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Oxford University graduate sues his college for £1m claiming 'appallingly bad boring tuition' led to him getting a 2:1 instead of a first and left him with depression and insomnia

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Oxford University graduate sues his college for £1m claiming 'appallingly bad boring tuition' led to him getting a 2:1 instead of a first and left him with depression and insomnia

Faiz Siddiqui studied modern history at Brasenose College and graduated with a 2:1 in 2000. He claims not receiving a first meant he could not pursue a career in international law.

Just think what today's failing graduates will be suing for!!!  God forbid that you might not be good enough and didn't really have the talent?

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The end game in the financialisation of edutainment. What did they think was going to happen?  In the minds of the students, they are not buying an educational experience with tuition fees, but are buying the qualification. 

I actually fail some of my students, much to the horror of managers.  I can see why, as I can guarantee that all failed students will put in a formal complaint. 

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Well said Mr 1%, maybe mr noddy studied law

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It's just a consequence of dumbing down school exams so much. No one ever fails now so people automatically think they'll get the marks they want. But out in the big bad world, they find they're just not as good as they thought they were.

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2 minutes ago, The Generation Game said:

Most of the mechanical engineers I taught had designs on a job in the city. Complete waste of time for all involved. Would be better for everybody to give them 4-year unpaid internships in the city. 

Ah, but then all those employed in the edutainment business would be out of work. 

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2 hours ago, One-percent said:

The end game in the financialisation of edutainment. What did they think was going to happen?  In the minds of the students, they are not buying an educational experience with tuition fees, but are buying the qualification.

He graduated in 2000 so wouldn't have paid much in the way of tuition fees.

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3 hours ago, One-percent said:

The end game in the financialisation of edutainment. What did they think was going to happen?  In the minds of the students, they are not buying an educational experience with tuition fees, but are buying the qualification. 

I actually fail some of my students, much to the horror of managers.  I can see why, as I can guarantee that all failed students will put in a formal complaint. 

Does no one actually approach the Lecturer and ask why and how they might improve for the resit / resubmission?

Thats what happened in my day....

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10 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Does no one actually approach the Lecturer and ask why and how they might improve for the resit / resubmission?

Thats what happened in my day....

Don't need to as it's the lecturers fault. They didn't teach the subject right.

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14 hours ago, The Generation Game said:

Most of the mechanical engineers I taught had designs on a job in the city. Complete waste of time for all involved. Would be better for everybody to give them 4-year unpaid internships in the city. 

Oddly enough most of the people I worked with in the City (my only graduate role (as a non-graduate - working my way up (eventually that route was stopped)) had degrees in engineering and I used to tell them they had taken a place from somebody who might have liked to have been an engineer.  Explains why we have been so short on engineers.

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7 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

Oddly enough most of the people I worked with in the City (my only graduate role (as a non-graduate - working my way up (eventually that route was stopped)) had degrees in engineering and I used to tell them they had taken a place from somebody who might have liked to have been an engineer.  Explains why we have been so short on engineers.

We are not and never have been short of engineers over the last few decades. 100'000's have actually gone through the profession and been ditched at various times over the same timescale, a lot never to return as their skills didn't quite match exact requirements for alternative posts in the short term or they simply turned their back on the profession  having realised quite how badly paid, resourced, respected and supported their positions and opportunities were.

 

 

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As so often, Libby Purves writing in the Times,, has an incisive piece on this.  

She suggests a rewrite of Kipling's 'If':

'If you can shed your tears and speak your grievance

And tell yourself it's surely not your fault,' 

Etc. 

She's always well worth reading.  

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Mrs Bear said:

As so often, Libby Purves writing in the Times,, has an incisive piece on this.  

She suggests a rewrite of Kipling's 'If':

'If you can shed your tears and speak your grievance

And tell yourself it's surely not your fault,' 

Etc. 

She's always well worth reading.  

 

 

 

I was thinking of another "IF "  ie the movie , given the state of the education system  :D

 

 

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Despite this looking like another Millenial Entitlement thing, I am going to give this guy the benefit of the doubt based upon my University experience. My lecturers were piss poor at teaching and their attendance rate was worse than the students, 50%, maybe less. By my third year I jsut stopped going in unless I had to say sit an exam or ahnd in coursework. The free tutorials I found online along with about £200 worth of books proved better than what the University was delivering. I ended up very depressed too during this time, I was overwhelmed and received little to no help at all from the University, nor did the other students. University was the worst £18K I ever spent.

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He got a 2-1 from Oxford in History - pretty bloody good really and a privilege. Most people in that position would be delighted and made a career for themselves. He's had 16 years since to make something of himself and apparently not getting an extra grade has made him a failure at getting a career in Law, unrelated to his degree. He needs to suck it up. Only one person to blame.

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I've also got some sympathy. My MSc was diabolically bad. It was in Bioinformatics so was a mix of biology, computer science and maths. The biology aspect was mostly sitting in with final year biologists/biochemists. I'd actually done these courses the previous year and a lot of my classmates who'd gone through two years of biosciences found it difficult - the computer scientists, mathematicians and physicists had no hope of following it. Many of them had asked if there were any aspects of biology they should be reading up on before the course started and were told there was no need. Computer science similarly started by putting us in a course on C with third year computer scientists. The maths wasn't overly hard but the lectures were boring enough to make you lose the will to live. 

The organisers had gotten away with crappy teaching in previous years by having a roughly even split of biologists, computer scientists and mathematicians/physicists on the course. Our year was very biologist heavy though so while it was easy enough for us to tutor the others in the biology section of the course there weren't enough computer scientists to help us with the computer science aspects. This also meant that there weren't enough computer scientists to have one on each team for our database project so there were multiple teams that just had biologists on them and we didn't have a clue what we were doing. I got practically shouted at in my project viva because my report explained what we did, discussed the problems we had with that approach and detailed what I'd do differently if I was to do it again (i.e. a pretty standard report for when you've realised too late into a project that the methodology was flawed). This was too negative apparently - I think the real issue was that it made the head of the course realise that the course was shit. 

I went into that course raring with enthusiasm. I came out demoralised and depressed having learned absolutely nothing.

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5 hours ago, longtomsilver said:

Oddly enough most of the people I worked with in the City (my only graduate role (as a non-graduate - working my way up (eventually that route was stopped)) had degrees in engineering and I used to tell them they had taken a place from somebody who might have liked to have been an engineer.  Explains why we have been so short on engineers.

The corrolary is that after you trained them, they were qualified engineers, who instead chose another career, increasing the damand for (and theoretically, salaries of) engineers.

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4 hours ago, John51 said:

If anyone with the same tutors as him got a first, surely that destroys his case. 

Very good point. Ask MrPin if you can have an honorary Law Degree from the Piniversity.

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From my university days (study and working there), @This time's experience is typical of many MSc courses. Basically they are cobbled together from undergrad courses with an added bit of free research for your supervisor's pet project.  Never ever do your MSc  at the same university you did your BSc at if it's remotely related for your first degree.

As for the subject of the OP, it actually sounds like they had a great university teaching experience compared to most. One crappy course in three years isn't a bad hit rate. 

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3 hours ago, Renewed Investor said:

Despite this looking like another Millenial Entitlement thing

He's not a Millennial, he was born in the 1970s

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2 hours ago, happy_renting said:

Very good point. Ask MrPin if you can have an honorary Law Degree from the Piniversity.

When I get the cheque.:huh:

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