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Byron

What happened to the compact fluorescent lamp bulb?

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Some years ago when the electricity companies were dishing out free CFLs I changed all my tungsten to CFL.

They have lasted for many years, but now that one or two are failingg, I cannot find any similar ones.

Tesco now only seem to have halogen and LED bulbs.

Do these last as long as CFLs?

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In short yes.

But keep an eye on colour of light as the bright white will turn any room into an Operating Theatre. 

Go slightly warmer than you think you need

 

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LEDs have pretty much taken over from them (and, shock horror, are a new(ish) technology that I like). I wouldn't bother with halogen unless they're all that'll fit. The few I've got (in an old light fitting that looks awful with LEDs in it) are prone to failing from a knock.

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Interesting Byron, I've had multiple call outs for lamps failing regularly and asking if it's a wiring problem.

Best I can do is check the voltage and fit decent replacements or LEDs...

Is she using cheap lamps?

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I still have some stored away with my Toc H lamps.

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I have about 80 CFL lamps stockpiled in a slightly obsessive fashion, from the days when Tesco were selling them for a subsidised 10 pence each. That adds up to about 400mg of mercury I think. At my present rate of use, I will only need to start buying lamps again when I'm 87.

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1 hour ago, Byron said:

My daughter has halogens and they seem to constantly failing.

They don't like vibrations so things like cooker extractor fans or anything else that vibrates the ceiling or where they're mounted murders them.

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You'll likely see a vast improvement with LEDs, but don't get the cheapest ones, acceptably decent ones are also pretty low cost now too. 3 for a tenner at B&Q for their (in house?) Diall brand is as good a place to start as any. If you have a Costco card you could probably get a much better deal than that too. The running costs are so low and the lifetime so long the initial cost hardly matters much given there are lots of options under a fiver.

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7 minutes ago, BristolBuyer said:

I have about 80 CFL lamps stockpiled in a slightly obsessive fashion, from the days when Tesco were selling them for a subsidised 10 pence each. That adds up to about 400mg of mercury I think. At my present rate of use, I will only need to start buying lamps again when I'm 87.

Even at a cost of zero, I'm not sure CFL or halogen/tungsten make sense over LEDs for most applications. For CFL the energy use comparison is far less clear cut, granted.

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1 hour ago, Byron said:

My daughter has halogens and they seem to constantly failing.

Anything that runs at an elevated temperature has a tendency to fail earlier due to thermal stress, hence tungsten and halogens having generally shorter lifespans.

Halogens should be replaced wherever possible not just for energy consumption reasons but also they run so hot they are a real fire hazard. Any combustible material that comes in contact with the back of the lamp holder will likely get close to burning temperature (hence fire regs and enclosed ceiling light fittings). Also does not take long for the heat to badly degrade PVC cable - the heat gasses off volatile components and leaves a brittle plastic behind which is vulnerable to damage. This also often occurs with standard tungsten lamp holders. LED's run way cooler.

Problem with LED's is that the build quality of them varies a lot and many will not have the lifetime they should have.

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It's amazing just how expensive small bulbs are they used to cost pence now they cost about three quid each, I bought a huge flouescent strip for that recently ( a nightmare to fit mind plus taking off the defuser and finding out it was the starter all along).

Really the exception to the rule that manufactured goods have got cheaper. Some things are ten times cheaper but bulbs are ten times more expensive even if they save that in energy.

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20 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

It's amazing just how expensive small bulbs are they used to cost pence now they cost about three quid each, I bought a huge flouescent strip for that recently ( a nightmare to fit mind plus taking off the defuser and finding out it was the starter all along).

Really the exception to the rule that manufactured goods have got cheaper. Some things are ten times cheaper but bulbs are ten times more expensive even if they save that in energy.

The lifetime cost of LEDs is cheaper.

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46 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

The lifetime cost of LEDs is cheaper.

That's what they said about CFLs

I'm not sure quite how many failed because of the tech intrinsic to the CFL. Rather it was the components on the interal pcbs that failed. LED s may well be more durable compared to CFLs but is that the determining factor in their longevity? Has anyone ever had a CFL last for the predicted 8000 hrs? Why then believe LEDs will last for 50k?

Moreover some of the energy savings claimed are wholly unrealistic. I saw one based on 30 bulbs. 30. Who leaves 30 CFLs on all evening? I make do with 4 in the lounge and one in the kitchen. The rest are tuned on only when needed (the crapper etc). So predicted energy saving costs of $30 collapse to more like $4, and then there's the currency conversion. For that price it is simply not worth ordering the things even at zero cost, especially as far as the environment is concerned.

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2 hours ago, SNACR said:

They don't like vibrations so things like cooker extractor fans or anything else that vibrates the ceiling or where they're mounted murders them.

That is quite probably the answer.

Why don't the shitheads who sell this crap tell us?

Why don't our useless politicians protect us?

The idiot Blair apparently agreed with other EU leaders over a cup of coffee to ban tungsten.

When people shout 'Trouserers, troughers, snouters' I listen these days.

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3 hours ago, MrPin said:

I still have some stored away with my Toc H lamps.

My gas lamps are still going very well.  I'm planning on upgrading to candles when they eventually give out

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3 hours ago, One-percent said:

My gas lamps are still going very well.  I'm planning on upgrading to candles when they eventually give out

The radioactive mantles are best.

If you use them often enough, you even glow yourself.

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8 hours ago, BristolBuyer said:

I have about 80 CFL lamps stockpiled in a slightly obsessive fashion, from the days when Tesco were selling them for a subsidised 10 pence each. That adds up to about 400mg of mercury I think. At my present rate of use, I will only need to start buying lamps again when I'm 87.

Yes I have a big pile from all the 6/8 bulbs for a tenner from the electricity co' several years ago.

The first set of bulbs I bought for my parents are still going after 19 years.

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6 hours ago, crashmonitor said:

It's amazing just how expensive small bulbs are they used to cost pence now they cost about three quid each, I bought a huge flouescent strip for that recently ( a nightmare to fit mind plus taking off the defuser and finding out it was the starter all along).

Really the exception to the rule that manufactured goods have got cheaper. Some things are ten times cheaper but bulbs are ten times more expensive even if they save that in energy.

Yes but in the lifetime of that CFL you would have to buy 6-10 tungsten filament or 15-25 in the case of an LED. Add that cost to the energy savings and CFL's / LED's are a no brainer.

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We have these throughout the house:

http://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-gls-led-lamp-clear-bc-4w/4000f

And these in a couple of areas where more light is needed due to larger area to cover e.g. living room:

http://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-gls-led-lamps-white-bc-9w-5-pack/2330j

Missus loves them after CFL.  For under £20, I did the entire house and have a few spares left over.  I would definitely go for the warm white. Recently replaced the bathroom light with this:

http://amzn.to/2hlWNvL (warning it does require minor rewiring of the lamp fitting).  It's rather brighter than the previous 28w bulb. 

 I'm just waiting for the fluorescent tube light in the porch to go and then it will too will be replaced. 

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7 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Yes but in the lifetime of that CFL you would have to buy 6-10 tungsten filament or 15-25 in the case of an LED. Add that cost to the energy savings and CFL's / LED's are a no brainer.

Only on cost. CFLs are horrible, rubbish things and I've only moved off tungsten now that decent LEDs are available.

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8 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Only on cost. CFLs are horrible, rubbish things and I've only moved off tungsten now that decent LEDs are available.

You must be light sensitive. I've never had a problem with the warm light Phillips CFL's. I'd agree though that LED's are a big improvement .

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Not sure if true but I heard that tungsten lights got banned and cfl virtually given away because the power plants were nearing full capacity. Cheaper to give away a load of energy efficient lightbulbs than build more power stations.

Did seem strange to me at the time that mercury batteries were banned yet cfls containing mercury got promoted. Especially as it was obvious that most of the cfls would end up up in landfill.

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19 minutes ago, John51 said:

Not sure if true but I heard that tungsten lights got banned and cfl virtually given away because the power plants were nearing full capacity. Cheaper to give away a load of energy efficient lightbulbs than build more power stations.

Did seem strange to me at the time that mercury batteries were banned yet cfls containing mercury got promoted. Especially as it was obvious that most of the cfls would end up up in landfill.

The Energy co's at the time had to put x % of their profits into energy efficiency and CFL's were an easy one along with loft insulation and cavity wall.

The argument for CFL's was that the tiny amount of mercury in the bulb if released to the environment would only be a small fraction of the mercury emitted from coal fired power station were a tungsten bulb used over a CFL.

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