Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The Masked Tulip

Finland Will Become the First Country in the World to Get Rid of All School Subjects

Recommended Posts

Quote

 

Finland’s education system is considered one of the best in the world. In international ratings, it’s always in the top ten. However, the authorities there aren’t ready to rest on their laurels, and they’ve decided to carry through a real revolution in their school system.

Finnish officials want to remove school subjects from the curriculum. There will no longer be any classes in physics, math, literature, history, or geography.

 

https://brightside.me/wonder-curiosities/finland-will-become-the-first-country-in-the-world-to-get-rid-of-all-school-subjects-259910/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds pretty stupid, but it is only for 16 plus.

 

Incidentally Finnish education has been on the decline for a few years, was previously number 1, nowjust in the top 10.  Naturally it is on the decline just as British educators sign off on trips to study it.  

 

Various Asian countries are in the top positions now.  But not sure that British educators would like the conclusion that they come to about those systems i.e. that the way to get to the top is to work your ass off while under huge pressure to achieve from parents and teachers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, reddog said:

Sounds pretty stupid, but it is only for 16 plus.

 

Incidentally Finnish education has been on the decline for a few years, was previously number 1, nowjust in the top 10.  Naturally it is on the decline just as British educators sign off on trips to study it.  

 

Various Asian countries are in the top positions now.  But not sure that British educators would like the conclusion that they come to about those systems i.e. that the way to get to the top is to work your ass off while under huge pressure to achieve from parents and teachers.

The truth is a little more complex than that. The Asians place a huge importance on fact. They know a lot about a lot, but they still lag in the application and advancement of knowledge. Whether you think the Asians are really the best all depends on your opinion on what education is really for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They've seen Sweden press the self destruct button and think "we're having some of that!".

Why be all grown and sensible, studying and working hard to earn a living, when the Germans will do that for you and then give you their money?  Isn't the EU marvelous!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great way to create a whole population that have a fully rounded education.  Unfortunately, it is a relatively poor way to create the next generation of scientists and engineers.  As was mentioned in the full article -- what use is advanced calculus for the vast majority of the population?  Oh, apart from those who actually need advanced calculus, for whom it is essential, and who can't do what they need to do without it...

Being positive, the scientists and engineers that you do create this way will be nicely rounded, which might be beneficial in terms of entrepreneurship etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sounds like the further feminisation of education. Working in groups?cooperation? bah!

How about individual excellence. How about being so damn good at something that you make others jealous of your super human brilliance. Bwahahahaha!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, hotairmail said:

A great idea. Basically the subject separation we have today is largely thanks to Aristotle. I've often wondered what links and breakthroughs in knowledge could be made if we could breakdown the thinking straitjackets we have placed on ourselves. However, I suspect in the absence of structure....chaos. I would rather see an ambitious attempt to draw a new structure.

To be fair to Aristotle, his approach seems to have been associated with a few advancements over the last 2300 years...

[Allthough with educating my own children I use a more Socratic method, which seems to work okay -- which is, I guess, more like what they are talking about in Finland.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that this means that various subjects are not compartmentalised, it does not mean that the subject matter will no longer be taught. And students will be less able to avoid subjects they don't like by not taking the particular subject.

I'd say it is an interesting experiment, and might prove to be successful. Worth watching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

And by taking the course ”Working in a Cafe," students will absorb a whole body of knowledge about the English language, economics, and communication skills.

This system will be introduced for senior students, beginning at the age of 16. The general idea is that the students ought to choose for themselves which topic or phenomenon they want to study, bearing in mind their ambitions for the future and their capabilities. In this way, no student will have to pass through an entire course on physics or chemistry while all the time thinking to themselves “What do I need to know this for?

Utterly depressing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Utterly depressing.

And a bizarre assumption, given the 16-18 age range to which this applies, that anybody would take A Level Physics or Chemistry despite not wanting to do it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The traditional format of teacher-pupil communication is also going to change. Students will no longer sit behind school desks and wait anxiously to be called upon to answer a question. Instead, they will work together in small groups to discuss problems.

The Finnish education system encourages collective work, which is why the changes will also affect teachers. The school reform will require a great deal of cooperation between teachers of different subjects. Around 70% of teachers in Helsinki have already undertaken preparatory work in line with the new system for presenting information, and, as a result, they’ll get a pay increase.


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, mikthe20 said:

Have they actually trialed somewhere this to see if it works or are they just going in all guns blazing?

Group hugzzz teaching has been used in England for a good number of years. It has worked incredibly well

 

 

oh wait....

Professor Alison Wolf, an expert in public policy, found only 45% of 16-year-olds achieve a C in GCSE maths and Engish

From the grauniad

And in the Pisa tables, England is ranked just over half way up

https://fullfact.org/education/what-you-dont-find-out-about-englands-educational-performance-pisa-league-table/

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So in effect secondary school is going to be an extension of primary school? Where you may as well stay with the same teacher all day long as they're qualified to teach you about everything.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Instead of individual subjects, students will study events and phenomena in an interdisciplinary format. For example, the Second World War will be examined from the perspective of history, geography, and math.

"History,geography and maths"  they'll have to refer to the internet for the rest.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, billybong said:
Quote

Instead of individual subjects, students will study events and phenomena in an interdisciplinary format. For example, the Second World War will be examined from the perspective of history, geography, and math.

"History,geography and maths"  they'll have to refer to the internet for the rest.

That's OK, Nazi's are bad is all you need to know for "debate" on the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, One-percent said:

Group hugzzz teaching has been used in England for a good number of years. It has worked incredibly well

Of course, how could I possibly forget, you're quite right!

I remember when I was younger that it felt as if the whole of human civilisation was wanting to move forward - space travel, new medicines, nuclear power, electronics at home and in our pockets, fewer wars (in the west), protecting nature and endangered species, more democracies (again in Europe with fall of dictatorships), etc,etc. It was exciting, it was hopeful, it felt like we all as a species wanted to progress and learn - these were the real "progressives". 

Now, it seems that we know it all, that effort and making new discovers is no longer desired, that there is nothing to learn from history, that there is nothing more to achieve as a species or civilisation. Sad, and weird. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mikthe20 said:

Of course, how could I possibly forget, you're quite right!

I remember when I was younger that it felt as if the whole of human civilisation was wanting to move forward - space travel, new medicines, nuclear power, electronics at home and in our pockets, fewer wars (in the west), protecting nature and endangered species, more democracies (again in Europe with fall of dictatorships), etc,etc. It was exciting, it was hopeful, it felt like we all as a species wanted to progress and learn - these were the real "progressives". 

Now, it seems that we know it all, that effort and making new discovers is no longer desired, that there is nothing more to achieve as a species or civilisation. Sad, and weird. 

Also, the knowledge of which you speak is challenging and hard work to comprehend. The special snowflakes taking part in education must not be challenged to actually think.  It it too much like hard work. Instead, they must be nurtured carefully, engaged and active in their learning. Above all, they must be entertained. 

Afterall, they are all going to millionaires by winning X factor so no need to work hard at school innit 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, One-percent said:

Also, the knowledge of which you speak is challenging and hard work to comprehend. The special snowflakes taking part in education must not be challenged to actually think.  It it too much like hard work. Instead, they must be nurtured carefully, engaged and active in their learning. Above all, they must be entertained. 

Afterall, they are all going to millionaires by winning X factor so no need to work hard at school innit 

Indeed, maybe that's the reason - the whole "nobody can fail", "no competition" crap means that everything is dumbed down and little effort is required.

Case in point: it seems that language GCSEs (my daughter did last year) are simply a case of learning by rote (an oral and written exam are both just memorising sounds and texts) - no understanding of the language being learnt is required to achieve an A-grade, no ad-hoc conversation takes place (the kids can give a selection of questions they are to be asked by the examiner for which they have prepared answers!). I was astonished, and saddened, as I speak several languages and want my kids to be proficient in at least one other. I'm teaching them myself partly when I can but am paying a real teacher/tutor (not the state-sponsored one) to teach them properly, and not to just pass an exam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, mikthe20 said:

Indeed, maybe that's the reason - the whole "nobody can fail", "no competition" crap means that everything is dumbed down and little effort is required.

Case in point: it seems that language GCSEs (my daughter did last year) are simply a case of learning by rote (an oral and written exam are both just memorising sounds and texts) - no understanding of the language being learnt is required to achieve an A-grade, no ad-hoc conversation takes place (the kids can give a selection of questions they are to be asked by the examiner for which they have prepared answers!). I was astonished, and saddened, as I speak several languages and want my kids to be proficient in at least one other. I'm teaching them myself partly when I can but am paying a real teacher/tutor (not the state-sponsored one) to teach them properly, and not to just pass an exam.

Scouse doesn't count as a language !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, mikthe20 said:

Indeed, maybe that's the reason - the whole "nobody can fail", "no competition" crap means that everything is dumbed down and little effort is required.

Case in point: it seems that language GCSEs (my daughter did last year) are simply a case of learning by rote (an oral and written exam are both just memorising sounds and texts) - no understanding of the language being learnt is required to achieve an A-grade, no ad-hoc conversation takes place (the kids can give a selection of questions they are to be asked by the examiner for which they have prepared answers!). 

Gosh that's crap. We had an oral examination in French. You had to write and learn a story and then were asked questions about it. That was O levels. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, SarahBell said:

Gosh that's crap. We had an oral examination in French. You had to write and learn a story and then were asked questions about it. That was O levels. 

 

Yes, me too. Technically, the exams are still very similar, there's still the oral examination and the listening comprehension, so as a parent I thought things hadn't really changed much until it came to helping my daughter revise - it's just almost completely scripted now. It's funny how they are taught to "learn a language" by rote but learning the times table and other things by rote is a no-no!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A further interesting point, as told to me by a teacher, is that students studying English lit are no longer expected to read the whole book.  Just sections and synopsis   :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   101 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.