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monkeyman1974

Landlady getting rinsed on mumsnet..

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Just now, monkeyman1974 said:

Guilty pleasure of mine... AIBU..

I went into the Se x forum once - by ,istake - nah deliberately.

I just had a mental image of all the fat ugly mum at the school gate humping their way round town.

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It's just an argument about a Landlord who doesn't like how their tenant's treat the property, and don't like them calling it their home.

 

The Landlady doesn't appear very professional, or understand the correct procedures to follow, which is why she's bring rinsed.

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OP
'Newbrummie Sat 28-Jan-17 14:07:48

So had a viewing at the house yesterday and the patio was covered in dog shit, as was the garden. I figured it would take a few months to sell so was happy for them to stay whilst it was on the market. Am now starting to think this is going to be impossible isn't it ?
Can I afl them to remove the dog for the rest of the tenancy ?'

Comment that kicked it off.
'NavyandWhite Sat 28-Jan-17 14:20:13

It's not their home though. They rent it and should not have left dog crap all over the garden. OP you should have stipulated no pets in the tenancy agreement. But they should have checked with you first it was ok.'

 

Flavour of the responses

'user1477282676 Sat 28-Jan-17 14:24:27

Navy Oh yes it IS their home. It's not their HOUSE but it is their home.

Glorious. OP cannot terminate, she's not within her rights to. She can give notice.

OP...if they're bankrupt and in financial difficulty be prepared for a long wait to get them out. They will need to wait until you've got them out via courts probably which can take months after the offical notice period ends.

They will have to do this to ensure they get help to be housed.'

 

 
'Gallavich Sat 28-Jan-17 14:25:27

It's not their home though. They rent it
Yes it ******ing is.

Newbrummie I fear it is you who are ******ed. You have tenants in who are bankrupt. You can serve them a section 21 notice but be prepared for them to stop paying rent and to have to take them to court to evict them. You can't possibly sell your house while this is going on.'

 

'LouBlue1507 Sat 28-Jan-17 14:30:52

Newbrummie You're attitude is ******ing disgusting! You sound extremely threatening too! They'd be better off not having a bullying landlord like you!'77

 

thecatneuterer Sat 28-Jan-17 14:35:29

If they stop paying rent they will be out damned quick and they know it

Ha ha ha. You obviously know NOTHING AT ALL about being a LL if this is what you think. The average time it takes to evict people for non payment (using a Section 8) is 6 months, but it can very easily be longer. And you are likely to get no rent at all in that time and will cost you around £800 in fees and thousands if you use a solicitor.

Eviction by any other means is a criminal matter for which you can be fined thousands and even go to jail.

EdenX Sat 28-Jan-17 14:35:42

It might not be your fault but you chose to take on certain responsibilities and risks when you become a landlord.

Gallavich Sat 28-Jan-17 14:35:59

You didn't tell them not to have a dog!
******ing amateur landlords, this is ridiculous. You should be crystal clear about your rights and obligations before you rent out a house.

LouBlue1507 Sat 28-Jan-17 14:36:40

*Newbrummie

Excuse me, I in good will let them my property and they've been sneaky. I'm not the one here that's done or doing anything wrong. I don't own a monopoly board of houses this was MY home and is my children's future. It's not my fault they've ducked theirs up.*

Yet again appealing attitude! Best off without you.

FallenSky Sat 28-Jan-17 14:36:46

You in good will let them your property? What was the good will?

Have you asked them politely to make sure there is no dog shit on the patio whilst they are accommodating your viewings?

Newbrummie Sat 28-Jan-17 14:37:37

6 months and £800 is ****** all really though tbh. And I'll get that back from the deposit. It's no biggie, calm down.
I suspect they'll just go and get on with their lives though, not everyone wants a drama over a house move.

thecatneuterer Sat 28-Jan-17 14:39:26

You can't get Section 21 fees back from a deposit as it's a 'no fault' eviction. I'm not sure about bailiff fees though, that's probably possible.

A bit of dog shit is also 'no biggie' and is very unlikely to put off serious buyers.

OurBlanche Sat 28-Jan-17 14:39:57

It is their home and the only thing they are required to do is leave it in the same condition (with fair wear and tear) as it was when they moved in. So the dog shit is a non issue until they day they move.

They don't have to allow viewings during their tenancy either!

EdenX Sat 28-Jan-17 14:40:33

You've said they won't be able to get a private tenancy, so where will they go quietly?

thecatneuterer Sat 28-Jan-17 14:40:52

Yes you could get that back if they stop paying rent, but I can't believe their deposit is at least 6 months rent plus £800?

Newbrummie Sat 28-Jan-17 14:41:55

thecatneuterer - you claim legal costs back from the guarantor who I'm sure would then be thrilled and happy to go guarantor again. I suspect as they are just normal people though they pay their rent and leave like you know most people would and do

user1477282676 Sat 28-Jan-17 14:42:02

NewBrummie you didn't do them a favour you know. They've been paying your mortgage! Or lining your pocket.

 
'thecatneuterer Sat 28-Jan-17 14:35:29

If they stop paying rent they will be out damned quick and they know it

Ha ha ha. You obviously know NOTHING AT ALL about being a LL if this is what you think. The average time it takes to evict people for non payment (using a Section 8) is 6 months, but it can very easily be longer. And you are likely to get no rent at all in that time and will cost you around £800 in fees and thousands if you use a solicitor.

Eviction by any other means is a criminal matter for which you can be fined thousands and even go to jail.'

 

 

Edited by Sancho Panza

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1 hour ago, Sancho Panza said:
Add message | Report
user1477282676 Sat 28-Jan-17 14:42:02

NewBrummie you didn't do them a favour you know. They've been paying your mortgage! Or lining your pocket.

 
'thecatneuterer Sat 28-Jan-17 14:35:29

If they stop paying rent they will be out damned quick and they know it

Ha ha ha. You obviously know NOTHING AT ALL about being a LL if this is what you think. The average time it takes to evict people for non payment (using a Section 8) is 6 months, but it can very easily be longer. And you are likely to get no rent at all in that time and will cost you around £800 in fees and thousands if you use a solicitor.

Eviction by any other means is a criminal matter for which you can be fined thousands and even go to jail.'

Not that I'm a Land Lord or intend to be, but with my business hat on I would have made sure I can pay the mortgage myself regardless of rent. Too many people think they have some kind of right to live off other people's backs and rely on others to pay their mortgage for them, then get whiny about it when it doesn't work out.

Edited by Arpeggio

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Sounds like at worst she is being inconvenienced. Cant understand when people who do air band b or rent a house out moan about stuff like this, surely that's  part and parcel of providing a service. Do they feel entitled to  money without ever being put out? 

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Awful people who are just being rude to someone from behind the safety of a pc screen - no different to little kids on Fb at school but as they are adults they are just sad pathetic scum 

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20 hours ago, Parkwell said:

Got far too caught up in that.

Seems that the Landlady in question is currently renting. Whole thing smells very amateur.

 

 

 

BTL is mosty amateur. Horrible little fat blokes and women who have moved in with their bloke and couldnt sell at 2012 without being bankrupt now thing they're making a fortune.

 

i truly despair.

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She's right about one thing, though - it's not THEIR (the tenants') home. They're simply allowed to be there for the time being...for a price.

I don't know where this attitude first appeared - "I rent, therefore it's MY "home"". Speaking as someone who both owns and rents...It's not YOURS and it's hardly a home. 

If you rented a car, you wouldn't think it was YOURS. If you rent a house, you think it's YOURS. Hell, if you REALLY think it's yours, stop paying rent - after all, it's "yours".

Some people are clueless...

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32 minutes ago, flb said:

She's right about one thing, though - it's not THEIR (the tenants') home. They're simply allowed to be there for the time being...for a price.

I don't know where this attitude first appeared - "I rent, therefore it's MY "home"". Speaking as someone who both owns and rents...It's not YOURS and it's hardly a home. 

If you rented a car, you wouldn't think it was YOURS. If you rent a house, you think it's YOURS. Hell, if you REALLY think it's yours, stop paying rent - after all, it's "yours".

Some people are clueless...

You're wrong. It is their home, as a home is a place where you live. It isn't their house, since they don't own the building.....

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1 minute ago, electrogear said:

You're wrong. It is their home, as a home is a place where you live. It isn't their house, since they don't own the building.....

I rent the flat I'm currently living in. I don't view this as my home in any way. They might call it "my" "home address", but I'm fully aware that it's not mine and therefore not my "home". I'd call it my home if I owned it. Like I said, I wouldn't call a car I rent "my car". 

In my opinion, if the landlord can decide to terminate the contract and basically kick you out, you can't call it "your" "home", but it's probably just a matter of perception. I used to rent a place some years ago. Landlady's daughter had a child and she decided she needed the house. Therefore, when the contract reached 10 months, she notified us that we should leave at the end of the contract (12 months). I can't really see how I could've called it "my home" under those circumstances.

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2 minutes ago, flb said:

I rent the flat I'm currently living in. I don't view this as my home in any way. They might call it "my" "home address", but I'm fully aware that it's not mine and therefore not my "home". I'd call it my home if I owned it. Like I said, I wouldn't call a car I rent "my car". 

In my opinion, if the landlord can decide to terminate the contract and basically kick you out, you can't call it "your" "home", but it's probably just a matter of perception. I used to rent a place some years ago. Landlady's daughter had a child and she decided she needed the house. Therefore, when the contract reached 10 months, she notified us that we should leave at the end of the contract (12 months). I can't really see how I could've called it "my home" under those circumstances.

So do you ask people "would you like to come to my landlord's for dinner"?

Would you say "I'll drop you off in Honda's car"?

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For owning I think there are really only two main things that are true, which are that the bank owns the house and the Land Lady owns her loss if that's how it goes.

Just like in the big bad real word where if you invest your own money and make a loss then that's what happens.

As opposed to a feckless world where banks create money from thin air and find tools to lend it to and make their plans come to fruition. Oh hang on, actually no. That is actually what it is.

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40 minutes ago, flb said:

I rent the flat I'm currently living in. I don't view this as my home in any way. They might call it "my" "home address", but I'm fully aware that it's not mine and therefore not my "home". I'd call it my home if I owned it. Like I said, I wouldn't call a car I rent "my car". 

In my opinion, if the landlord can decide to terminate the contract and basically kick you out, you can't call it "your" "home", but it's probably just a matter of perception. I used to rent a place some years ago. Landlady's daughter had a child and she decided she needed the house. Therefore, when the contract reached 10 months, she notified us that we should leave at the end of the contract (12 months). I can't really see how I could've called it "my home" under those circumstances.

If the only way you can understand the concept of home is in ownership terms then I feel sorry for you. You can own a house that is not a home, and you can create a home that you do not own. 

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The way I understand a home is by considering the fact that you don't get kicked out of your home (except for exceptional circumstances - war, natural disaster etc).

If another regular person (i.e not someone in power, government etc) can kick me out simply because they woke up on the wrong side of the bed, I don't see how I could possibly consider it MY home and still consider myself an intelligent being.

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Then the government better change rental laws to provide greater tenant protection jolly quick, as there are a lot of homeless people that the generally agreed upon stats aren't showing!

What a strange way of thinking about renting?!

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21 hours ago, flb said:

I rent the flat I'm currently living in. I don't view this as my home in any way. They might call it "my" "home address", but I'm fully aware that it's not mine and therefore not my "home". I'd call it my home if I owned it. Like I said, I wouldn't call a car I rent "my car". 

In my opinion, if the landlord can decide to terminate the contract and basically kick you out, you can't call it "your" "home", but it's probably just a matter of perception. I used to rent a place some years ago. Landlady's daughter had a child and she decided she needed the house. Therefore, when the contract reached 10 months, she notified us that we should leave at the end of the contract (12 months). I can't really see how I could've called it "my home" under those circumstances.

Had to make an additional comment on this! If I was renting a car for the weekend, then no, I wouldn't call it 'my car'. The same as I wouldn't call a hotel room or a holiday let 'my home'. But, if renting the vehicle on a long term lease, then yes, I would call it 'my car'. In fact, I have known people who have had lease vehicles and they all seem to consider and treat the vehicle as their own.

Just thinking further about this, I have a company van which is also leased by the company from another company. How should we refer to the van? Guess what, I call it 'my van'. Whenever, my wife, boss, people in general, talk to me about the vehicle, they all call it 'your van'. 

Edited by renting til I die

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15 minutes ago, renting til I die said:

Had to make an additional comment on this! If I was renting a car for the weekend, then no, I wouldn't call it 'my car'. The same as I wouldn't call a hotel room or a holiday let 'my home'. But, if renting the vehicle on a long term lease, then yes, I would call it 'my car'. In fact, I have known people who have had lease vehicles and they all seem to consider and treat the vehicle as their own.

Just thinking further about this, I have a company van which is also leased by the company from another company. How should we refer to the van? Guess what, I call it 'my van'. Whenever, my wife, boss, people in general, talk to me about the vehicle, they all call it 'your van'. 

I understand what you're saying, but that's merely semantics.

In reality, the house and the van can be taken away from you/your company at any point. The fact that it hasn't happened yet (to you; it happened to me, like I said) doesn't mean that it CAN'T happen. I have been pretty much kicked out just because the landlady decided to do it. I know for a fact that I could kick out my tenant just because I feel like it. 

Given these facts, I can't call them "my car" or "my home". It's an illusion. You can read in the original article that the landlady wants to kick them out of "their" "home" simply because she has seen some dogshit somewhere. If you still believe that's "their" "home", then I guess we'll have to agree to disagree.

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