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Si1

Village halls face bleak future as ageing volunteers dwindle

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Alan West, 69, vice chairman of the now disbanded National Village Halls Forum, said: “The crunch has finally come. We need young people to step forward and get involved in the future of village halls.

“The traditional village hall is the hub of a community. It means people can meet face to face.

“Younger generations sit in front of their screens and communicate via social media these days but in the hall they can actually talk and interact.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/01/02/village-halls-face-bleak-future-ageing-volunteers-dwindle/

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No mate, house prices are ludicrous and 'young people'  wth families have to work two grinding full time jobs just to make ends meet and quite possibly will find themselves retiring well after your own current age if at all. 

 

Oh you're an entitled sounding boomer in an expensive village in the home counties, well I never.

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Our village hall is used almost exclusively by the boomers for their frequent parties, coffee mornings and get togethers, older pensioners don't use it and younger people are too busy working all hours. 

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Made me think.....just imagine:-

  • you could buy a family home (modest 3-bed semi) in a village on a single professional income, and your family had the time and space - as did other families - to consider social aspects like the village hall. 

This is a pure fantasy to most professional workers in 2017, but was a reality to most (professionals) in the 60s, 70s and 80s. 

 

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14 minutes ago, nome said:

Our village hall is used almost exclusively by the boomers for their frequent parties, coffee mornings and get togethers, older pensioners don't use it and younger people are too busy working all hours. 

And keep fit calsses, screwing out even more pensions from the young ...
 

A lot of villages I know have an some sort of generational genocide. You struggle to find people under the age of 40.

Daft really. Goes back to my argument of probate - there's no buyers in wings. Most places have pushed the future buyers out ofthe next years ago. And there's no OAP moving to these places as there is no home help or local services.

'“The crunch has finally come. We need young people to step forward and get involved in the future of village halls.'

No. You need to stop old people moving to villages and throwing out younger people living there.

 

 

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2 hours ago, nome said:

Our village hall is used almost exclusively by the boomers for their frequent parties, coffee mornings and get togethers, older pensioners don't use it and younger people are too busy working all hours. 

If you take 'boomers' as being born between circa 1957 and 1971 (i.e. 46 - 60 years old), then few of them are drawing pensions, and none are drawing the state pension yet. The majority will still be in work:

tfrchart2014large_tcm77-410957.png

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6 minutes ago, newbonic said:

If you take 'boomers' as being born between circa 1957 and 1971 (i.e. 46 - 60 years old), then few of them are drawing pensions, and none are drawing the state pension yet. The majority will still be in work:

tfrchart2014large_tcm77-410957.png

Boomer definitions all start at 1946

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2 minutes ago, Si1 said:

Boomer definitions all start at 1946

The post WW2 baby boom was short lived, and many have already died off. But even if you stretch it to include the two booms, that still doesn't alter the fact that the majority of them are not claiming a pension, or clogging up village halls drinking coffee in the mornings...

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Looking around what we see is more places that are free or for little cost used to socialise face to face, meet people, share hobbies and activities dissapearing.....Pubs and churches turned into homes, libraries youth clubs closing etc.......I am sure a developer who probably lives miles away could convert places like this for profit.......Soon if not careful all that will be left are expensive clubs to join if can afford it or social media isolation.;)

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Quote

“The crunch has finally come. We need young people to step forward and get involved in the future of village halls. "

How quaint.  It even sounds like a social contract.  I still remember the "we rent the land from our grandchildren" social contract.  Now, that's quaint. 

The only problem is that people are selfish, and will tear up any social contract if it benefits them.  And so now houses in villages are unaffordable to younger generations.  No,  grandparents don't rent the land from their grandchildren- they rent it out to their grandchildren.  Innit.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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41 minutes ago, newbonic said:

The post WW2 baby boom was short lived, and many have already died off. But even if you stretch it to include the two booms, that still doesn't alter the fact that the majority of them are not claiming a pension, or clogging up village halls drinking coffee in the mornings...

The boomer argument is the meme used as one of the current divide and rule strategies. Don't look over here, look over there and fight each other for the scraps we occasionally throw your way.

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3 hours ago, nome said:

Our village hall is used almost exclusively by the boomers for their frequent parties, coffee mornings and get togethers, older pensioners don't use it and younger people are too busy working all hours. 

Not actually my experience, these are the typical folk running village halls, chapels and WI...it would take a brave chap or lass under sixty to joing such a gathering.

 

luncheon+club+january+meal+036.JPG

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Boomers are a 20 year demographic born 1945-1965. The numbers drop off after 1960.

The oldest boomers are 70 now.

There's a big bulge currently aged in their late 50 to mid 60s.

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27 minutes ago, One-percent said:

The boomer argument is the meme used as one of the current divide and rule strategies. Don't look over here, look over there and fight each other for the scraps we occasionally throw your way.

No, tot a meme.

Its a genuine demographic phenomena.

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11 minutes ago, spyguy said:

No, tot a meme.

Its a genuine demographic phenomena.

Don't fall for it spy classic distraction whilst the real villains make off with the swag. 

See:

https://www.equalitytrust.org.uk/how-has-inequality-changed

the rich are taking an ever greater proportion of wealth and then encourage the rest to fight over a diminishing slice. 

 

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50 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

Not actually my experience, these are the typical folk running village halls, chapels and WI...it would take a brave chap or lass under sixty to joing such a gathering.


It's a problem not just restricted to village halls. Bee clubs are often run by old people. Many allotment sites are too. 
And that would be fine if they weren't stuck in their ways, resistant to change etc.

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6 minutes ago, SarahBell said:


It's a problem not just restricted to village halls. Bee clubs are often run by old people. Many allotment sites are too. 
And that would be fine if they weren't stuck in their ways, resistant to change etc.

The same's true, for, well, just about everything. I always put it down to them being the people with the time to do so, so most of the time that's probably always been the case. The question isn't why young people aren't joining such things, it's why recently retired aren't (and they're still the ones who have been able to retire, the pensions issue hasn't filtered up to that point yet).

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7 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

The same's true, for, well, just about everything. I always put it down to them being the people with the time to do so, so most of the time that's probably always been the case. The question isn't why young people aren't joining such things, it's why recently retired aren't (and they're still the ones who have been able to retire, the pensions issue hasn't filtered up to that point yet).

I don't think it's that they are retired and have time. I think it's something people used to do a lot more. Join in, be part of something. Some of them have been doing these things for years and years. 

The recently retired who joined our allotment site has very little time - he already has a full range of hobbies and now his elderly parent needs much attention. 

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My boomer parents are very into yachting. My father bought his first yacht in his early 40s which is a mind-boggling pipe dream for my generation, let alone Millennials. The situation in yacht clubs across the UK sounds pretty similar to that of village halls - they have been run by and for the boomer generation for at least the last 20 years. Up until now there has been very little thought given to encouraging a younger generation to get involved, but now, as the article says, it's 'crunch time'. Membership is beginning to dwindle and there is no long-term plan. The aging demographic of current members puts off a lot of new joiners, even if they have the lifestyle that would enable them to get involved.

Credit to the likes of Alan West who at least realises that something needs to be done urgently. However, the reality is that the solution does not lie with the current boomer membership. It lies with younger generations who will dictate if and how they use these facilities. Many of these institutions inevitably will close. What you are seeing here is the beginnings of a generational shift in power. I look forward to its impact finally reaching the housing market in the next few years.

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Aren't many of these to an extent really just NIMBY meetings. Where I live there's hardly anyone under the age of 55 (seriously, there isn't!).

Interesting insight on  Yachting Orsino, I'm sure the same goes for other industries.

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21 minutes ago, Arpeggio said:

Aren't many of these to an extent really just NIMBY meetings. Where I live there's hardly anyone under the age of 55 (seriously, there isn't!).

Interesting insight on  Yachting Orsino, I'm sure the same goes for other industries.

Round my way the Parish council looks like that, and it seems that its sole purpose is to oppose planning applications in the "nice" end of the village and concentrate them all down near the main road/social housing/my end of the village. Very successful at it they are, too. One of them (the Nimby in chief) occasionally knocks at the door with a petition against a new development, always on pseudo altruistic grounds ("flooding risk", "traffic increase" (almost all traffic around here is tourism, not residents, of which there are few) etc etc). Obviously I never sign.

Rather hilariously, a local farmer sold part of a field last year and very quickly a semi-permanent looking gypsy camp has taken hold, with very substantial looking "mobile" homes - now about 30 of them. This field is near the posh end of the village and, of course, they are up in arms. The Nimby in Chief was round just before Christmas delivering leaflets begging for money for a legal fund to challenge some retrospective planning application that will legitimise this settlement (currently planning for one "stable"). How I lolled.

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33 minutes ago, Arpeggio said:

Aren't many of these to an extent really just NIMBY meetings. Where I live there's hardly anyone under the age of 55 (seriously, there isn't!).

Interesting insight on  Yachting Orsino, I'm sure the same goes for other industries.

On meetings there is a demographic probably 80+ that just love them. They love having pseudo power appointing a chairperson, treasurer and secretary. The meetings probably take more time than any actual work that gets done. All this is probably a big turn off for a younger generation

We are talking Rotarians, WI, Village Hall Committees and yep NIMBYs.

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