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Homeopathy in US must be labelled to say "do not work"

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Now, the US government is requiring that producers of such items ensure that if they want to claim they are effective treatments, then they need to make available the proof. Otherwise, they will need to point out that there is “no scientific evidence that the product works”. The Federal Trade Commission has demanded that producers of homeopathic treatments say on the label that they do not work.  Independent

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Just state they may not 'work' but do in terms of a placebo. And in that case even the most ardent of anti 'weird' science bods have admitted there is some proof.

Job done. 

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http://www.britishhomeopathic.org/what-is-homeopathy/homeopathy-and-the-nhs/

' In the UK there are over 400 GPs practising homeopathy who are regulated by the GMC and are members of the Faculty of Homeopathy. They treat around 200,000 NHS patients per year with homeopathy. GPs are able to refer NHS patients to qualified and regulated homeopaths and most private health insurance companies and cash-plans consider homeopathic treatment a good investment.'

 

Fckme!

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4 minutes ago, spyguy said:

http://www.britishhomeopathic.org/what-is-homeopathy/homeopathy-and-the-nhs/

' In the UK there are over 400 GPs practising homeopathy who are regulated by the GMC and are members of the Faculty of Homeopathy. They treat around 200,000 NHS patients per year with homeopathy. GPs are able to refer NHS patients to qualified and regulated homeopaths and most private health insurance companies and cash-plans consider homeopathic treatment a good investment.'

 

Fckme!

I wonder what all this mumbo jumbo costs the taxpayer.

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22 minutes ago, spyguy said:

http://www.britishhomeopathic.org/what-is-homeopathy/homeopathy-and-the-nhs/

' In the UK there are over 400 GPs practising homeopathy who are regulated by the GMC and are members of the Faculty of Homeopathy. They treat around 200,000 NHS patients per year with homeopathy. GPs are able to refer NHS patients to qualified and regulated homeopaths and most private health insurance companies and cash-plans consider homeopathic treatment a good investment.'

 

Fckme!

That's depressing.

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5 minutes ago, Futuroid said:

In a post-fact world, surely everything works.

As long as you say it does.

Well that's the premis that uk gubberment has been using for the last 20 years

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My Dad, a pharmacologist, scoffed at homeopathy.

A cat of his was giving birth and one of the kittens was not breathing and he and the vet tried everything to start it. In the end they gave up. The vet's wife whipped out a bottle of 'rescue remedy' and dosed the 'dead' kitten. It sprang into life and went on to live a normal cat life. Much to the astonishment of both men. Just because current science cannot explain something do not dismiss it. The Stirling engine was invented in 1816 and nobody could fully explain how it worked until 1958. Radio waves travelling through a vacuum still qualify as a miracle because science cannot properly explain it. Nobody in the middle ages could do geometry or complex maths yet  Salisbury cathedral was built and still stands using techniques poorly understood even today. The wooden scaffold inside does not hold the steeple up, it holds it down.

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The vast majority of people who I've come across who believe in homeopathy are women. Indeed, had a conversation with a group of women recently and my (subtle, honestly!) critique of it saying there's no proof it works other than placebo effect was ignored. It's a bit like women seem more superstitious than men. I think there's an element of faith in homeopathy despite the lack of factual proof, and women are more easily, err, persuaded.

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23 minutes ago, Travisher said:

My Dad, a pharmacologist, scoffed at homeopathy.

A cat of his was giving birth and one of the kittens was not breathing and he and the vet tried everything to start it. In the end they gave up. The vet's wife whipped out a bottle of 'rescue remedy' and dosed the 'dead' kitten. It sprang into life and went on to live a normal cat life. Much to the astonishment of both men. Just because current science cannot explain something do not dismiss it. The Stirling engine was invented in 1816 and nobody could fully explain how it worked until 1958. Radio waves travelling through a vacuum still qualify as a miracle because science cannot properly explain it. Nobody in the middle ages could do geometry or complex maths yet  Salisbury cathedral was built and still stands using techniques poorly understood even today. The wooden scaffold inside does not hold the steeple up, it holds it down.

I would like to by some of "rescue remedy" may wear is as a little bottle medallion around my neck with "bring me to life" instructions, just in case I have a problem.    

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54 minutes ago, mikthe20 said:

The vast majority of people who I've come across who believe in homeopathy are women. Indeed, had a conversation with a group of women recently and my (subtle, honestly!) critique of it saying there's no proof it works other than placebo effect was ignored. It's a bit like women seem more superstitious than men. I think there's an element of faith in homeopathy despite the lack of factual proof, and women are more easily, err, persuaded.

You Capricorns ....

 

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3 hours ago, 200p said:

uh oh, this is going to get a lot of people "triggered".

Even though I know the futility of arguing on the internet and the utter futility of arguing with waterheads about homeopathy, I must admit I can't resist the bait of responding to misleading anti-vaccination and anti-organ donation posts.  It's the thought of someone coming to real harm (dying of measles, missing out on a transplant) because someone else read some unchallenged nonsense on the internet that bothers me.

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3 hours ago, spyguy said:

http://www.britishhomeopathic.org/what-is-homeopathy/homeopathy-and-the-nhs/

' In the UK there are over 400 GPs practising homeopathy who are regulated by the GMC and are members of the Faculty of Homeopathy. They treat around 200,000 NHS patients per year with homeopathy. GPs are able to refer NHS patients to qualified and regulated homeopaths and most private health insurance companies and cash-plans consider homeopathic treatment a good investment.'

 

Fckme!

My old man has an interesting theory on this: he says that many people that go to the doctor are peeved off if they don't get prescribed pills. Simply saying "you've got a cold, I won't give you anything because you'll be back on your feet anyway by tomorrow" is not acceptable. It's a sure sign of an incompetent doctor.

So doctors tacitly encourage homeopathy on the basis that it's just water, it can't do any harm & it gets rid of the annoying know-all patients.

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Ah ha doctors! Does that hurt? You tell me, you're the doctor.:huh:

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Some of it is psychological.

A syringe is more effective than elixir, an elixir is more effective than a capsule, and a capsule is more effective than a bog standard tablet.

Go figure, when the active ingredient is a placebo.

Oh and a syringe with a 8 inch needle is the nuclear option.

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Placebo treatment works well on imaginary diseases.

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16 minutes ago, DeepLurker said:

My old man has an interesting theory on this: he says that many people that go to the doctor are peeved off if they don't get prescribed pills. Simply saying "you've got a cold, I won't give you anything because you'll be back on your feet anyway by tomorrow" is not acceptable.

This is true.

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3 hours ago, DeepLurker said:

My old man has an interesting theory on this: he says that many people that go to the doctor are peeved off if they don't get prescribed pills. Simply saying "you've got a cold, I won't give you anything because you'll be back on your feet anyway by tomorrow" is not acceptable. It's a sure sign of an incompetent doctor.

So doctors tacitly encourage homeopathy on the basis that it's just water, it can't do any harm & it gets rid of the annoying know-all patients.

I thought that was why suppositories are so often subscribed in FrancE. Hardly going to go to the doctor with a cold if the result is sticking something up your jacksie. ( this is also why suppositories are never given in Germany - they'd all be in the GP on the slightest sniffle). 

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The French too are fond of bum pills, and it is quite a good way to deliver medicine, er, if you need it.

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