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bomberbrown

White Van Ban - Homeowners prevented from parking vans on their own property

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Actually where i live a year or so ago residents got a letter about the idea of banning commercial vehicles, this is a new build estate with over 300 flats obvisouly there where so many complaints that the idea was scraped

Remember the letter saying they would need to park in surrounding roads 

 

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My deeds on a house built in 1962 have a no sign written vans clause, as it is a house no one bothers being that up tight and it is probably totally unenforcable by now anyway. There is also a no hedges or fences clause for the front gardens but everyone has one or the other now anyway.

Flats are a different kettle of fish as there are communal areas and a landlord of some description.

Another reason why flats can be too much hassle.

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Yeras ago, possibly as long as 45 years ago I took home a van or somthing to wherever I was living maybe Parson Green. Some council bloke pulled me about leaving a commercial in the street, reckoned it should be in some lorry park.

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Quite a number of times I have seen hand written notes on commercial vehicles parked in residential areas with notes regarding not to park here. I'm indifferent as these guys are probably working hard parking their van on a public road. 

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1 minute ago, Ash4781 said:

Quite a number of times I have seen hand written notes on commercial vehicles parked in residential areas with notes regarding not to park here. I'm indifferent as these guys are probably working hard parking their van on a public road. 

Reverse parking can be quite arduous for some.

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Land isn't property, it's a set of agreements with the state about what you can do and other people can't.

This is quite different from actual property like, say, a cheese grater. 

Can you build on 'your land'? Drill for oil? Kill someone? Etc.  

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3 hours ago, bomberbrown said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-38506338

So, the 'benefits' of owning your own home are......... <_<

 

Vans left on the street are an eyesore and put pressure on on-street parking so putting them on your own driveway is actually doing other residents a favour.  If it's on your own property, I don't care and neither should the council or whoever.

There are idiots who live near my parents' place who leave full sized lorries parked in a residential neighbourhood.  Worst case was a guy who liked to bring home his tipper lorry and park it up on kerbs, totally ruining them.  Didn't want to be bothered driving his own car to/from work.  After he trashed some brand new tarmacked pavement that the council had put down, they finally took action and got him to leave it parked at work.

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Onerous restrictive covenants should be reflected in the valuation and an appropriate discount applied.

Someone mentioned a restriction on hanging out washing in Yorks...these are routine in the USA.

 

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Persimmon are really getting some grief on here...! Shame!

It's far too easy for developers to slap covenants on things like this rather than design in appropriate provisions for van parking, drying lines - especially, as mentioned above, for flats. The local authorities need to be putting more pressure on developers for better design.

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Hanging out the washing is better for the environment as you don't consume electricity using a tumble drier. Sure it devalues the house, and area, temporarily.

Environmental warming scam therefore confirmed. :wacko:

 

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You'd be lucky if you can fit one of those old Fiat 500 cars on a modern new build "drive way", never mind a white van.  Maybe the ban is in place because the back end of the van would go out onto the road.

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2 hours ago, canbuywontbuy said:

You'd be lucky if you can fit one of those old Fiat 500 cars on a modern new build "drive way", never mind a white van.  Maybe the ban is in place because the back end of the van would go out onto the road.

I have seen some developments (2007 completions) where the roads were built at maybe a bit wider than a B road width (is this a size) without pavements on both sides in sections with the occasional pavement on one side . As alot of the houses almost front the road people park outside the houses but you obviously need space to get out of the car. The end result is most of the roads are passable at car width as cars park up on the pavement side. I'm not sure what the bin lorries do or if someone needed an emergency vehicle or wanted to walk along the pavement?

Interesting the cars appear to be parallel parked half on the pavement. It sounds tricky to me. Maybe there is a knack to it!

 

edit: i can only think someone messed up or did not scrutinise the car ownership assumptions?

Edited by Ash4781

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These covenants are largely just to keep things looking neat while the development is initially being sold. Its very difficult to get the house builders interested once they are off site, as it is them who has to pursue a breach of the covenants.

Several friends trying to install sky+ in new build flats have found that there are covenants stoping more than one cable coming off of the dish per property. No use if you want to use a pvr. Housebuilders not interested as the full development has been sold but sky are aware of the covenant and refuse to install extra dishes.

I did read a thread on mse once where the white van covenant was enforced because one of the first tennants on the development proudly parked his 'red hot dutch' branded satellite installation van right at the entrance to the development. 

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The covenants on my faily recent new-build house included no practice of musical instruments!  Also while the developer was on site the place was clean and tidy but more recently it's going downhill with litter etc in spite of a maintenance man who is employed to maintain the communal grass areas.  Some people seem not to care at all about where they live even though most are OO although some are rented out.

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Restrictive covenants are like most other aspects of law, its not whether they exist or not that's the issue so much as whether they're enforced & if so how effectively, 

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1 hour ago, Ash4781 said:

I have seen some developments (2007 completions) where the roads were built at maybe a bit wider than a B road width (is this a size) without pavements on both sides in sections with the occasional pavement on one side . As alot of the houses almost front the road people park outside the houses but you obviously need space to get out of the car. The end result is most of the roads are passable at car width as cars park up on the pavement side. I'm not sure what the bin lorries do or if someone needed an emergency vehicle or wanted to walk along the pavement?

Interesting the cars appear to be parallel parked half on the pavement. It sounds tricky to me. Maybe there is a knack to it!

 

edit: i can only think someone messed up or did not scrutinise the car ownership assumptions?

Newbuild Taylor Wimpey estate near me, double garages with two garage doors and central pillar. Everyone seems to own BMWs or Mercs that are too wide to fit in the garage. But as the house front door opens onto the pavement, the driveway itself is also too short for the cars, which consequently, extend over the pavement and overhang the gutter. Back in the day, the wage bracket or Taylor Wimpey owners would have driven Austin Allegros or Leyland Maxis, how times have changed. No white vans on the estate though, Taylor Wimpey owners around me are too posh for that, I'm the subclass that rents and has a truck.

Edited by LiveinHope

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4 hours ago, Bronson said:

Persimmon are really getting some grief on here...! Shame!

It's far too easy for developers to slap covenants on things like this rather than design in appropriate provisions for van parking, drying lines - especially, as mentioned above, for flats. The local authorities need to be putting more pressure on developers for better design.

I'm not defending, but local planning regs also stipulate how much parking allocated per size of house, i.e. You find with apartments that there isn't enough parking, it's deemed that people are suppose to cycle, walk and use public transport. Bare in mind the majority of old properties also don't have adequate parking as most households probably have 2 or more cars in particular areas. I would find it very hard to buy a new home that has been built in the last 20 years in the south, as most developments will have tandem parking meaning you constantly have to shift one car off the other drive to get the other one out, there is no frontage space which doesn't alow any more external parking if you need to add more. Plus when visitors come they can't park anywhere as the roads tend to be single widths in areas.

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9 minutes ago, LiveinHope said:

Newbuild Taylor Wimpey estate near me, double garages with two garage doors and central pillar. Everyone seems to own BMWs or Mercs that are too wide to fit in the garage. But as the house front door opens onto the pavement, the driveway itself is also too short for the cars, which consequently, extend over the pavement and overhang the gutter. Back in the day, the wage bracket or Taylor Wimpey owners would have driven Austin Allegros or Leyland Maxis, how times have changed. No white vans on the estate though, Taylor Wimpey owners around me are too posh for that, I'm the subclass that rents and has a truck.

The cars though will be lease or company cars;) in reality still might just afford a Ford or Vauxhall if they had to buy, smoke and mirrors. Also hearing stories that people are buying new build due to ease of getting one and the prestige of saying to peers look what I have got, but once you go in the house there is barely a scrap of furniture as they have no money to purchase it. All going to end in tears.

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41 minutes ago, hamish1985 said:

I'm not defending, but local planning regs also stipulate how much parking allocated per size of house, i.e. You find with apartments that there isn't enough parking, it's deemed that people are suppose to cycle, walk and use public transport. 

Snip

Plus when visitors come they can't park anywhere as the roads tend to be single widths in areas.

 

The estate I was referring to has no extra parking and is a single lane, long and winding road, which must be a nightmare if you are the house ate the far end. The nearest parking is at least 3/4 mile away. I don't know how anyone has visitors and as for a house warming party, especially on a rainy night.

 

32 minutes ago, hamish1985 said:

The cars though will be lease or company cars;) 

Snip

All going to end in tears.

 

I shouldn't have used the word owned. They rent their 'home' from the bank, and probably rent their car, their sofa and everything else.

I rent my 'house' privately, and own everything else.

 

Edited by LiveinHope

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2 minutes ago, LiveinHope said:

They rent their 'home' from the bank, and probably rent their car, their sofa and everything else.

Thats it in a nutshell, everything they 'own' is a secured debt. With everything owned by a bank it is in the bnks number 1 priority to keep the value of anything secured with a large loan high. Cars can be tolerated to a degree but houses must be continually inflated in value to keep the debt 'safe' and secured.

People by and large only feel comfortable with large debt if it is seen to have some ultimate value and thus house price inflation is encouraged by the side lending the money and tolerated by the side borrowing it.

New build estates need high house price inflation as generally new-build estate house lose value in the first 5-10 years as why would anyone buy a pre-owned one when you can buy a new one with generally a choice of fittings for the same price with a teaser deal.

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Add in the ever "lets re do our kitchen, bathroom every few years" into the mix from releasing equity or taking out a loan. It seems people have lost all common sense. I do get the feeling people are either going f***k it let's just do and live for today and worry about the consequence later on, or people just seem to think they will magically have a job until they retire with increasing pay rises to pay off the debt! Somehow they are very much deluded, as when they hit there 50s and made redundent as someone younger is cheaper they become unemployable, and end up doing jobs much lower paid. This at present isn't a problem as people in this age group and 60s have mainly paid off their 25 year mortgages years ago, good luck to the mid 30s getting a 35 year mortgage to ever expect to pay that off

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