of the tools but for jobs that are rare and require expensive equipment, renting or outsourcing might make more sense.

It seems to me you are thinking in the context of people who can't afford to buy a house? if so you needn't talk in general terms with words like "capitol goods" as though it's a thing in business when it isn't.

 

 

Taking on the risk of obsolescence/cost of repairs/the entire thing going up in flames is wealth creation, which means that simply having capital goods (which houses fall into) to rent out is not rent-seeking behaviour.

I will agree that parasites like Fungus Wilson who have grown fat at the government teat are quintessential rent seekers, but that is not because they are landlords.

 

Houses are no different than lathes, trucks, wells, or factory buildings. The value they provide is security and shelter from the elements, both of which can be priced.

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17 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

Been there a few times. Great place, the economic powerhouse of Europe.

Until recently they had 2 years national service choice between the military and healthcare, old people are looked after (better), they have their priorities right. Health system is insurance / non profit based.

Old people / soon to be old people in the UK seem to want to die with lots of housing equity while lying in their own s*** in a half-assed but expensive care home. I can't see how HPI can help with a heart attack or blood clot, not being able to wipe your own bum.

All good for the banks.

Concur with you astute incisive comments

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6 hours ago, Gribble said:

Concur with you astute incisive comments

Last bit was a bit mean, but it's the priorities of the society we are in. Germany is good though.

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8 hours ago, Locke said:

Taking on the risk of obsolescence/cost of repairs/the entire thing going up in flames is wealth creation, which means that simply having capital goods (which houses fall into) to rent out is not rent-seeking behaviour.

If you are a Landlord you might be better off thanking your good fortune to have inherited / been born at the right time and leaving this thread.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/capitalgoods.asp

"Capital goods are tangible assets such as buildings, machinery, equipment, vehicles and tools that an organization uses to produce goods or services in order to produce consumer goods and goods for other businesses."

A domestic house does not produce anything and is not a capital good.

 

8 hours ago, Locke said:

Houses are no different than lathes, trucks, wells, or factory buildings. The value they provide is security and shelter from the elements, both of which can be priced.

The only link between lathes etc. and houses you have given here is that they both provide something. Economically speaking houses are capital sinks. The only other "link" is that housing is paid for with the wealth created from production, which really proves them more different to each other.

Page 28, Capital Sink Investing.  https://www.tullettprebon.com/Documents/strategyinsights/TPSI_ArmaggaddonUSA_USL_spw_008.pdf

"Fourth, and worst of all from an economic perspective, houses are capital sinks, which absorb investment without generating a return."

The cost of building is negligible compared to the price of land. It's really more to do with land, or domestic land, which doesn't change my point.
Edited by Arpeggio

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You could fill a warehouse with of vintage wine, spirits, Ferraris, and line the walls with original Monets and not affect the value of Jacob's Creek, Famous Grouse, Ford Fiestas and Athena posters.

If you board houses in a similar way, you do affect the price of other houses.

Edited by Diver Dan
Clarity

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On 11/04/2017 at 11:19 PM, btd1981 said:

It's horrible, she has said things that could really make me kick off, but I've learned to just take a deep breath and realise there are more important things. My wife calls housing my 'hulk' trigger :)

The kids are being gifted 50 grand too. 'Just like that', as Tommy Cooper would say. Took us a few years of small sacrifice to put that in the bank. Nothing against them for it, but an illustration as good as any that these days the notion that merit alone will get you places is fading fast.

If the kids are getting £50K and a free house they could give them £45K and £5k to the tenants to get them leave before the end of their contract.  Just an idea.

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On 12/04/2017 at 0:55 PM, Locke said:
 
I get that economic education in this country is total trash, but now that you have been informed, please do not make spurious arguments like this in future.
 
 

:lol:

Hopefully you'll heed your own 'advice'.

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On 4/13/2017 at 10:52 PM, Arpeggio said:

If you are a Landlord you might be better off thanking your good fortune to have inherited / been born at the right time and leaving this thread.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/capitalgoods.asp

"Capital goods are tangible assets such as buildings, machinery, equipment, vehicles and tools that an organization uses to produce goods or services in order to produce consumer goods and goods for other businesses."

A domestic house does not produce anything and is not a capital good.

Long term renter.

Housing = shelter

A fence around a cattle paddock isn't "producing" anything, but is still adding value. 

If you used a lathe to take steel ingots and grind them down to filings, you'd be doing "work", but not producing (in fact consuming) wealth.

 

On 4/13/2017 at 10:52 PM, Arpeggio said:

The only link between lathes etc. and houses you have given here is that they both provide something. Economically speaking houses are capital sinks. The only other "link" is that housing is paid for with the wealth created from production, which really proves them more different to each other.

Page 28, Capital Sink Investing.  https://www.tullettprebon.com/Documents/strategyinsights/TPSI_ArmaggaddonUSA_USL_spw_008.pdf

"Fourth, and worst of all from an economic perspective, houses are capital sinks, which absorb investment without generating a return."

The cost of building is negligible compared to the price of land. It's really more to do with land, or domestic land, which doesn't change my point.

I don't really know what your point is here? Space is a resource just like oil, lumber or human labour. 

 

If you don't think that housing generates value, then it must be a mystery to you why people rent them as opposed to sleeping in a field and I don't know that we can have any meaningful discussion.

I've already explained rent seeking and that this is exactly what today's let-to-buy cretins are doing, and that the simple act of renting out goods (including shelter) is not rent seeking.

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28 minutes ago, Locke said:

If you don't think that housing generates value, then it must be a mystery to you why people rent them as opposed to sleeping in a field and I don't know that we can have any meaningful discussion.

I've already explained rent seeking and that this is exactly what today's let-to-buy cretins are doing, and that the simple act of renting out goods (including shelter) is not rent seeking.

You are not actually allowed to buy or rent a field and sleep in it.

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32 minutes ago, Locke said:

A fence around a cattle paddock isn't "producing" anything, but is still adding value.

A fence around livestock is integral to the production from the livestock by keeping it in the desired place. It is therefore a capital good.

 

35 minutes ago, Locke said:

If you used a lathe to take steel ingots and grind them down to filings, you'd be doing "work", but not producing (in fact consuming) wealth.

Thank you for telling me that using a lathe to grind steel ingots down into fillings is not producing anything of value / wealth. I had no idea that this is what people do with lathes. I was under the impression that a lathe would be bought / used with the intention of producing useful things with it, such a legs for tables and crankshafts.

 

42 minutes ago, Locke said:

I don't really know what your point is here? Space is a resource just like oil, lumber or human labour. 

If you don't think that housing generates value, then it must be a mystery to you why people rent them as opposed to sleeping in a field and I don't know that we can have any meaningful discussion.

I've already covered this in a previous post where I said: "The only link between lathes etc. and houses you have given here is that they both provide something." Housing / land does not generate value, it already has it.

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17 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

I've already covered this in a previous post where I said: "The only link between lathes etc. and houses you have given here is that they both provide something." Housing / land does not generate value, it already has it.

Why does a studio flat in central London attract a higher rent than a 5 bed house in some Scottish backwater?

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