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SarahBell

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I honestly think we're getting ridiculous about kids now but then I probably go a bit against the grain as I'm quite free range with my parenting with the ultimate aim to raise confident, independent young adults. 

This someway reminded at my youngest leaving primary. The primary school was a small bubble of cotton wool. They weren't allowed off the bus a 11 without an adult being there to meet them yet within a few months they're on the secondary school bus getting off in droves without a backwards glance from the driver.

Then the adults wonder why they're so unprepared for dealing with the transition and why we're breeding a generation of precious snowflakes. 

 

 

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Think of the children!

 

I'd say unleash the full might of hard Brexit upon him. What do EU regulations say about children left on their own?

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53 minutes ago, LiveinHope said:

don't most 11 year-olds have mobile phones now ?

It was probably OK. After all, it was a Luxury B&B. (grief this country has got so up its 4rse)

And the under 12 rule is a guideline.  The law isn't very specific on the issue.  Gove hasn't done anything wrong.

I'd say that it is more reasonable to have one 11 year old being left alone because they're mature enough and another 13 year old being supervised because they're not, than to have a cliff-edge law where all 11.9 year olds are not given any freedoms at all, but at 12.1 they're one their own every evening because they're now old enough.

42 minutes ago, Battenberg said:

I honestly think we're getting ridiculous about kids now but then I probably go a bit against the grain as I'm quite free range with my parenting with the ultimate aim to raise confident, independent young adults. 

This someway reminded at my youngest leaving primary. The primary school was a small bubble of cotton wool. They weren't allowed off the bus a 11 without an adult being there to meet them yet within a few months they're on the secondary school bus getting off in droves without a backwards glance from the driver.

Then the adults wonder why they're so unprepared for dealing with the transition and why we're breeding a generation of precious snowflakes. 

Well, to be fair to the schools it is a reasonable response to the differing sensibilities of the parents -- at primary have a blanket ban on freedom, at secondary just leave them to it.  I'd advise any parent with a child in the last year of primary to make sure their child has some responsibilities (and pretty pronto if they have none) -- walking to/from school (or at least a leg, if the distance is too great / roads too busy / parents too precious) with their friends, being alone in the house on occasion, responsibility for something at home (bins out, preparing table for food, anything) -- because if they don't it'll be a sharper lesson when September eventually comes...

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If you're old enough to travel to school on your own you're old enough to stay in a hotel on your own for a few hours. Travelling to school exposes a child to accidents and "stranger danger" a million times more than the bedroom of a luxury hotel. 

I think this is more to do with the media's hatred of Michael Gove (I have actually met him and did find him to be quite unpleasant).

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When I was 11 being left alone for a few hours to get on with my Spectrum playing would have been great. 

 

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3 hours ago, Battenberg said:

I honestly think we're getting ridiculous about kids now but then I probably go a bit against the grain as I'm quite free range with my parenting with the ultimate aim to raise confident, independent young adults. 

This someway reminded at my youngest leaving primary. The primary school was a small bubble of cotton wool. They weren't allowed off the bus a 11 without an adult being there to meet them yet within a few months they're on the secondary school bus getting off in droves without a backwards glance from the driver.

Then the adults wonder why they're so unprepared for dealing with the transition life and why we're breeding a generation of precious snowflakes. 

 

 

Agree......so many kids these days do seem to be wrapped in cotton wool.....then we wonder why so many are scared and anxious about life, and the risks of living.

From the age of 9 or 10 walked nearly two miles to school and back daily crossing various roads.....went out all day on a Saturday traveling miles on buses age 11 to 13 with friends, no mobile phones....grant all children are different but creating a fear only breeds fear.....fearful parents have fearful kids. ;)

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52 minutes ago, winkie said:

Agree......so many kids these days do seem to be wrapped in cotton wool.....then we wonder why so many are scared and anxious about life, and the risks of living.

From the age of 9 or 10 walked nearly two miles to school and back daily crossing various roads.....went out all day on a Saturday traveling miles on buses age 11 to 13 with friends, no mobile phones....grant all children are different but creating a fear only breeds fear.....fearful parents have fearful kids. ;)

I used to walk past a volcano full of alligators, on my way to school.:(

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7 minutes ago, MrPin said:

I used to walk past a volcano full of alligators, on my way to school.:(

Were they eating tapas the other side of a pool?

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9 minutes ago, MrPin said:

I used to walk past a volcano full of alligators, on my way to school.:(

Bet you got to school snappy..!

XYY

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Just now, The XYY Man said:

Bet you got to school snappy..!

XYY

I went on a pogo stick, dressed up as a creepy clown.

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12 minutes ago, MrPin said:

I used to walk past a volcano full of alligators, on my way to school.:(

Never ceased to amaze me what people used to put in their front gardens.....;)

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1 hour ago, winkie said:

Agree......so many kids these days do seem to be wrapped in cotton wool.....then we wonder why so many are scared and anxious about life, and the risks of living.

From the age of 9 or 10 walked nearly two miles to school and back daily crossing various roads.....went out all day on a Saturday traveling miles on buses age 11 to 13 with friends, no mobile phones....grant all children are different but creating a fear only breeds fear.....fearful parents have fearful kids. ;)

And probably more children did get hurt then. It seems the choice is that, or wrapping them up in cotton wool and creating bloody useless excuses of human beings. Call me heartless if you want but I prefer the former, even with the cost. It was a sad day when I first started noticing industrial security fencing around primary schools (and I noticed that even before I got annoyed with it appearing alongside railways in the middle of nowhere).

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5 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

And probably more children did get hurt then. It seems the choice is that, or wrapping them up in cotton wool and creating bloody useless excuses of human beings. Call me heartless if you want but I prefer the former, even with the cost. It was a sad day when I first started noticing industrial security fencing around primary schools (and I noticed that even before I got annoyed with it appearing alongside railways in the middle of nowhere).

 

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27 minutes ago, winkie said:

Never ceased to amaze me what people used to put in their front gardens.....;)

Gnomes are infectious! One person gets one, then all the neighbours do!

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9 hours ago, winkie said:

Never ceased to amaze me what people used to put in their front gardens.....;)

Indeed. My Aunt used to indulge in pornographic topiary. Her hedges used to frighten horses.

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Biggest risk to kids under 16 is cars esp. stupid bints dropping kids of at school - driving whilst head turned to the back seat, shouting at kids, having  a mobile conversation,  driving/parking on the pavement, speeding to get an empty parking slot, parking on the school crossing, doing crap u-turns across a narrow road which involves driving and reversing onto the pavement full of kids.

All witnessed by me each time I walk the kids up to primary.

Why cant we have a 2 mile car exclusion around schools?

 

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2 hours ago, spyguy said:

Biggest risk to kids under 16 is cars esp. stupid bints dropping kids of at school - driving whilst head turned to the back seat, shouting at kids, having  a mobile conversation,  driving/parking on the pavement, speeding to get an empty parking slot, parking on the school crossing, doing crap u-turns across a narrow road which involves driving and reversing onto the pavement full of kids.

All witnessed by me each time I walk the kids up to primary.

Why cant we have a 2 mile car exclusion around schools?

 

So true. I watched a woman rear end another car last week. I stopped in order to give my details as a witness as it was clearly her fault and people that careless often lie when it comes to what they tell the insurers. She got out of the car and tearfully told the people she crashed into she was sorry but had been distracted by the children in the back! 

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1 hour ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Given the density of schools in the urban areas that would effectively prevent cars from performing any useful function.

And voila! another problem solved.
 

Kids should walk to primary school. Parents should walk them when they're little and they should learn road safety and progress to walking on their own.

Every child ferried to school (esp. secondary school) is another arsehole egit who has no road sense.

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8 hours ago, SarahBell said:

And voila! another problem solved.
 

Kids should walk to primary school. Parents should walk them when they're little and they should learn road safety and progress to walking on their own.

Every child ferried to school (esp. secondary school) is another arsehole egit who has no road sense.

Not that I go because my kids use the bus but our secondary school has banned the parents from entering and leaving the car park during a set time because the little darlings can't be trusted not to have their heads down looking at their phones. 

It's easier for the school to ban cars than teach the kids how to exit school safely.

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Entirely depends on the kid.

i recall being left at home (with my mother working nearby) with my brothers when were 10 and 12.

My middle brother decided to make chips, and somehow managed to ignite the chip pan. He ran out crying to get mum (which would have been enough time to burn the house down), and I just chucked a wet towel over it and turned the gas off, something I'd seen in various fire safety videos. 

So we had a slightly blackened ceiling, but no major property damage or loss of life. A lot to thank the UK Firebrigade safety videos for.

 

 

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