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fru-gal

Quantum computers...coming to an Argos near you very soon?

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I've had this idea for riderless bicycles, and self-sh1tting toilets!:o

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My first computer was a Pentium 90mhz. It cost around £1500.

I have no doubt in 10 years we will have things that fit in our pocket, that contain all of the internet, and can solve all of the Bitcoin in puzzle in one second.

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33 minutes ago, MrPin said:

I've had this idea for riderless bicycles, and self-sh1tting toilets!:o

I think you've been beaten to it.

 

viz used to have an advert for a bicycle powered toilet that pedals all of that hard-to-shift bum clag away.

I think that one was upside down,so one you could use on the move would be useful.

maybe a fold-up bickerton type thing for the commuters to take on the train with them?

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I agree, although I still think we are quite far away for the average user to require quantum power even via the cloud. 

Uni's / Big data specialists will be the first the end user will start to notice the difference, then gaming will take it on

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How much is the extended guarantee...?

 

XYY

                                                                                                               

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

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15 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

How much is the extended guarantee...?

 

XYY

 

                                                                                                               

 

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

 

Its quantum. It expires as soon as you use it. Bit like Dixons.

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13 hours ago, oracle said:

I think you've been beaten to it.

 

viz used to have an advert for a bicycle powered toilet that pedals all of that hard-to-shift bum clag away.

I think that one was upside down,so one you could use on the move would be useful.

maybe a fold-up bickerton type thing for the commuters to take on the train with them?

Ah Mr Oracle, I have been previously published in that learned jounal.:huh: But then I have a bit of a Viz sense of humour.

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I think it's bad news for security (again, initially anyway, until a new method is invented).

 

I read something along the lines of even the most encrypted data can be cracked by a quantum computer pretty much instantly.

 

So off the top of my head that's secure messaging and online banking stuffed.

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39 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Wouldn't it end up distributed across both unless you check it off on the way in?

Yeah, possibly -- but then you wouldn't know its velocity, making getting hold of it difficult again.  Slippery things, these quantum computers.

 

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19 minutes ago, callaght said:

Yes!

There is a theory (name of which I can't remember right now) that for some things there is a universal law that says 'they're difficult' -- prime factoring is often used as an example.  So, if technology comes along which purports to solve the problem, then something else will (has to) come along to thwart the efforts.  For quantum computing, the big problem seems to be maintaining entanglement / stopping decoherence (same thing), the difficulty of which appears (at present) to scale with qbits as prime factoring scales with bits.  Now, the QC proponents seem to think that the decoherence problem is solvable -- however, this theory-of-universal-difficulty says that it won't/can't be.

But AI might be possible (although without needing QC elements)...  seeing as 'intelligence' has sort of been done at least once in the universe.  The AI might not look like the 'intelligence' we're used to, though.  (or, at least, the AI might need to spend lots of unnecessary effort so that it looks as though it is intelligence as we know it -- perhaps the point at which it realises it doesn't have to bother is the when the problems start...)

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45 minutes ago, dgul said:

There is a theory (name of which I can't remember right now) that for some things there is a universal law that says 'they're difficult' -- prime factoring is often used as an example.  So, if technology comes along which purports to solve the problem, then something else will (has to) come along to thwart the efforts.  For quantum computing, the big problem seems to be maintaining entanglement / stopping decoherence (same thing), the difficulty of which appears (at present) to scale with qbits as prime factoring scales with bits.  Now, the QC proponents seem to think that the decoherence problem is solvable -- however, this theory-of-universal-difficulty says that it won't/can't be.

But AI might be possible (although without needing QC elements)...  seeing as 'intelligence' has sort of been done at least once in the universe.  The AI might not look like the 'intelligence' we're used to, though.  (or, at least, the AI might need to spend lots of unnecessary effort so that it looks as though it is intelligence as we know it -- perhaps the point at which it realises it doesn't have to bother is the when the problems start...)

Nail on head.  It LOOKS like its intelligent...A discussion recently witha curious relative had been looking at the proponent vids of AI, and yes, we are heading towards singularity...just look at the "intelligence" on a smart phone....in the form of predictive text....thus, there is a very normal confusion between what is "clever" and what is intelligent when assigned to a piece of kit....they even market this "cleverness" by calling them "smart" phones.  Smart they aint.  clever, they are, but the cleverness comes from the programs and very high speed of processing the guesses.

Apparently, the learning aspect is now assigned the term "AI" too.  so that makes Faceslime intelligent in that it can count hits its users make and send them an advert that might be relevent.  

For me, the missing part in the AI equation is a motive...what will drive an AI to do anything at all...hollywood tells us it is self interest which leads to our destruction..every frickin time....its a good story, but its the same as trying to work out ET's motive...you can discuss this till the end of time as ET, and AI, dont yet exist.

Religion has a similar aspect too.

 

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19 minutes ago, Bloo Loo said:

Nail on head.  It LOOKS like its intelligent...A discussion recently witha curious relative had been looking at the proponent vids of AI, and yes, we are heading towards singularity...just look at the "intelligence" on a smart phone....in the form of predictive text....thus, there is a very normal confusion between what is "clever" and what is intelligent when assigned to a piece of kit....they even market this "cleverness" by calling them "smart" phones.  Smart they aint.  clever, they are, but the cleverness comes from the programs and very high speed of processing the guesses.

Apparently, the learning aspect is now assigned the term "AI" too.  so that makes Faceslime intelligent in that it can count hits its users make and send them an advert that might be relevent.  

For me, the missing part in the AI equation is a motive...what will drive an AI to do anything at all...hollywood tells us it is self interest which leads to our destruction..every frickin time....its a good story, but its the same as trying to work out ET's motive...you can discuss this till the end of time as ET, and AI, dont yet exist.

Religion has a similar aspect too.

 

Wittgenstein: "If a lion could speak, we could not understand him." How could you even recognise an alien intelligence?

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22 minutes ago, Bloo Loo said:

For me, the missing part in the AI equation is a motive...what will drive an AI to do anything at all...hollywood tells us it is self interest which leads to our destruction..every frickin time....its a good story, but its the same as trying to work out ET's motive...you can discuss this till the end of time as ET, and AI, dont yet exist.

A gripe I've had about some science fiction - "The AI is completely logical and will seek to destroy us." Nothing particularly logical in that, and with logic alone it's got no motivation to actually do anything, even preserve itself. So if you build one and don't hardwire in some motives it may just sit there doing nothing. Stick some uncertainty in it and who knows what it may do.

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4 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Wittgenstein: "If a lion could speak, we could not understand him." How could you even recognise an alien intelligence?

By what it does. Another science fiction gripe is making aliens too alien for the sake of that (although it's not as prevalent as aliens being exaggerated single human aspects with lumpy foreheads). Consider their background, the environment they'd evolved in and what was necessary to survive. There would have to be some similarities, and once you've got those you've got a lever for understanding. If it's something created by another intelligence though all bets may be off.

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2 hours ago, callaght said:

I think it's bad news for security (again, initially anyway, until a new method is invented).

 

I read something along the lines of even the most encrypted data can be cracked by a quantum computer pretty much instantly.

 

So off the top of my head that's secure messaging and online banking stuffed.

I started a thread about precisely this

Discussing quantum computing with a friend.

Let us suppose that a quantum computer is built (what I'm reading online is that they're getting closer - one article even mentioned it could be as close as 10 years away).

The internet at the moment facilitates global commerce, from banking and trading to buying junk off ebay and everything in between.

It is also used as the go to communication medium (overtaking paper post) and can transmit and accept electronic contracts etc etc

This is all predicated on two things

i) secure encryption (let's not get bogged down whether it currently is or the NSA or whoever can have a nosey)

ii) easy access to the technology required

I'm asking the question that if quantum computing happens will it destroy these two aspects that have made the web so ubiquitous in our lives

My understanding of quantum computing is that it can crack any currently used encryption method (virtually instantly) and can also create unbreakable encryption of it's own

I predict that quantum computers will only be available (at least initially) to:

i) governments

ii) big business/corporations

iii) major crime organisations

in that order

Will this not render the internet useless for the rest of us (other than an entertainment platform) if we can no longer trust the safety and privacy of transactions and communications?

Game changer I think. It would be the equivalent of going backwards 25 years

What think you?

Or am I talking cobblers?

I know there's some smart bods on this forum, try and be a little gentle with me

edit to add:

and I don't think cloud based distributed quantum computing is possible - and even if it is there will be a delay developing it

Edited July 3, 2016 by knock out johnny

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2 hours ago, callaght said:

I think it's bad news for security (again, initially anyway, until a new method is invented).

 

I read something along the lines of even the most encrypted data can be cracked by a quantum computer pretty much instantly.

 

So off the top of my head that's secure messaging and online banking stuffed.

Well they could always use quantum encryption methods.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_key_distribution

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