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Richard Dyson embarrasses himself

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1 minute ago, Sajid the Taxmeister said:

When it goes terribly wrong who (other than moaning to husbands) will they complain to?

I think they're all divorced?

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Stocks and shares = no council tax obligations, no boilers or maintenance costs, no costs from laws of minimum standards to adhere to (smoke alarms etc.), no administration, no advertising costs to find tenants, can sell at the click of a button and don't have to find a buyer, tax free if ISA.

BTL = all the above applied, many of which for good reason.

Also the comments below the article make for a good read.

Edited by Arpeggio

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I love my stocks and shares, as I recently said on here my 750,000 sylvania platinum shares (purchased at an average of 7.33p) are doing very nicely, and now I've placed stops the minimum annual income *when moved over into boring dividend payers the increase in value alone will provide   ~£168 a month FOR LIFE. 

I've done really well out of another miner (hoc), 3 trades from £1,000 to the last sell of £8,000 (this week). That's another £30 a month. 

Ladies you can keep your illiquid BTL.

*I can trade in/out of shares in little under 0.1 seconds for little cost. Try doing that with bricks and mortar.

As recent events suggest they'll be tapping their ex husbands for more maintenance in the not too distant future. So if these men are reading here by chance, you know what to do. Spend, hide and divest.

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Well he's off to a cracking start:

Quote

You might overhear men in the pub talking about shares or markets, but not women.

Quote

They all investing for the long term, but their chosen vehicle is buy-to-let. Long-standing friends from school

Amateurs, doing it for their pension, old school friends - I don't see what could possibly go wrong here.

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1 hour ago, spyguy said:

Their chosen vehicle is leverage, not housing.

And other people imo.

1 bed at £130,000 or whatever.*

BTLers and HPIers have long made their own choices.  "Ace having own home, let's own lots of other would-be owners homes."

About time more people accepted there is something very risk/damaging obvious in the process for laying claim to more and more homes in .   I see they can lay blame for other pet causes where individuals are of an anti-society way, just not HPIers and BTLers - 'da banks' 'media' for moar and moar homes.  10 properties the plan. 

 

 

Telegraph article is only a preview for me.  

*Yahoo seem to have the full article.  "The ownership of something physical appeals."

https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/stock-markets-boys-well-invest-070000070.html

Quote

 

'The ship told you a guilty system recognises no innocents. I'd say it does. It recognises the innocence
of a young woman, for example, and you saw how they treated her. In a sense it even recognises the
sanctity of the body… but only to violate it. Once again, Gurgeh, it all boils down to ownership,
possession; about taking and having.'

-Sci Fi book

 

 

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3 hours ago, Venger said:

And other people imo.

1 bed at £130,000 or whatever.*

BTLers and HPIers have long made their own choices.  "Ace having own home, let's own lots of other would-be owners homes."

About time more people accepted there is something very risk/damaging obvious in the process for laying claim to more and more homes in .   I see they can lay blame for other pet causes where individuals are of an anti-society way, just not HPIers and BTLers - 'da banks' 'media' for moar and moar homes.  10 properties the plan. 

 

 

Telegraph article is only a preview for me.  

*Yahoo seem to have the full article.  "The ownership of something physical appeals."

https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/stock-markets-boys-well-invest-070000070.html

 

 

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"Others say women are simply more risk-averse than men and less comfortable with the thought of a potential capital loss – even if it is only on paper."

 

so there you have it.

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1 hour ago, Si1 said:

"Others say women are simply more risk-averse than men and less comfortable with the thought of a potential capital loss – even if it is only on paper."

 

so there you have it.

Yes ..buying stocks with yield with cash, Or 400% leverage with a 20% deposit on a btl.

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10 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Yes ..buying stocks with yield with cash, Or 400% leverage with a 20% deposit on a btl.

The implicit "you can't lose with property" meme.

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As an example of how underrated the stock market is just look how one of the most unadventurous "safe" stock market investments has fared over the past 5 years. And it gives a dividend yield of 2.45%. You can sell all or part of it for a cost of £10 at any time. You don't get tenants ringing at 3 am with a plumbing incident... just sit back and collect the divis. The performance of equities since the great financial crisis has been fantastic.

 As a nation we believe Investment = property and that the stock market is some sort of rigged casino. The women in the article should probably have just set up SIPPs. They would get all this plus a tax rebate!

5yearFRCL.png

Edited by InlikeFlynn

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9 minutes ago, voldemort said:

The stock market *is* a rigged casino, for the same reason houses are: money printing by governments.

Yep, but the Arabs and Chinese probably have the most money in stocks and while ppt (plunge protection team) can contain some of it, if the big boys cash in they'll lose control.

This was the big worry with brexit but never materialised and why so much money as gone into chf and bunds even with negative returns.

It seems there is too much money swilling around at the moment, it's just in the wrong hands.

You see if they just paid the prolls more they could carry on increasing debt.

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Quote

The three women raised the original money by extending the mortgages on their homes, so there is a further cost to factor in.

Just needs a tip from a shoeshine boy, and the circle is complete.

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23 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

Stocks and shares = no council tax obligations, no boilers or maintenance costs, no costs from laws of minimum standards to adhere to (smoke alarms etc.), no administration, no advertising costs to find tenants, can sell at the click of a button and don't have to find a buyer, tax free if ISA.

BTL = all the above applied, many of which for good reason.

Also the comments below the article make for a good read.

Yep that is why I wouldn't countenance BTL, just too much hassle with breakdowns, bad tenamts and delapidations.

Very difficult to compare BTL with Cash with the stock market over the last 10 years because so many variables at play (such as bad tenants) with BTL. I use 10 years as a base, as that is when i joined this site and was either out of property or downsized from my position of 10 years ago.

But I can have a stab at owner occupation v cash v stock market( using the weak performance of the FTSE 100, so a bit unfair on equity although it does constitute 80% of UK Market Cap). For most of the country the best thing you could do was buy a house as cheap as possible and be in cash or Equity for those 10 years.

Derbyshire House prices 2007-2017......................+11% altogether, 1% pa.(zoopla my current address)

FTSE 100 (deductiong 1%pa. for dealing costs and holding charges but accumulating dividends) 2007,+6.4%; 2008,-29.3%; 2009,+26.3%, 2010,+11.6%; 2011, -3.2%; 2012, +9.0%; 2013, +17.7%; 2014, -0.3%; 2015, -2.3%; 2016, +18.1%...total accumulation +51%

Cash (fixed rate bonds with early maturity option (best) net of tax)  2007; 5.0%; 2008, 5.0%; 2009; 4.0%, 2010, 3.0%; 2011, 3.0%; 2012, 3.0%; 2013, 3.0%; 2014, 3.0%; 2015, 2.0%; 2016, 1.5%....total accumulation +37%

(also a bit unfair on cash because unexpired long term fixes would make the true return greater)

But the stock market slightly shading it courtesy of 2016 stellar performance.

Edited by crashmonitor

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13 hours ago, crashmonitor said:

Yep that is why I wouldn't countenance BTL, just too much hassle with breakdowns, bad tenamts and delapidations.

Very difficult to compare BTL with Cash with the stock market over the last 10 years because so many variables at play (such as bad tenants) with BTL. I use 10 years as a base, as that is when i joined this site and was either out of property or downsized from my position of 10 years ago.

But I can have a stab at owner occupation v cash v stock market( using the weak performance of the FTSE 100, so a bit unfair on equity although it does constitute 80% of UK Market Cap). For most of the country the best thing you could do was buy a house as cheap as possible and be in cash or Equity for those 10 years.

Derbyshire House prices 2007-2017......................+11% altogether, 1% pa.(zoopla my current address)

FTSE 100 (deductiong 1%pa. for dealing costs and holding charges but accumulating dividends) 2007,+6.4%; 2008,-29.3%; 2009,+26.3%, 2010,+11.6%; 2011, -3.2%; 2012, +9.0%; 2013, +17.7%; 2014, -0.3%; 2015, -2.3%; 2016, +18.1%...total accumulation +51%

Cash (fixed rate bonds with early maturity option (best) net of tax)  2007; 5.0%; 2008, 5.0%; 2009; 4.0%, 2010, 3.0%; 2011, 3.0%; 2012, 3.0%; 2013, 3.0%; 2014, 3.0%; 2015, 2.0%; 2016, 1.5%....total accumulation +37%

(also a bit unfair on cash because unexpired long term fixes would make the true return greater)

But the stock market slightly shading it courtesy of 2016 stellar performance.

Very good on the investments. In terms of making the house into money if you only own one house and need it to live in then you don't benefit unless you are downsizing during an HPI or upsizing during HPC I think.

Edited by Arpeggio

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12 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

Very good on the investments. In terms of making the house into money if you only own one house and need it to live in then you don't benefit unless you are downsizing during an HPI or upsizing during HPC I think.

Absolutely. My main message was, despite what you might think, the worst thing you could have done in most of the country is buy the most expensive house you can afford and assume that will have done the job for you as far as your balance sheet is concerned over the last decade. In fact in the north of the country, at least, that strategy would have been a disaster. In fact to buy the cheapest house you can live with, thus avoiding rent,  was the winning option because cash and Equity have won easily.

Obviously there are exceptions....Cambridge, London, where leveraged house purchase has been the preferred option and created millionaires. Totally useless to the country as far as a balanced economy and investment is concerned.

Edited by crashmonitor

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