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One-percent

It's educashun Jim, just not as we know it

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The law of unintended consequences of league table has finally been uncovered. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38929737

From the article:

One of the most highly paid head teachers in the country has been suspended amid claims of exam fixing.

Mark Keary is principal at Green Spring Academy Shoreditch in east London, and is reportedly paid £220,000 per year.

 

this is a scandal endemic in the education sector as establishments focus not on education but on their position in the league tables. We are also raising successive generations of special snowflakes who just cannot be allowed to fail.  

 

And to give it a little hpc twist, just look at the quoted salary.  Those who passed their maths gcse will be able to tell us how many classroom teachers that would pay for.

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39 minutes ago, One-percent said:

The law of unintended consequences of league table has finally been uncovered. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38929737

From the article:

One of the most highly paid head teachers in the country has been suspended amid claims of exam fixing.

Mark Keary is principal at Green Spring Academy Shoreditch in east London, and is reportedly paid £220,000 per year.

 

this is a scandal endemic in the education sector as establishments focus not on education but on their position in the league tables. We are also raising successive generations of special snowflakes who just cannot be allowed to fail.  

 

And to give it a little hpc twist, just look at the quoted salary.  Those who passed their maths gcse will be able to tell us how many classroom teachers that would pay for.

That's the most efficient way to turn a failing school into a success story. This is probably endemic across "deprived" areas of London and largely responsible for them suddenly outperforming at English GCSE those schools outside London with far higher English speaking intakes.

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Sometimes you wonder if many of the institutions that are commonly used are there for the benefit of those who work for it or the customers they are paid to be working for.;)

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18 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

That's the most efficient way to turn a failing school into a success story. This is probably endemic across "deprived" areas of London and largely responsible for them suddenly outperforming at English GCSE those schools outside London with far higher English speaking intakes.

My experience is in London and there is no probably about it. It's also not confined to the deprived areas. 

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2 minutes ago, winkie said:

Sometimes you wonder if many of the institutions that are commonly used are there for the benefit of those who work for it or the customers they are paid to be working for.;)

No the teachers hate it.  There is real pressure to ahem, massage the figures.  But the message is subtle and never explicit.  It goes along the lines of, 'well if the results are not good/better than last year, we may have to shrink the department/put it in special measures/look at capability...'. 

The message is clear but normally if it is uncovered, the management can say that they did not know that it was going on.  There will be no direct written directive so the story is that It's all down to the teachers.  I'm surprised that this super head has been made the scapegoat. He must have upset someone.  

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7 minutes ago, One-percent said:

No the teachers hate it.  There is real pressure to ahem, massage the figures.  But the message is subtle and never explicit.  It goes along the lines of, 'well if the results are not good/better than last year, we may have to shrink the department/put it in special measures/look at capability...'. 

The message is clear but normally if it is uncovered, the management can say that they did not know that it was going on.  There will be no direct written directive so the story is that It's all down to the teachers.  I'm surprised that this super head has been made the scapegoat. He must have upset someone.  

Sometimes you wonder, but you almost certainly know why people do the things that they do......a pressure/target that will almost certainly benefit them, knowing the difference between what is right and wrong......pressure to conform/perform is not always right.;)

 

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Schools have been corrupt for a long time now. When I was doing my GCSE exams in 2005/2006 most of the teachers would read the questions on the exams and then tell us what they were before we headed into the exam hall. Schooling is a joke, your grade comes down to your ability to memorize the answers that the teacher has told you to give to certain questions, there is no deductive reasoning or logic or anything that you have to do, it's just a memory game.

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The head of the local Catholic secondary school has recently been made into the "executive head" of half a dozen schools in the local area.

The school she was the head of has excellent results far, far higher than any other state school in the area, despite having significant numbers of "English not the first language at home" students. However, the school only takes students from the four feeder schools, Catholic primary schools spread over a fairly large geographic area. These schools are all wildly oversubscribed, meaning that only the parents who take seriously the jumping through hoops to qualify for a place, actually get their child in. This means that the entire intake is pre-selected for "pushy", education valuing parents. I suspect this is the root cause of the performance difference that sets this school apart from the non-selective schools, rather than any superiority in the quality of the teachers (or management).

I have to say, I'm curious as to whether her supposedly superior headteacher skills make the blindest bit of difference to these other schools. Although you have to grudgingly admire someone who can ******** their way into a salary in the region of £220,000 for running a daycare.

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Any attempt to measure something may affect results. But once there are targets and league tables, fraud becomes rife. Maybe this bloke would like to work at Volkswagen?

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There are a few a teachers in my family, I also dated a teacher a few years ago so I've heard my fair share teacher tales about the industry.  

My humble opinion is one of the major problems in the industry is it requires an immense clear-out and some decent oversight brought in. The problems are empire building and the inability to sack or demote the useless and lazy. It can literally take one bad egg in a department for it to fail.

The results are this grind just demoralises good teachers and creates this merry go round of teachers jumping from one bad school to the next bad school hoping to find the least worst. It also then creates a tier system where jobs for the better ran schools rarely come up because once your in your not going to be stupid enough to get out. 

Then after a certain period if in a job interview for a good school, if a teachers CV just reflects a merry go round of bad school hopping after first graduating it's pretty much game over for your career and your more than likely never to get into a decent school.  

However I find it hard to sympathise with teachers. They'll moan and moan about immovable bad eggs in the system but will down tools and strike the minute a Government suggests breaking that job security. 

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