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One-percent

An ideal hobby

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18 hours ago, One-percent said:

It's a lot of beer but they did start in 1991 so 16 years. 

About 8 pints a day for 16 years. That can't be right.

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It says 1984 so 33 years at 27 pints a week.  Assuming three day weekends that's nine pints a day.

Well I couldn't drink that but I've known many people who could.

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29 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It says 1984 so 33 years at 27 pints a week.  Assuming three day weekends that's nine pints a day.

Well I couldn't drink that but I've known many people who could.

Southern Wimp!:o

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49 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It says 1984 so 33 years at 27 pints a week.  Assuming three day weekends that's nine pints a day.

Well I couldn't drink that but I've known many people who could.

Knew many serial drinkers when I worked on the shop floor (engineering) in the 1980s, 3 pints would be had in the works bar at the back of the canteen at lunch followed by another 4 or 5 at the social club in the evening. so that would be 35 pints monday to friday plus weekends (whatever that was). Draught beer at the time would typically be at 3.2/3.4% abv unless you drank the strong stuff at 4.2% which not many did as it was more expensive.

So it was spread out over the week and more or less continuous but significantly less strong than todays beers.

None of these blokes was a burden to the NHS or the pension system, they quite regularly dropped dead from heart attacks in their 50s due to lack of exercise and excessive carbohydrate consumption as no one went to the doctor unless you were actually that ill you couldn't get to work, by which time it was generlly too late.

Johhny Jones was the exception, trichloroethane was his downfall, not a good idea washing your hands in your own personal 200 litre drum whilst smoking a fag before riding your Honda C90 home every evening. Unusually cancer got him before he had chance put on enough weight to have a heart attack.

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6 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

It says 1984 so 33 years at 27 pints a week.  Assuming three day weekends that's nine pints a day.

Well I couldn't drink that but I've known many people who could.

Yes it does sound like a nice hobby. Cracking bunch. And all for charity eh.

Wonder if they raised enough money to pay the NHS for their liver transplants?

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25 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Yes it does sound like a nice hobby. Cracking bunch. And all for charity eh.

Wonder if they raised enough money to pay the NHS for their liver transplants?

It seems that they are still doing the pub crawl so probably not called on the services of the nhs yet

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1 hour ago, Sledgehead said:

Yes it does sound like a nice hobby. Cracking bunch. And all for charity eh.

Wonder if they raised enough money to pay the NHS for their liver transplants?

Rowlocks to the charity aspect. People get to live their dreams and justify it as being "for charity".

Met an Aussie last year, walking around the British coast "for charity".

Read about a 60yo woman today, rowing around the British coast "for charity".

Absolute effing cack.

These people do it because they want to do it. It's a personal challenge and a life enhancing experience.

Now that is absolutely great. Perfectly good reason to do it.

Just have the self confidence not to wrap it in a cloak of charity.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Rowlocks to the charity aspect. People get to live their dreams and justify it as being "for charity".

Met an Aussie last year, walking around the British coast "for charity".

Read about a 60yo woman today, rowing around the British coast "for charity".

Absolute effing cack.

These people do it because they want to do it. It's a personal challenge and a life enhancing experience.

Now that is absolutely great. Perfectly good reason to do it.

Just have the self confidence not to wrap it in a cloak of charity.

The cynicism runs deep there Frank. :ph34r:

i must say, by and large I agree. 

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8 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Rowlocks to the charity aspect. People get to live their dreams and justify it as being "for charity".

Met an Aussie last year, walking around the British coast "for charity".

Read about a 60yo woman today, rowing around the British coast "for charity".

Absolute effing cack.

These people do it because they want to do it. It's a personal challenge and a life enhancing experience.

Now that is absolutely great. Perfectly good reason to do it.

Just have the self confidence not to wrap it in a cloak of charity.

Yes the charity aspect pisses me off. My personal ambition is to take a long long long trip exploring the Scottish coast and islands. I find it nauseating getting in the papers/internet to make appeals for charity. If you want to do something and can, IMO, just do it!

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2 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Yes the charity aspect pisses me off. My personal ambition is to take a long long long trip exploring the Scottish coast and islands. I find it nauseating getting in the papers/internet to make appeals for charity. If you want to do something and can, IMO, just do it!

Totally agree EE. Just quietly go ahead and do what you want.  Why on earth would you want to put it in the papers other than !look at me'

Ive just won an award, not saying anything more about it here, but a mate was really pushing me to get it in the local paper.  I can't think of anything I would less rather do.  

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5 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Yes the charity aspect pisses me off. My personal ambition is to take a long long long trip exploring the Scottish coast and islands. I find it nauseating getting in the papers/internet to make appeals for charity. If you want to do something and can, IMO, just do it!

 

14 minutes ago, One-percent said:

The cynicism runs deep there Frank. :ph34r:

i must say, by and large I agree. 

Exactly. There are many things that I wish to do for the pure sake of doing them. It seems so false to pretend that I don't really want to do them at all but am.only doing them because of a purported charity aspect.

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Exactly. There are many things that I wish to do for the pure sake of doing them. It seems so false to pretend that I don't really want to do them at all but am.only doing them because of a purported charity aspect.

Slightly off topic but everywhere I go these days there is someone rattling a tin or bucket. I always say politely 'no thank you'. The number of times I get a dirty look and on occasion harassment for not contributing beggars belief.  The worst was from two burly guys (I'm female)  collecting for some rescue helecopter thing, might have been air ambulance, at my local Tesco.  

Bloody chuggers and 'charity'   

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12 minutes ago, One-percent said:

Slightly off topic but everywhere I go these days there is someone rattling a tin or bucket. I always say politely 'no thank you'. The number of times I get a dirty look and on occasion harassment for not contributing beggars belief.  The worst was from two burly guys (I'm female)  collecting for some rescue helecopter thing, might have been air ambulance, at my local Tesco.  

Bloody chuggers and 'charity'   

I'm one of the aforesaid "burly guys" and as a consequence I desperately try to make it not seem aggressive / hostile / rude when I say "no".  People with whom I work often think I'm a bit soft because of my over-compensating for looking like a wrestler.

Always happy to put a few quid in a tin but no signing up for anything.

I have a particular weakness for cat charities.

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13 minutes ago, One-percent said:

Slightly off topic but everywhere I go these days there is someone rattling a tin or bucket. I always say politely 'no thank you'. The number of times I get a dirty look and on occasion harassment for not contributing beggars belief.  The worst was from two burly guys (I'm female)  collecting for some rescue helecopter thing, might have been air ambulance, at my local Tesco.  

Bloody chuggers and 'charity'   

Just ask them...Do you know what your CEO earns?...usually they don't. Then I say to them....well you should find out what they earn then you might understand why I'm going to give you nothing but I sympathise with your plight!

 

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm one of the aforesaid "burly guys" and as a consequence I desperately try to make it not seem aggressive / hostile / rude when I say "no".  People with whom I work often think I'm a bit soft because of my over-compensating for looking like a wrestler.

Always happy to put a few quid in a tin but no signing up for anything.

I have a particular weakness for cat charities.

Aw, that's good of you.  My neighbour back home, family was big in the rnli and I heard a few stories about how things were arranged. There was so much money sloshing around they would give kit away to mates. Not just life jackets but engines and boats.  Ive also taught people working for the third sector so have seen  the waste firsthand. I don't give anymore.  

3 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Just ask them...Do you know what your CEO earns?...usually they don't. Then I say to them....well you should find out what they earn then you might understand why I'm going to give you nothing but I sympathise with your plight!

 

See above EE. It's a business now. Long gone  are the days when it was people giving their time for free. 

What grates is the aggression when I respond with a polite no thanks.  I don't get into debate about the morality of it all, it's up to them what they do.  I just don't want to engage and don't welcome the animosity when I choose not to   

I guess it doesn't help living in London. 

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Getting back to the original post I'm sure when their quest started charity was different back then! Good on them, they seem to have had a good time.

I agree with other posters that a lot of charity has now just became a business and many of them I refuse to give to.

Living in a rural town there's not a lot of harassment from "chuggers" but it is more prevalent in surrounding larger towns/small cities. Bigger cities must be horrendous for being hounded!

But even in my small town I've noticed that a charity started to "give hungry people a meal" is being abused by people that are most definetly not hungry. Most of the patrons are quite large people! But hey, the do gooder woman gets a lot of local press, not sure if she rips a wage from it but I know at least one person is earning from it!

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1 minute ago, Economic Exile said:

 But hey, the do gooder woman gets a lot of local press, not sure if she rips a wage from it but I know at least one person is earning from it!

This^

im convinced it is about virtue signalling and trying to make money from it at the same time. 

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3 minutes ago, One-percent said:

This^

im convinced it is about virtue signalling and trying to make money from it at the same time. 

Agreed!

As an aside the married do gooder woman I mentioned is screwing someone on the side. Her husband is a really nice bloke and very well to do. She snapped him up when he was widowed with young children and they have a child together now. Maybe that's why she does it....meeting people? But I still wonder if she's getting cash from her enterprise. If she is, she does not need it!

Charity. Bah, humbug. My charity is given directly to people I know when I can.

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