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Bruce Banner

Yogurt pots in the dishwasher.

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The girl that presents Sky News in the mornings, said, yesterday, that she puts her empty yogurt pots thuough the dishwasher before putting them in the recycle bin. I wonder if she does the same with her empty Spam and corned beef tins.

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I probably would if I had one, and if they got collected, and if I bought yoghurt (don't have a bin to put them in and the supermarket has got rid of its plastic recycling). They might start getting a bit manky before being removed otherwise. A quick rinse would probably suffice but if you're using the dishwasher might as well chuck them in.

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8 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

I probably would if I had one, and if they got collected, and if I bought yoghurt (don't have a bin to put them in and the supermarket has got rid of its plastic recycling). They might start getting a bit manky before being removed otherwise. A quick rinse would probably suffice but if you're using the dishwasher might as well chuck them in.

When you live on an island that has had every house water metered, you don't waste water, or money, washing out recyclable tins, jars and pots. 

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7 minutes ago, Bossybabe said:

When you live on an island that has had every house water metered, you don't waste water, or money, washing out recyclable tins, jars and pots. 

Surely if you're using a dishwasher anyway then there's nothing lost in chucking them in there with the rest, as long as there's some space free. It would be daft to run the dishwasher just for them.

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34 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

The girl that presents Sky News in the mornings, said, yesterday, that she puts her empty yogurt pots thuough the dishwasher before putting them in the recycle bin. I wonder if she does the same with her empty Spam and corned beef tins.


They don't recycle yogurt pots round here.

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Always wash out plastic pots, trays, jars and tins even sardines and tuna by hand, no dishwasher...... actually some of the plastic pots, trays and jars are reused to store items and foodstuffs in, great for seed trays, flowers, jams and chutney, the large lidl yogurt pots are good to store homemade soup in or sourdough, pots and trays great for storing all sorts of foods in freezer.....All the rest is put into recycle bin washed and clean....waste not want not.;)

 

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When I received my first recycling leaflet and bins in 2002 I thought: fine, it was no skin off my nose if they wanted me to put different things in different bins, happy to do that.

Then I read the leaflet and it was a whole list of instructions about what to do with everything including washing it all out.  The leaflet then went into the bin and the recycling bags went into the garage for garden use.

Without hunting down the thread again the only recycling that actually means that less resources are used is recycling aluminium.  The recycling of everything else uses more resources than not recycling and hence is damaging the planet.

 

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9 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Without hunting down the thread again the only recycling that actually means that less resources are used is recycling aluminium.  The recycling of everything else uses more resources than not recycling and hence is damaging the planet.

Plastic, I can possibly see that (although depends on where the energy comes from), but do glass and paper mean using more than it takes to make them from scratch?

Better to not need to chuck as much stuff out to begin with, but that fails badly to our cheap, lots, convenient desire.

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15 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Without hunting down the thread again the only recycling that actually means that less resources are used is recycling aluminium.  The recycling of everything else uses more resources than not recycling and hence is damaging the planet.

 


The first thing to do is reduce.
 

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4 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Plastic, I can possibly see that (although depends on where the energy comes from), but do glass and paper mean using more than it takes to make them from scratch?

Better to not need to chuck as much stuff out to begin with, but that fails badly to our cheap, lots, convenient desire.

I'm assuming (but don't know) that this also takes account of the collection of the waste, processing it, preparing it , and transporting it to the plant.

It may be that for glass making it takes less energy to have used glass in with the sand but the sand has come in in bulk from a quarry; bringing in another 10 or 20% is no big deal.

To get the second hand glass people wash it out, either drive it to a recycling point or have a recycling lorry with several blokes on it come round to collect it.  It then needs to be taken to a central recycling site for your county where it is accumulated and then onto a specialist recycling plant (which coudl be anywhere, even China) where it is sorted by colour (IIRC brown glass just gets chucked) and washed and fragmented.  It is then transported to a glass factory.  Several nice long trips for your empty bottle there.

Does that make any sense at all?  Glass is about the ultimate inert product that won't poison anybody or anything, it's just like stones.  Dig a hole in your garden and throw it in as the Victorians did.   

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The issue is not simply whether less energy is required to say, make more plastic from scratch that to recycle it; it is made from a finite resource, and energy and other resources are also used in waste disposal.

In the case of a yoghurt pot, the decision is whether is better to recycle, or produce another one from scratch and dispose of the old one.

I like to recycle/ reuse as much as possible. I hate waste.

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I'm aiming for glass reuse by building up a collection of beer bottles ready for when I finally get around to trying to brew my own (there's no way I'll get through the whole lot in one go and I'm too unsociable to have anyone to share it with).

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5 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

I'm aiming for glass reuse by building up a collection of beer bottles ready for when I finally get around to trying to brew my own (there's no way I'll get through the whole lot in one go and I'm too unsociable to have anyone to share it with).

Useful too with some petrol and a rag for when the HPC brings down the economy.

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15 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

I'm aiming for glass reuse by building up a collection of beer bottles ready for when I finally get around to trying to brew my own (there's no way I'll get through the whole lot in one go and I'm too unsociable to have anyone to share it with).

Glass bottles and jars very rarely get thrown out there because of making jam and home brewing.
 

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25 minutes ago, happy_renting said:

The issue is not simply whether less energy is required to say, make more plastic from scratch that to recycle it; it is made from a finite resource, and energy and other resources are also used in waste disposal.

In the case of a yoghurt pot, the decision is whether is better to recycle, or produce another one from scratch and dispose of the old one.

I like to recycle/ reuse as much as possible. I hate waste.

I also hate waste.

That is why I don't recycle.

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Apart from paper/card I don't recycle anything privately and view it as a curious mental illness for people who lack perspective and grossly overestimate their own personal impact on the world.

Had a container of gardening tools arrive from China all rusty recently. Can't be recycled easily because they've got plastic handles moulded on so all 60,000 of them are off to landfill. You've got to wash out a lot of yoghurt pots, like a deranged Womble, to compete with that.

 

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14 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Had a container of gardening tools arrive from China all rusty recently. Can't be recycled easily because they've got plastic handles moulded on so all 60,000 of them are off to landfill. You've got to wash out a lot of yoghurt pots, like a deranged Womble, to compete with that.

 


Surface rust? I could have sold them for you. :)
 

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41 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Apart from paper/card I don't recycle anything privately and view it as a curious mental illness for people who lack perspective and grossly overestimate their own personal impact on the world.

Had a container of gardening tools arrive from China all rusty recently. Can't be recycled easily because they've got plastic handles moulded on so all 60,000 of them are off to landfill. You've got to wash out a lot of yoghurt pots, like a deranged Womble, to compete with that.

I'd have thought that if you can smelt iron with all the random crap mixed in with the ore then a few bits of plastic shouldn't be a barrier to it becoming re-refined. Wonder how long it'll be before we're mining old landfills.

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36 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Had a container of gardening tools arrive from China all rusty recently. Can't be recycled easily because they've got plastic handles moulded on so all 60,000 of them are off to landfill. Y

 

Insane.

I suppose the issue is that flooding the market w/ cheap rusty tools at bargain prices will destroy your business model.

I'm thinking the supplier should somehow be able to compensate you for selling rusty stuff, or just accept you'll pay him whatever you can get less your usual margin (presuming that fig is not negative, in which case he should be somehow made to compensate you).

Then again, I suppose it was probably the shipping company's fault in some way. Nightmare, which, as you say makes everything else pale into insignificance and undermines people's goodwill (it obviously has had that effect on you).

Saw a paper recycling plant on new over xmas. Site manager said cardboard in to fresh cardboard out was 30 mins. No small wonder they could not accept pizza boxes and glitter cards.

I guess the same is true of your tools and their plastic handles. Probably a pollution issue as vapourising halo-carbons might not be something the steel plant scrub flue gas for.

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2 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Surely if you're using a dishwasher anyway then there's nothing lost in chucking them in there with the rest, as long as there's some space free. It would be daft to run the dishwasher just for them.

If there's space I'll put glass jars in but I draw the line at yogurt pots. I don't really use canned food. 

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2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm assuming (but don't know) that this also takes account of the collection of the waste, processing it, preparing it , and transporting it to the plant.

It may be that for glass making it takes less energy to have used glass in with the sand but the sand has come in in bulk from a quarry; bringing in another 10 or 20% is no big deal.

To get the second hand glass people wash it out, either drive it to a recycling point or have a recycling lorry with several blokes on it come round to collect it.  It then needs to be taken to a central recycling site for your county where it is accumulated and then onto a specialist recycling plant (which coudl be anywhere, even China) where it is sorted by colour (IIRC brown glass just gets chucked) and washed and fragmented.  It is then transported to a glass factory.  Several nice long trips for your empty bottle there.

Does that make any sense at all?  Glass is about the ultimate inert product that won't poison anybody or anything, it's just like stones.  Dig a hole in your garden and throw it in as the Victorians did.   

It's green glass that has no recycling use, but it doesn't get chucked into landfill always, I believe it gets used as aggregate under driveways etc. I think that's why the green bin at the bottle bank is often tiny or missing altogether.

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56 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

I'd have thought that if you can smelt iron with all the random crap mixed in with the ore then a few bits of plastic shouldn't be a barrier to it becoming re-refined. Wonder how long it'll be before we're mining old landfills.

Often have to send someone to landfill to ensure they're repeatedly driven over with those machines with all metal wheels, they have, to stop stuff being dug up and turning up on ebay.

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56 minutes ago, Sledgehead said:

Insane.

I suppose the issue is that flooding the market w/ cheap rusty tools at bargain prices will destroy your business model.

I'm thinking the supplier should somehow be able to compensate you for selling rusty stuff, or just accept you'll pay him whatever you can get less your usual margin (presuming that fig is not negative, in which case he should be somehow made to compensate you).

Then again, I suppose it was probably the shipping company's fault in some way. Nightmare, which, as you say makes everything else pale into insignificance and undermines people's goodwill (it obviously has had that effect on you).

Saw a paper recycling plant on new over xmas. Site manager said cardboard in to fresh cardboard out was 30 mins. No small wonder they could not accept pizza boxes and glitter cards.

I guess the same is true of your tools and their plastic handles. Probably a pollution issue as vapourising halo-carbons might not be something the steel plant scrub flue gas for.

Branding embossed on the handles. Once upon a time might have jobbed them off to some wholesaler to be disposed of through markets and car boots but these days it can't be risked them selling on ebay for a fraction of the price.

Problem most likely will be them packing them whilst still warm from production, in the factory, causing condensation, it's quite common. Supplier will replace, chances are they subbed off production to some other random selection of factories they use.

Very common occurrence for whole container loads to be a write off. Part of the problem is they don't hold stock and make to order so shove it in containers almost before the paint's dry. Mould on products due to using unclean water, in production, is another common one. Even if it can be wiped off, the labour costs often don't stack up once it's over here.

Brown card waste is fairly forgiving for contamination, I can't ever recall us having anything rejected and god knows what gets thrown in the balers sometimes. I suspect either the councils are having the wool pulled over their eyes on rebates or they're trying increase rebates by submitting it as white paper waste which is too ambitious, given their material source.

 

 

 

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