Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
gibbon

3D printed house for $10k and in 24hrs

Recommended Posts

 

Interesting as it was built on site. Shame we don't live in a world which would let this technology have an effect on house prices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, gibbon said:

 

Interesting as it was built on site. Shame we don't live in a world which would let this technology have an effect on house prices.

I don't think the cost of physically building houses is the problem in the UK.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, stormymonday_2011 said:

I don't think the cost of physically building houses is the problem in the UK.....

Yup it's the availability of credit that is the problem.

Give it a decade or two with the advances in technology you'll probably be able to print a house for less than a cost of a night out on the sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

7 minutes ago, gibbon said:

Yup it's the availability of credit that is the problem.

Give it a decade or two with the advances in technology you'll probably be able to print a house for less than a cost of a night out on the sauce.

Yes and land. Otherwise its just good news for land banking rent seekers if they can cut costs.

A house near me is at an asking price of 70k after a serious fire with no roof (just burnt rafters sticking out) and is uninhabitable.

Edited by Arpeggio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apart from land another problem is infrastructure. What does it cost to connect these houses to services e.g. sewage, electricity? 

However, I think councils should explore this kind of thing as a niche, short-term solution to housing people who would otherwise be made homeless by landlords ending their tenancies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Patient London FTB said:

Apart from land another problem is infrastructure. What does it cost to connect these houses to services e.g. sewage, electricity? 

It's an argument that NIMBYs often use that the local roads/sewers/schools/electricity/air supply won't be able to cope. They must be charities because companies that make money from customers like supermarkets don't protest that their customer base will increase and they will have to expand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, gibbon said:

Interesting as it was built on site. Shame we don't live in a world which would let this technology have an effect on house prices.

That's a very impressive video.  It may not have an immediate effect in our land price bubble but probably quite major impact in a long term.  

If I knew I could build a house I like for £10k-£20k and quickly, then even if the land was £100k (ten times over-priced), it would not be such a major obstacle.

Edited by Bear Hug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Arpeggio said:

 

Yes and land. Otherwise its just good news for land banking rent seekers if they can cut costs.

A house near me is at an asking price of 70k after a serious fire with no roof (just burnt rafters sticking out) and is uninhabitable.

Stick a link up to it, I want to check it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

I don't think the cost of physically building houses is the problem in the UK.....

True, it's not the limiting step, but it is definitely archaic and labour intensive.  I watched a robot arm in a factory on Thursday, and I couldn't believe the speed at which it moved things and flipped things with it's suckered fingers. Round houses, like attractive oast houses, would make a lot of sense because a central robot could build almost all of it from the inside, like in the video. 

I've also thought about foundations a few times. They seem expensive, and use large quantities of concrete for the pad. I can't see why a house couldn't just float, or a very stiff base ring could be constructed which would allow attitude correction if the house did tilt as it settled?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Arpeggio said:

 

Yes and land. Otherwise its just good news for land banking rent seekers if they can cut costs.

Unfortunately, I agree.  Land price will probably just increase by the exact amount of saving on the building price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bear Hug said:

That's a very impressive video.  It may not have an immediate effect in our land price bubble but probably quite major impact in a long term.  

If I knew I could build a house I like for £10k-£20k and quickly, then even if the land was £100k (ten times over-priced), it would not be such a major obstacle.

This thread is probably an ideal place to push a link to a very good new report about land and housebuilding. 

TL;DR summary: When we rely on private, speculative developers we get sh*t overpriced houses because they have to pay the maximum for land. Here's a different model where we can build better housing by paying less for land. 

Actual summary

Full report

Edited by Patient London FTB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Patient London FTB said:

This thread is probably an ideal place to push a link to a very good new report about land and housebuilding. 

Actual summary

What was the point being made in the Shelter report about second-hand houses being £40k cheaper than new, on average? Isn't that how it ought to be as a product with a finite lifetime ages? If the (guessing) average house now is 60 years old, and the average new build construction costs £80k, then that makes the half-life of a house about 100 years?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ChewingGrass said:

Stick a link up to it, I want to check it out.

Sure. I can't find the listing it was a few months back, must have been snapped up with a cheeky offer / changed mind.

However, I'm 99% sure it was this one. The pic on the right gives it away for me, the same roof on the pic where I saw it for sale at 70k.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14631653.House_blaze_spreads_to_neighbouring_properties_as_seven_fire_engines_tackle_flames/#

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bear Hug said:

Unfortunately, I agree.  Land price will probably just increase by the exact amount of saving on the building price.

Despite technology getting more powerful and within less and less space, as humans the need for physical space is where we are getting ripped off by those who produce nothing. This makes me think of the film "Transcendence" with Johny Depp, in which a man uploads himself into a computer. I think I know what I will upload myself into.

Joking aside.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Bear Hug said:

Unfortunately, I agree.  Land price will probably just increase by the exact amount of saving on the building price.

That is the point I was trying to make.

It is demand, the availability of land and the supply of credit that fixes the price of housing in the UK.  Building costs are a relatively minor factor. Builders already throw up properties at the lowest possible cost. It makes little difference to prices because they control supply to keep demand and priced up. Given  enough people and credit allied with a limited supply of land then you can have sky high house prices even if the cost of construction is zero.

Edited by stormymonday_2011

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, gibbon said:

Interesting as it was built on site. Shame we don't live in a world which would let this technology have an effect on house prices.

Something I find interesting in this is that the time-to-build is cited as important (24 hours!).  But once you get a machine building without any human input, then time-to-build becomes less important.  

Say you wanted this house -- does it matter if it was built in 24 hours vs start it March 1st, ready for detailing March 31st?  Okay, you need more machines, but you could use smaller machines (less slurry in pipes, lower mass to support, lighter scale machine), slower setting slurry (possibly better for the environment or less prone to settling cracks).

Anyway, we're clearly only just on the start of this 3D printing of houses malarkey.  For a start, they should be printing components in the house (ducting for services, but maybe stairs, or even work-surfaces in the kitchen).  

But, from the point of view of this forum, it is all pointless -- prices are set by the availability and demand of credit, and it would only impact on the relative costs of each component of build (which equals the cost of the land).  It'll have a big impact on builders wages, though (well, wages would quite possibly go up as it'll be a more technical role, but there'll be fewer jobs)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dgul said:

Something I find interesting in this is that the time-to-build is cited as important (24 hours!).  But once you get a machine building without any human input, then time-to-build becomes less important.  

Say you wanted this house -- does it matter if it was built in 24 hours vs start it March 1st, ready for detailing March 31st?  Okay, you need more machines, but you could use smaller machines (less slurry in pipes, lower mass to support, lighter scale machine), slower setting slurry (possibly better for the environment or less prone to settling cracks).

Anyway, we're clearly only just on the start of this 3D printing of houses malarkey.  For a start, they should be printing components in the house (ducting for services, but maybe stairs, or even work-surfaces in the kitchen).  

But, from the point of view of this forum, it is all pointless -- prices are set by the availability and demand of credit, and it would only impact on the relative costs of each component of build (which equals the cost of the land).  It'll have a big impact on builders wages, though (well, wages would quite possibly go up as it'll be a more technical role, but there'll be fewer jobs)

Depends whether the tech can be used as a lever between the end user of housing / purchaser and the monopoly of land banking builders that currently land lock  direct access to land via their ability to purchase and hold on their books pretty much all the available large scale housebuilding land.

Lenders won't lend to individuals generally for a house that does not exist, so you cannot get the finance individually or as a group to compete for what building land is available, unless it is backed by huge amounts of equity elsewhere. Used to be the case that 1/3 cost of land, 1/3 build cost (direct costs), 1/3 retained profit. Building materials verbally are going up all the time so building cost is most definitely not trending towards zero and is still a factor. First gen 3d building will be structure only and the 24hour build claim and then showing the final build all fitted out is misrepresenting the current tech.

However if a 3d build robot could do the shell and first fit that would be a massive cost saving overall - the Chinese buy bare shell off plan and keep it that way a lot - at that point you have a viable identifiable house, just missing the finishing.

Now back to the finance side, if say 20/50/100 people wished to buy into a development, they could bid on a parcel of land and have in place build agreements for 3D housing to go ahead to completion in terms of main structure, with guaranteed pricing and delivery. It could be the key to unlock financing that is very difficult to do so now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, onlyme2 said:

Depends whether the tech can be used as a lever between the end user of housing / purchaser and the monopoly of land banking builders that currently land lock  direct access to land via their ability to purchase and hold on their books pretty much all the available large scale housebuilding land.

Lenders won't lend to individuals generally for a house that does not exist, so you cannot get the finance individually or as a group to compete for what building land is available, unless it is backed by huge amounts of equity elsewhere. Used to be the case that 1/3 cost of land, 1/3 build cost (direct costs), 1/3 retained profit. Building materials verbally are going up all the time so building cost is most definitely not trending towards zero and is still a factor. First gen 3d building will be structure only and the 24hour build claim and then showing the final build all fitted out is misrepresenting the current tech.

However if a 3d build robot could do the shell and first fit that would be a massive cost saving overall - the Chinese buy bare shell off plan and keep it that way a lot - at that point you have a viable identifiable house, just missing the finishing.

Now back to the finance side, if say 20/50/100 people wished to buy into a development, they could bid on a parcel of land and have in place build agreements for 3D housing to go ahead to completion in terms of main structure, with guaranteed pricing and delivery. It could be the key to unlock financing that is very difficult to do so now.

Well, yes, but if automated 3D printing of houses became cheap and easy, then the reluctance of lenders to lend against a house not yet built is reduced (as it only costs £10k and 7 days to get to a shell, say) and the cost of land (with planning) goes up.  So you sort of end up back where you started -- it costs lots of get a house and there's little you can do about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/03/2017 at 11:47 AM, stormymonday_2011 said:

I don't think the cost of physically building houses is the problem in the UK.....

True but actually, recently, the cost of building has shot up. I don't know if it is builders chancing their arm but it seems pretty consistent. Our neighbours recently had quotes for a simple rear single storey 6m extension. In the region of £60-£70k excluding any interior work or glass or doors. Read that again, just for the simple structure to be built. For something I think should cost about £10k in the modern world.

http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/over-two-thirds-of-builders-report-materials-price-rise/7018284.article#

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, sPinwheel said:

Why should this be any cheaper than pre-fab. Or any better?

Much more simplified materials handling - materials to factory, concrete moulds, setting time, storage, transportation to site, site storage, erection (requiring labour, crane (well europeans use them we don't tend to - all on telehandlers) - plus all the manufacture done in expensive factory with workforce. Whereas concrete print - one machine on site, feed it concrete into hopper in bulk - very efficient plus some other materials during the print, no premises, very few workers. If  designs contain all the details for first fit - channels and orifices for cabling and plumbing install time would be drastically reduced too so less labour to perform those tasks. Better - there would be advantages and disadvantages and compromises, but building unique looking houses and flexibility would be a big gain over prefab. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still better off in a motor home or camper. No planning permission, over-priced land or printing equipment needed. 

When the neighbours or people around start to to become annoying, you can move faster than a laser printer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   92 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.