Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Economic Exile

Has anyone done a Masters while holding a job?

Recommended Posts

As per title.

The reason I ask is that my daughter is currently undertaking a masters and will be finished the end of august. She currently works 16 to 20 hours in Starbucks.

She has been approached to do a job for 3 days a week monitoring pests on fruit farms with a car, phone and laptop provided. This is highly relevant to her degree and masters.

There's nothing final yet re job but I feel that she's making excuses about lack of time doing both masters and this job. She's seen a career advisor who has advised her to take the job due to the difficulties graduates have in getting work in their field. I've said the same to my daughter because as we know on this forum that is how things are.

While I know it would be tough for six months for daughter should she be formally offered the job my feeling is that it's doable and that she should grab it if she gets the chance.

Am I being unrealistic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15-20 hours at Strabucks ins not a lot or strenuous. I did ~10 h washing pots during my Masters. Paid the rent and gave me 'zonk' time.

You need a break from stiudying .Washing pots did it for me and paid my rent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, spyguy said:

15-20 hours at Strabucks ins not a lot or strenuous. I did ~10 h washing pots during my Masters. Paid the rent and gave me 'zonk' time.

You need a break from stiudying .Washing pots did it for me and paid my rent.

Yes I agree. I realise what she's doing at starbucks requires little brainpower and she does have breaks from studying. But I'm just concerned that come the end of august she may not be able to get anything in her field.

I done a degree when I was in my early 40's...single parent of 2 under tens, worked 24 hours per week with young homeless and had all the usual daily living stuff to do myself. It was tough but doable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a masters at thirty.  Not only could I not combine my studies with a job, so left it in advance, but I extended my masters from two years from the one year I started at as I was only doing the bare minimum at one year and the degree was not the goal.

I suppose it depends why you are doing it; mine was interest and I wasn't going to get any financial gain from doing it.  Quite the reverse!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did both a masters and doctorate whilst working.  I wouldn't suggest it is easy and probably impossible if the course is full time. However she is young and so should have lots of energy.  It will be hard but doable 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I did a masters at thirty.  Not only could I not combine my studies with a job, so left it in advance, but I extended my masters from two years from the one year I started at as I was only doing the bare minimum at one year and the degree was not the goal.

I suppose it depends why you are doing it; mine was interest and I wasn't going to get any financial gain from doing it.  Quite the reverse!

I admit I wouldn't like to be in her shoes if she is offered the job. In an ideal world I'd say to her to just wait until she's finished in august. But we don't live in an ideal world!

When I was doing my degree I wished I didn't have to work but I had no choice so just got on with it.

Its a difficult dilemma for daughter. Thanks for your contribution to the thread about your experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, One-percent said:

I did both a masters and doctorate whilst working.  I wouldn't suggest it is easy and probably impossible if the course is full time. However she is young and so should have lots of energy.  It will be hard but doable 

She's not in uni everyday although the company are aware that she has three weeks when she is on field work everyday.

Thanks for your contribution. I think it's doable and particularly because she is young but I don't want to be tough with her. She will have to decide and live with how things end up panning out for her. I'm just scared that if she turns it down it might take ages for her to get her foot in the door after august.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Economic Exile said:

She's not in uni everyday although the company are aware that she has three weeks when she is on field work everyday.

Thanks for your contribution. I think it's doable and particularly because she is young but I don't want to be tough with her. She will have to decide and live with how things end up panning out for her. I'm just scared that if she turns it down it might take ages for her to get her foot in the door after august.

 

If she finishes in the summer, so what if she is burning the candle at both ends?  It will not be for long and there is a distinct end in sight.

fwiw, I have similar discussions with my two offspring, not about the balance between education and work, but generally about taking extra on to flesh out the cv.  They are not interested and a large part of me can understand. It's not as if they will ever be able to buy a home, so I just leave it and think, oh well, as long as they are happy and earning. 

I wouldn't worry too much, at least she is showing initiative and studying and working. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, One-percent said:

If she finishes in the summer, so what if she is burning the candle at both ends?  It will not be for long and there is a distinct end in sight.

fwiw, I have similar discussions with my two offspring, not about the balance between education and work, but generally about taking extra on to flesh out the cv.  They are not interested and a large part of me can understand. It's not as if they will ever be able to buy a home, so I just leave it and think, oh well, as long as they are happy and earning. 

I wouldn't worry too much, at least she is showing initiative and studying and working. 

Yes, maybe I'm worrying too much!

She's always been very conscientious and given me no grief at all when she was growing up.

Im thankful for the responses to help me stay balanced about it. At the end of the day it's her life and she has to make the choices and live with any consequences.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Economic Exile said:

 

She's always been very conscientious and given me no grief at all when she was growing up.

 

That's all you can ask (hope?) for.  She sounds lovely and a credit to you.  She will find her own way imho, just support her to do what is right for her. It's not easy and I remember an old saying from when I was that age: "you can't put old heads on young shoulders ". I didn't get it then but I do now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, One-percent said:

That's all you can ask (hope?) for.  She sounds lovely and a credit to you.  She will find her own way imho, just support her to do what is right for her. It's not easy and I remember an old saying from when I was that age: "you can't put old heads on young shoulders ". I didn't get it then but I do now. 

Yes, you're right about the old head on young shoulders! I was a complete idiot when I was her age which I've told her about. She is doing 100% better than I was at her age! She really is lovely with a circle of old friends from home and new ones in Edinburgh and does lots of interesting and productive things. I'm very proud of her and we get on really well ?

I went to visit her yesterday at Edinburgh and I've just felt wound up because she was even thinking about turning this job down if she's offered it.

Like you say it's her life and I just need to continue to support her in whatever she decides is right for her and not interfere and spoil our relationship regardless of what happens. 

I'm feeling better about seeing her aunt tomorrow now and will be able to shoot her down when she starts ranting. She is very bossy and dictator like! (Because I was a single parent and had family support it's gone to her head)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Yes, you're right about the old head on young shoulders! I was a complete idiot when I was her age which I've told her about. She is doing 100% better than I was at her age! She really is lovely with a circle of old friends from home and new ones in Edinburgh and does lots of interesting and productive things. I'm very proud of her and we get on really well ?

I went to visit her yesterday at Edinburgh and I've just felt wound up because she was even thinking about turning this job down if she's offered it.

Like you say it's her life and I just need to continue to support her in whatever she decides is right for her and not interfere and spoil our relationship regardless of what happens. 

I'm feeling better about seeing her aunt tomorrow now and will be able to shoot her down when she starts ranting. She is very bossy and dictator like! (Because I was a single parent and had family support it's gone to her head)

There you go, she sounds an absolute credit.  It's hard but don't let the bullies get under you skin.  Smile sweetly and say of course... the just remove the conversation from you mind :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, One-percent said:

There you go, she sounds an absolute credit.  It's hard but don't let the bullies get under you skin.  Smile sweetly and say of course... the just remove the conversation from you mind :)

Yes thank you. I'm glad I started the thread. HPC collective wisdom is helping me to chill about it ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a post graduate diploma (which could have been converted into a MSc if I continued and did the disseration) which was full time albeit distance learning on top of my normal day job which included 3 hours of commuting. It wasn't pleasant and my wife had to do a lot more around the house etc. I wouldn't recommend a full time PGDip on top of a full time job. It was hell and really sucked the life out of me. A part time job and an MSc does sound more doable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Done several post grad courses while holding down a full-time job in my 30s and 40s.  It will be hard, but perfectly doable. The ideal would be to see if she can use her work in any essays/projects she has to do. Plenty of people study via open university, nightschool etc while holding down jobs. 

Personally, I think she'd be mad to turn down a job in her chosen field if she can manage it. In my 20s, I'd have probably done both, and partied hard as  well.  Sadly, don't have the energy nowadays. 

Ultimately, it is her life though - and it depends on the relationship you have with her as to how far to push it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, StainlessSteelCat said:

Done several post grad courses while holding down a full-time job in my 30s and 40s.  It will be hard, but perfectly doable. The ideal would be to see if she can use her work in any essays/projects she has to do. Plenty of people study via open university, nightschool etc while holding down jobs. 

Personally, I think she'd be mad to turn down a job in her chosen field if she can manage it. In my 20s, I'd have probably done both, and partied hard as  well.  Sadly, don't have the energy nowadays. 

Ultimately, it is her life though - and it depends on the relationship you have with her as to how far to push it. 

In response to ARCP and SSC.

I don't know yet but there is a possibility that her final dissertation can be incorporated with the job. My hunch is that for her this is the clincher. I'll probably know more by the end of the week.

If she can fit her final project with the job I would be inclined to push her!

But yes I think it's doable anyway with a part time at her age even if she can't fit uni work in but I'm not going to fall out with her over it. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a master's in chemistry for one exact year October to October.  By the time I graduated there weren't too many graduate training scheme jobs around and I had to wait till the next June to get a 'proper' graduate job.

 

I say she should go for it.  The job market is surely more competitive now then it was for me in 1998.

 

Re people doing masters while working, I know a few people who have done (imho soft) master's degrees while working, but no one who has done a master's in a proper scientific (i.e. hard) master's while working.  I recon it will be tough, but should be worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, reddog said:

I did a master's in chemistry for one exact year October to October.  By the time I graduated there weren't too many graduate training scheme jobs around and I had to wait till the next June to get a 'proper' graduate job.

 

I say she should go for it.  The job market is surely more competitive now then it was for me in 1998.

 

Re people doing masters while working, I know a few people who have done (imho soft) master's degrees while working, but no one who has done a master's in a proper scientific (i.e. hard) master's while working.  I recon it will be tough, but should be worth it.

I can't give the proper title of the masters she is doing but it's biology and ecology (scientific). It's also funded because there are perceived shortages of people with the appropriate skills. Hopefully that will be in daughters favour?

My feeling is that she should go for it because it is a 3 day a week job if it's offered but as has been mentioned I have an old head and hers is young!

Im wound up because of the job market and over abundance of people doing degrees. However she does say that most of the people on her course are foreign and plan to go back to their own country when they've finished. But that's another debate!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If she can manage it I would recommend she gets some work experience in her industry prior to graduation.

I didn't I basically pissed around in my summer vacations doing fun jobs that help build my character but weren't in engineering. When I graduated I really struggled to get a job the reason being lack of relevant work experience. Once I got my first job I was ok. But things are a lot tougher now than my day so if she can get a relevant job and it not effect her studies I'd say she should go for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, StainlessSteelCat said:

Done several post grad courses while holding down a full-time job in my 30s and 40s.  It will be hard, but perfectly doable. The ideal would be to see if she can use her work in any essays/projects she has to do. Plenty of people study via open university, nightschool etc while holding down jobs. 

Personally, I think she'd be mad to turn down a job in her chosen field if she can manage it. In my 20s, I'd have probably done both, and partied hard as  well.  Sadly, don't have the energy nowadays. 

Ultimately, it is her life though - and it depends on the relationship you have with her as to how far to push it. 

Out of interest SS, courses done for personal interest or work related (or both?)? Any paid for by work?

I am interested in this as I worry employers may begin to expect this sort of continual personal investment in education. £40k first to get a job and possibly 2-3 masters throughout life (£15k/each) to maintain it. All for professional jobs which in years gone by required 1 degree or none. It would be taking the situation we have now with non-graduate jobs becoming graduate jobs and then adding 1-3 masters degrees ontop!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

I can't give the proper title of the masters she is doing but it's biology and ecology (scientific). It's also funded because there are perceived shortages of people with the appropriate skills. Hopefully that will be in daughters favour?

My feeling is that she should go for it because it is a 3 day a week job if it's offered but as has been mentioned I have an old head and hers is young!

Im wound up because of the job market and over abundance of people doing degrees. However she does say that most of the people on her course are foreign and plan to go back to their own country when they've finished. But that's another debate!

It sounds as if she will be ok when she completes.  Shortage area.  Fees being paid.  

I know how you feel though. My daughter did English and so decided that she had to have a job that actually utilised her degree.  Yeah I know.

left uni in the June, by November I was getting pretty frustrated with her.  She would not take a get by job or sign on.  However, bless her, she got a couple of internships, unpaid, and on the back of that got a job in publishing. 

I guess the moral of my tale is that they will only do what they want and with a bit of support will,get there. 

Not sure if this helps at al...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

I can't give the proper title of the masters she is doing but it's biology and ecology (scientific). It's also funded because there are perceived shortages of people with the appropriate skills. Hopefully that will be in daughters favour?

My feeling is that she should go for it because it is a 3 day a week job if it's offered but as has been mentioned I have an old head and hers is young!

Im wound up because of the job market and over abundance of people doing degrees. However she does say that most of the people on her course are foreign and plan to go back to their own country when they've finished. But that's another debate!

Don't want to wind you up further.  But in my opinion there isn't the STEM job bonanza that the government and media think there is.  Even in my day, 20 years ago it was said there was a shortage of scientists, but when I started looking for a job in chemistry,  there really wasn't that much in the pay bracket / potential future pay bracket that I was hoping for (must admit my views might be clouded by the fact I was going off the subject a bit).

 

In the end I transferred to IT which was going through a real boom at the time.

 

Out of my chemistry friends, a few have gone on to make a real success of themselves in academic circles, 2 are real stars in industry (both moved to the US).  But out of the ones still in chemistry, even now at least half are going from one unstable post doc type position to another unstable post doc type position all dependent on short term funding.  Bit of a sad state of affairs for someone who has put so much into their education.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, One-percent said:

It sounds as if she will be ok when she completes.  Shortage area.  Fees being paid.  

I know how you feel though. My daughter did English and so decided that she had to have a job that actually utilised her degree.  Yeah I know.

left uni in the June, by November I was getting pretty frustrated with her.  She would not take a get by job or sign on.  However, bless her, she got a couple of internships, unpaid, and on the back of that got a job in publishing. 

I guess the moral of my tale is that they will only do what they want and with a bit of support will,get there. 

Not sure if this helps at al...

Yes it does help! Daughter fobbed off a transfer to a Tesco job in Edinburgh when she first went off to Edinburgh....because it wasn't what she wanted to do...?

Kids, eh. Youre right, they will only do what they want. I'm willing to support her because overall as I mentioned she has really tried and caused me no grief.

If she's offered the job and for whatever reason turns it down, hopefully because the masters is funded...shortages....well, it may be her saving grace!

Sincerely, thanks for your comments...they've helped me calm down ?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, assetrichcashpoor said:

If she can manage it I would recommend she gets some work experience in her industry prior to graduation.

I didn't I basically pissed around in my summer vacations doing fun jobs that help build my character but weren't in engineering. When I graduated I really struggled to get a job the reason being lack of relevant work experience. Once I got my first job I was ok. But things are a lot tougher now than my day so if she can get a relevant job and it not effect her studies I'd say she should go for it.

To her credit she has voluntarily helped a PhD student with their research and has undertaken relative weekend courses.

I agree with you. She should take the job if it's offered because IMO it's doable. However as 1% says...they'll only do what they want to do. If she turns it down and things are tough when she wants a relative job...well that'll be a hard lesson in life for her!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   100 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.