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SarahBell

Stats on death

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(A) Dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, has overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death in England and Wales, latest figures reveal.

Last year, more than 61,000 people died of dementia - 11.6% of all recorded deaths.

(B) All types of cancer as a group was still the most common cause of death overall

Both sentences are from the following bbc article. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37972141

Most common =/= leading?

So they can bundle together dementia for a headline but not cancer?

If we're all living longer, what would they like us to die from?

 

 

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9 minutes ago, spyguy said:

How do you die of dementia?

Normally they don't.

They die of secondary infections, falls, heart failure, pneumonia etc. The dementia just makes them more vulnerable.

Not all senile dementia is caused by Alzheimer's either.

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Well, thats my point.

Peolle dont die from dementia. They become more and more frail.

But youd be hard pressed to say xyz died as a result of dementia.

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Alzheimer's was sited as one cause of death on my mother's death certificate.

Another way of interpreting the news is that we have made so much progress treating/preventing other causes, more people now live long enough to die from dementia. It isn't that something has made people more vulnerable to dementia, other than time itself.

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11 hours ago, spyguy said:

Well, thats my point.

Peolle dont die from dementia. They become more and more frail.

But youd be hard pressed to say xyz died as a result of dementia.

No one has ever died of AIDS, it just renders a person unable to deal with some other illness. But they wouldn't have died from a cold otherwise, so on a second order analysis, it was what killed them. Maybe that's how it is viewed with dementia deaths.

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11 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

Normally they don't.

They die of secondary infections, falls, heart failure, pneumonia etc. The dementia just makes them more vulnerable.

Not all senile dementia is caused by Alzheimer's either.

This is the question had arisen in my mind when it was stated on the radio; why they couldn't provide an explanation as you have just done escapes me.

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11 hours ago, spyguy said:

Well, thats my point.

Peolle dont die from dementia. They become more and more frail.

But youd be hard pressed to say xyz died as a result of dementia.

 

What he said.

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My Mother's death certificate said that she died of dementia because some cocky young doctor who was in the hospital decided to write it down. When I went to pick up the certificate from the records office the records staff offered to go find a doctor to give a different cause. This was 10 years ago. I was in such a mess at the time that I simply did not have it in me to go through another battle. I felt as if I was going to die that day also.

My Mum had been in hospital for months with failing lungs, pneumonia and MRSA that she picked up in the hospital. In the end the doctors pumped her full of morphine.

Was dementia really the result of my Mum dying? No, of course not. But it made the doctors feel better.

(Sorry, this is already too painful for me to recall even 10 years later.).

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Clearly the longer people are living the more they will be exposed to degenerative, incapacitating illnesses.

Christopher Eccleston video for Alzheimers Research

 

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1 minute ago, Alonso Quijano said:

Clearly the longer people are living the more they will be exposed to degenerative, incapacitating illnesses.

 

Indeed; it's the very nature of medicine.  You find a cure for the biggest early killers and then find that there are further diseases lurking for the people who survive those and they need a cure.  Cure cancer and dementia and there will be something else that hasn't been a big problem because people have died earlier from these other diseases.

It is a sign of how good medical progress is that dementia is now up there as so many other things have been cured.

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3 minutes ago, Alonso Quijano said:

Clearly the longer people are living the more they will be exposed to degenerative, incapacitating illnesses.

Christopher Eccleston video for Alzheimers Research

 

In which xase surely the solurtion is to have some form of cut off and let peple die.

 

My Nan lived about 1 year longer than she should had.

She was just a knackered old cabbage when she clinically died.

My Nan died about a year before her clinical death.

Its just pointless make work for the NHS, which they do very badly, and at great costs of distress to the family and pain and discomfort to the old person.

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Just now, Frank Hovis said:

Indeed; it's the very nature of medicine.  You find a cure for the biggest early killers and then find that there are further diseases lurking for the people who survive those and they need a cure.  Cure cancer and dementia and there will be something else that hasn't been a big problem because people have died earlier from these other diseases.

It is a sign of how good medical progress is that dementia is now up there as so many other things have been cured.

Well, medical progress.

Whether its 'good' or not can be argued.

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Just now, spyguy said:

Well, medical progress.

Whether its 'good' or not can be argued.

Good in my opinion; I think these things should be recognised for the real triumphs that they are.

I posted another thread about how the HIV / AIDS immimnent death sentence of the 80s has now been transformed into people living normal lengthy lives with surprisingly little fanfare.

I don't see the curing of certain diseases meaning that you inevitably get loads of very old people in a near zombie like state; I know or have known several people who have lived very active lives into their 80s and in some cases 90s; if you look at the people swimming in the sea in winter a lot of them are in their 60s or 70s.  Astounding IMHO.  

Your future is not necessarily sitting in an adult nappy with the TV on all day.

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51 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Good in my opinion; I think these things should be recognised for the real triumphs that they are.

I posted another thread about how the HIV / AIDS immimnent death sentence of the 80s has now been transformed into people living normal lengthy lives with surprisingly little fanfare.

I don't see the curing of certain diseases meaning that you inevitably get loads of very old people in a near zombie like state; I know or have known several people who have lived very active lives into their 80s and in some cases 90s; if you look at the people swimming in the sea in winter a lot of them are in their 60s or 70s.  Astounding IMHO.  

Your future is not necessarily sitting in an adult nappy with the TV on all day.

You're spot-on for me, except I don't have a TV.

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13 hours ago, spyguy said:

How do you die of dementia?

Last two deaths in the family definitely dementia...mother in law 83, great aunt 96. Both stopped eating owing to loss of brain function.

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There must be data somewhere that shows the NHS costs spiralling in tandem with the smoking ban.

Heart attacks are generally quick and cheap, years in a vegetative state costs you know

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6 minutes ago, choochoo said:

There must be data somewhere that shows the NHS costs spiralling in tandem with the smoking ban.

Heart attacks are generally quick and cheap, years in a vegetative state costs you know

Indeed the country looks pretty f%%ked. You really can't compare debt to GDP stats now with post war and think we can get out of the hole twice. Then we really hadn't promised ourselves the moon in retirement in health and pension benefits. In the Mother-in law's case she did pay for her nursing care at £52,000 per year until death but there were still eye watering drug and top up pension bills to be paid. My partner stands to inherit nothing, which tbh is ok, i think pensioners shoould pay their way before we are completely crippled by public sector debt.

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Just now, choochoo said:

There must be data somewhere that shows the NHS costs spiralling in tandem with the smoking ban.

Heart attacks are generally quick and cheap, years in a vegetative state costs you know

Plus the lack of tax take.  When hospitals are refusing to treat smokers because they smoke they are turning away net contributors.

There are real problems coming from this as the NHS and adult social care costs will spiral as you say; I would say that there are no easy answers but the NHS lobby always has an easy one: give us more money.

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