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steve99

The Plantation economy

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http://www.oftwominds.com/blogfeb17/plantation-servitude2-17.html   
 

Im sure this will be moved to another section of HPC but to get the message across it may be worth leaving here for a while.  This scenario very much applies to the UK as it is becoming today.    

Extract:

February 10, 2017
The only possible output of low social capital is rising inequality.
One of the themes I've been addressing since 2008 is the neocolonial-plantation structure of the U.S. economy. The old models of colonial exploitation that optimized plantations worked by cheap imported labor (or situated in peripheral nations with plenty of cheap labor) have, beneath the surface, been adapted to advanced capitalist democracies.

The adaptations have been so successful that not only do we not even recognize the Plantation structure--we love our servitude within it.
As noted yesterday, the current mode of production optimizes the commoditization of everything: computer chips, fish and chips, labor, expertise, everything.
This commoditization optimizes the Plantation Model of integrated production, global supply chains and distribution to global marketplaces, a hierarchical management focused on maximizing profits to send back to the owners, a ruthless focus on lowering costs via labor arbitrage (commoditize the work so it can be performed anywhere labor is cheaper/more desperate) and a fanatical desire to eliminate competition or fix prices via cartels to ensure high profits.
Global capital has optimized the Plantation Model in the form of global corporations. Wal-Mart is the quintessential example. Like a classic agricultural plantation, Wal-Mart enters a region with a diverse, employment-rich ecology of small businesses and supply chains of local and regional manufacturers and distributors, and it bulldozes the entire "forest" of businesses, suppliers and distributors with the irresistible blade of integrated global supply chains and "lower prices, always."
Wal-Mart replaces the localized economy with a low-pay, highly efficient plantation economy in which the townpeople's only choice is to work for Wal-Mart or scrape out a living feeding the Wal-Mart workers, doing their laundry, etc.--exactly as on a classic plantation.

 

The original article is much longer..
 

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1 hour ago, workhou said:

This system used to offer stability but what does it offer now, zero hr contracts and instability. 

Which came about on account of the management group think (ie copycat learned behaviour) that states that

A: Every year we will be more profitable by x% and

B: Every year we will cut costs by x%

C: Roping enough management supporters to make it happen via the 'whatever it takes' and the incentivised  bonus culture.

Edited by steve99

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2 hours ago, steve99 said:

Which came about on account of the management group think (ie copycat learned behaviour) that states that

A: Every year we will be more profitable by x% and

B: Every year we will cut costs by x%

C: Roping enough management supporters to make it happen via the 'whatever it takes' and the incentivised  bonus culture.

Careful now, you're beginning to sound like a socialist! 

I seem to remember that Marx predicted that capitalism would eat itself. 

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Isn't the scenario more like the culture of growth by all means corporatism?

Surely any form of capitalism worth the name would recognise this futility as the financial cancer it is.

Tl;dr ****** karl marx

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The next step is the commoditisation of brain power via Artificial intelligence- which will lead to even more income inequality and wealth concentration at the top.

But there is a law of diminishing returns here - the more we succeed in commoditising our labour to reduce it's cost the less profit the economy can create.

Labour costs are a neccessary imperfection- the grain of sand in the oyster that gives rise to the pearl of profit- no labour costs=no wages=no profits.

 

 

 

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Quote

The adaptations have been so successful that not only do we not even recognize the Plantation structure--we love our servitude within it.
As noted yesterday, the current mode of production optimizes the commoditization of everything: computer chips, fish and chips, labor, expertise, everything.
This commoditization optimizes the Plantation Model of integrated production, global supply chains and distribution to global marketplaces, a hierarchical management focused on maximizing profits to send back to the owners, a ruthless focus on lowering costs via labor arbitrage (commoditize the work so it can be performed anywhere labor is cheaper/more desperate) and a fanatical desire to eliminate competition or fix prices via cartels to ensure high profits.

TPTB have it licked - they have contrived a situation where the majority of people will protest fervently in favour of this type of plantation structure - they will protest on behalf of the 1%, and call anyone a racist who disagrees with such commoditization of human labour/ingenuity.  Globalisation is like a religion now - including freedom of movement.  If you disagree with it, you're tarred and feathered.  The slaves have been brainwashed to defend their masters.

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7 minutes ago, canbuywontbuy said:

TPTB have it licked - they have contrived a situation where the majority of people will protest fervently in favour of this type of plantation structure - they will protest on behalf of the 1%, and call anyone a racist who disagrees with such commoditization of human labour/ingenuity.  Globalisation is like a religion now - including freedom of movement.  If you disagree with it, you're tarred and feathered.  The slaves have been brainwashed to defend their masters.

CBI stooge John Cridland resuscitating Project Fear arguments about the state pension age in the Telegraph this morning.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/12/brexit-migration-cuts-could-push-state-pension-age/

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