Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

spyguy

The 1st person in their family to go to Uni

Recommended Posts

As the tag line from the train to be a teacher advert says.......

And probably the last, as I listen to yet another set of parents complain that their kid is earning less than their other sibling who did not spent 3 years and 40k studying - Criminology, English Lit, History. Art etc.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, spyguy said:

As the tag line from the train to be a teacher advert says.......

And probably the last, as I listen to yet another set of parents complain that their kid is earning less than their other sibling who did not spent 3 years and 40k studying - Criminology, English Lit, History. Art etc.

 

Know of quite a few young people who became perpetual students into their late twenties, got a bit infantalized; and then ended up becoming a teacher. I can see it is the obvious choice for those types and they certainly have shown an attachment to Educational Establishments and ability to behave like and be one of the kids to boot. Tbh I had a bit of a phobia about education so took a path out at 15,  teaching would have been my worst nightmare.

On the income thing there probably is a lot to be said for such a secure job and also you have to factor in that the pension is worth about 50% on top of the salary. So a starting wage of 25k is probably closer to 37.5k as a fair comparison to the private sector. Add on another 10k or so for job security and teaching starts to look like a no brainer unless you hate the whole Education gravy train like me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

Know of quite a few young people who became perpetual students into their late twenties, got a bit infantalized; and then ended up becoming a teacher. I can see it is the obvious choice for those types and they certainly have shown an attachment to Educational Establishments and ability to behave like and be one of the kids to boot. Tbh I had a bit of a phobia about education so took a path out at 15,  teaching would have been my worst nightmare.

On the income thing there probably is a lot to be said for such a secure job and also you have to factor in that the pension is worth about 50% on top of the salary. So a starting wage of 25k is probably closer to 37.5k as a fair comparison to the private sector. Add on another 10k or so for job security and teaching starts to look like a no brainer unless you hate the whole Education gravy train like me.

The days of being a perpetual student stopped in the early 80s.

You'd get a 3-4 year grant then thats that.

The couple Im getting earache about will probably go for teaching. They are pretty useless.

There's another lovely girl who, although bright, I dont see ever moving away from her mum of full-time basis - only child and all that.  I'd bet money on her being a science teacher. She'll actually walk it was she is very studious and bright.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teaching

Police

Civil Service

....that's pretty much it here in NI for most people when it comes to non-trade jobs, i.e. those who went to uni so don't want to become a plumber/spark - as in they are the absolute best options in terms of security and benefits. Last time I talked to someone about it, which was admittedly a few years ago, there was a lot of competition for going into teaching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The concept of "first in the family to go to uni" made sense up to the 90s, but as we've gone, in iess than a generation, from 5% to 50% going to uni, the majority of students these days are probably "the first in their family"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I am the first. I have two clever sisters, but they didn't do it.:huh: My mum didn't have the opportunity, and my dad nearly went to a "special" school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Steppenpig said:

The concept of "first in the family to go to uni" made sense up to the 90s, but as we've gone, in iess than a generation, from 5% to 50% going to uni, the majority of students these days are probably "the first in their family"

I'm not sure it made sense then.  It wasn't lack of ability that stopped my parents going to uni; it was lack of opportunity.

The first in the family thing was about widening opportunity but it has gone from letting talented if not rich kids go to letting everybody who can write their name go to some pretend university.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not sure it made sense then.  It wasn't lack of ability that stopped my parents going to uni; it was lack of opportunity.

The first in the family thing was about widening opportunity but it has gone from letting talented if not rich kids go to letting everybody who can write their name go to some pretend university.

I'm not sure whether being able to write your name is still an entry requirement. I think it may have been dropped. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not sure it made sense then.  It wasn't lack of ability that stopped my parents going to uni; it was lack of opportunity.

The first in the family thing was about widening opportunity but it has gone from letting talented if not rich kids go to letting everybody who can write their name go to some pretend university.

Once again I wholeheartedly agree, although in my dad's case, I don't think he would have made it. He wasn't very academic. He did nice woodwork though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was the first. Graduated in '89.

In another generation or two though, some young people might start saying I was the first in my family to buy a house.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My uncle was the first person to go to university in my family and it lead directly to his death in Nigeria in the 1950s. Other than that no one else needed to go to get a good job and own their own house. My youngest is currently at 'uni' studying a subject to get a job that until recently didn't need a degree and where you didn't end up paying for your own training and didn't have to do at least 3 years unpaid part-time work as well.

The current 'uni' trend for 75% of students is nothing but a big fraud they are paying for themselves.

If the occupation needs a degree, fair enough. If it doesn't you are being used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Mr Chewy. One of may mates reckons you are borrowing to  be paying for your own dole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Father was the first, came from a long line of miners and railway men, got into Bradford Grammar and then Oxford, ended up working in British industry with a good salary and pension. He thought it was the greatest opportunity ever, was desperate for one of his sons to go, only i did- ended up a university professor, he thought that was great, the kind of job he always looked up to. His salary paid for a non working wife,  a four bedroom detached house, holidays in france, public school for 3 sons. I cannot afford any of those things. I think in the future 1930-1970  will be viewed as something like the period after the black death that ultimately lead to the peasants revolt, a period in which the average person was put in charge because the ptb had no alternative, The jury system was established as their were no lawyers left alive to judge cases. This lasted until those in power found an alternative as the population grew and murdered the upstarts. Is Wat Tyler in the house?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MrPin said:

Yes Mr Chewy. One of may mates reckons you are borrowing to  be paying for your own dole

Very true. Biggest con on school leavers ever swung.

Youth unemployment had to be managed.

Good wheeze to send 50% of leavers to University.

However, the state maintenance grant system couldn't afford it.

So, bring in fees.

So, yes, many students are just paying their own dole.

It spoiled lives for everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, hotairmail said:

My parents didn't go. But they both did extremely well. They couldn't have done what they did today without a degree and more.

There's a lot of professions now where a degree is essential (e.g. accountancy) that didn't used to need one. For my parents, I wasn't thinking mainly about financial gains (although they definitely made more money as a result) more that it changed their outlook from poor Northern working class to educated middle class and everything that went with it. If they hadn't gone, they'd probably never have left the small towns that they grew up in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheBlueCat said:

There's a lot of professions now where a degree is essential (e.g. accountancy) that didn't used to need one. For my parents, I wasn't thinking mainly about financial gains (although they definitely made more money as a result) more that it changed their outlook from poor Northern working class to educated middle class and everything that went with it. If they hadn't gone, they'd probably never have left the small towns that they grew up in.

A degree might be listed as desirable for accountancy but it's certainly not essential; I know four people who've started their accountancy qualifications in the last couple of years and only one of them had a degree.

Having a degree is beneficial for all jobs in that you are looking for your first job at 21 rather than 18 so you will be more mature and so more likely to get it as long as you don't come across as entitled because you have a degree;  because graduates are ten a penny these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

A degree might be listed as desirable for accountancy but it's certainly not essential; I know four people who've started their accountancy qualifications in the last couple of years and only one of them had a degree.

Having a degree is beneficial for all jobs in that you are looking for your first job at 21 rather than 18 so you will be more mature and so more likely to get it as long as you don't come across as entitled because you have a degree;  because graduates are ten a penny these days.

When it comes to accountancy it depends on whether you want to become a proper qualified accountant in practice, in which case only experience at work would prepare you for it and the ACA and FCA are in service qualifications. Or you just need the degree as a tick box to work in a big organisation such as the NHS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

When it comes to accountancy it depends on whether you want to become a proper qualified accountant in practice, in which case only experience at work would prepare you for it and the ACA and FCA are in service qualifications. Or you just need the degree as a tick box to work in a big organisation such as the NHS.

I was thinking CIMA and at a previous organisation ACCA where people already working; very few of those had degrees but it shouldn't matter and didn't.  I did ACA and yes pretty much everybody doing that had a degree; however I'm not remotely sniffy about which is the best qualification - recruitment is about who are the best people.

Tick boxes for qualifications are getting a bit mad where I work and qualifications that in all reasonable senses are merely desirable have been shifted to the essential column.

I see a big parallel to house prices where many people who could not now afford to buy the houses they live in equally are not (on paper) qualified to do the jods that they have been doing very successfully for thirty or forty years.  Let's throw down even more additional hurdles for the next geenration to overcome shall we?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, longtomsilver said:

Can I balance this to say I was the first person in my family not to go to university. :D 

 

 

Rebel!:huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   61 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.