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10 poorest areas in N.Europe, 9 in England Wales / N.I. Richest is London

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35 minutes ago, interestrateripoff said:

Go recovery. I thought Thatcher fixed the UK economy it's like it was all just bo11ocks and the sick man of Europe is fecked.

Perhaps TPTHB let the brexit vote through, so they could do a deal to annexe London. Then build a fence / trench around the top of the M25 & cut off the poor rest of Uk  / wales  like a gangrenous limb. Scotland gets independance .. bingo ...sorted ! 

 

:rolleyes:

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London contains some of highest levels of poverty in Western Europe - because only the very rich and desperately poor can afford to live there. Beware averages when you try to imply Belgravia and Barking are similar.

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Blimey charlie, if those figures are right, that is a massive gulf of inequality in the UK.

9 out of 10 of the poorest area in Northern Europe, sheesh..

(suppose the stats are a bit misleading, as only comparing the richer Europeran States and excluding Spain, Italy et all, but still, is pretty shocking)

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Here is a very good paper on the affect of the destruction of manufacturing jobs and the areas where it happened.Its the best iv seen on the subject and how it ties in with welfare spending.It should be noted a lot of the destruction in the 80s was because sterling was too high because interest rates were too high to try to cool southern house prices.There was also very little understanding at the time how closing a factory to save £1 million a year would end up costing £10 million+ in long term welfare spending.(Nobody considered single parents would marry the state once men couldnt earn enough).They even mention that Brown planned to simply tax a southern finance boom to pay for northern benefits (rather than have an industrial policy).Very interesting read.

http://www4.shu.ac.uk/research/cresr/sites/shu.ac.uk/files/cresr30th-jobs-welfare-austerity.pdf

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3 minutes ago, durhamborn said:

Here is a very good paper on the affect of the destruction of manufacturing jobs and the areas where it happened.Its the best iv seen on the subject and how it ties in with welfare spending.It should be noted a lot of the destruction in the 80s was because sterling was too high because interest rates were too high to try to cool southern house prices.There was also very little understanding at the time how closing a factory to save £1 million a year would end up costing £10 million+ in long term welfare spending.(Nobody considered single parents would marry the state once men couldnt earn enough).They even mention that Brown planned to simply tax a southern finance boom to pay for northern benefits (rather than have an industrial policy).Very interesting read.

http://www4.shu.ac.uk/research/cresr/sites/shu.ac.uk/files/cresr30th-jobs-welfare-austerity.pdf

Thanks - I'll stick this on my Kindle and give it a quick read. If I can get past the optical illusion on the cover!

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2 hours ago, durhamborn said:

Will have a look at that later.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:8smI3B5impAJ:http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/how-1billion-of-eu-money-has-benefited-south-yorkshire-1-7383999%2Bregion+one+funding+south+yorkshire&client=firefox-b&hl=en&ct=clnk

It's clear that the EU regeneration funding South Yorkshire has received hasn't really generated an improvement in comparison to the rest of Northern Europe.

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2 hours ago, durhamborn said:

There was also very little understanding at the time how closing a factory to save £1 million a year would end up costing £10 million+ in long term welfare spending.

How the feck they did not see that is beyond me.  What did they think would happen when there were no jobs?

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36 minutes ago, One-percent said:

How the feck they did not see that is beyond me.  What did they think would happen when there were no jobs?

I guess they thought fairies would create new jobs for those made redundant..... or people would just become entrepreneurs after losing their jobs and new wealth created.  The mining communities have never recovered.

Although I suspect it was also just short term thinking and it will be someone else's problem to solve.

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In the typical snobbish  English way they looked down on manufacturing and manual work, assuming it was just what people who didnt go to university like they did were forced to do. The assumption was academic education, university expansion, plus the service sector would solve it all. It must have also been a convenient way to fracture the unions following the conflict in the seventies.

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51 minutes ago, nothernsoul said:

 It must have also been a convenient way to fracture the unions following the conflict in the seventies.

Hoping not to sound like a class war nutter here but this was (and still is) a key driver. Organised labour has power.  Power to fight for a decent wage, decent conditions and a reasonable pension. It does not compute with a globalised, trickle up economy. 

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On 10/24/2016 at 2:05 PM, MARTINX9 said:

London contains some of highest levels of poverty in Western Europe - because only the very rich and desperately poor can afford to live there. Beware averages when you try to imply Belgravia and Barking are similar.

+1

Apparently it's GDP per capita but doesn't take into account house prices.  For top bankers and the like it's great.  Great that is if you want to live in congestion central - not that the congestion contagion isn't spreading out more and more to the rest of Britain of course.

Edited by billybong

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For the poorest regions, all they're doing is measuring the effect of sterling.  I seriously doubt that these figures were calculated in the past 3 months when the value of sterling declined 20%.

Also, GDP per capita is not really the best measure for how wealthy an area is.  Yes, London has a very high GDP, but it also has the highest rates of child poverty in the UK.  GDP per capita does not reflect quality of life for most people.  It strikes me that Amsterdam is not listed as one of the top ten richest places in Europe, though Paris is.  Quality of life for the majority of Ile de France is abysmal, in crime infested banlieues, while the Randstad in the Netherlands has just about the highest quality of life in the world. 

 

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14 minutes ago, One-percent said:

Hoping not to sound like a class war nutter here but this was (and still is) a key driver. Organised labour has power.  Power to fight for a decent wage, decent conditions and a reasonable pension. It does not compute with a globalised, trickle up economy. 

Labour no longer has the power to strike in an effective manner due to debt. One day seems the maximum. Nothing like the 70s. Although union power has not been totally undermined.

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4 minutes ago, interestrateripoff said:

Labour no longer has the power to strike in an effective manner due to debt. One day seems the maximum. Nothing like the 70s. Although union power has not been totally undermined.

Having stood on picket lines in the past, 'I can't afford to strike' was the rallying cry of those crossing said line.  This was around 15 years ago.  It's a case really of they could not afford not to, which is why we now have zero hour contracts, non union (EE and the rest) labour driving down wages and a general shafting of working drones by employers 

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8 hours ago, interestrateripoff said:

Labour no longer has the power to strike in an effective manner due to debt. One day seems the maximum. Nothing like the 70s. Although union power has not been totally undermined.

The new lowest-level working class are Eastern Europeans.  They are the least likely to complain about conditions and will put up with what we would consider terrible wages.  

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8 hours ago, One-percent said:

Having stood on picket lines in the past, 'I can't afford to strike' was the rallying cry of those crossing said line.  This was around 15 years ago.  It's a case really of they could not afford not to, which is why we now have zero hour contracts, non union (EE and the rest) labour driving down wages and a general shafting of working drones by employers 

The entire leftwing have become the useful idiot proponents of neo-liberalism.  They see only one side of the coin: to question uncontrolled immigration is racist. Therefore, they refuse to see the opposite side of that coin: uncontrolled immigration promotes/creates exploitative work practices because the worst paid people in the UK are immigrants who are the least likely to unionise and push back against exploitation. And when there's no push back, all worker's rights slowly get eroded. Now we have zero hour contracts, decade-long wage stagnation/deflation - all reflected in the statistics revealed in this thread's article.

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On 24/10/2016 at 2:05 PM, MARTINX9 said:

London contains some of highest levels of poverty in Western Europe - because only the very rich and desperately poor can afford to live there. Beware averages when you try to imply Belgravia and Barking are similar.

Yes, the inequality can be clearly seen in places where the richest live alongside or up the road to the poorest, I suppose it is the poor that help to keep the rich rich......anyway you don't have to be rich to feel rich. ;)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/11802315/Mapped-Where-affordable-meets-desirable-the-best-places-to-live-in-Britain.html

Edited by winkie

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On 10/24/2016 at 4:44 PM, Si1 said:

10 places with most competitive export labour costs in northern Europe.

This, absolutely. 

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16 hours ago, durhamborn said:

Here is a very good paper on the affect of the destruction of manufacturing jobs and the areas where it happened.Its the best iv seen on the subject and how it ties in with welfare spending.It should be noted a lot of the destruction in the 80s was because sterling was too high because interest rates were too high to try to cool southern house prices.There was also very little understanding at the time how closing a factory to save £1 million a year would end up costing £10 million+ in long term welfare spending.(Nobody considered single parents would marry the state once men couldnt earn enough).They even mention that Brown planned to simply tax a southern finance boom to pay for northern benefits (rather than have an industrial policy).Very interesting read.

http://www4.shu.ac.uk/research/cresr/sites/shu.ac.uk/files/cresr30th-jobs-welfare-austerity.pdf

You've posted this before, a few times,and I'll +1 this again.

a lot of futures were thrown on many bonfires in establishing the 'success' of London and surrounding area.

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Well if places like Shropshire, Lincolnshire Wolds, Cornwall  and Ceredigion are the poorest places to live in Europe then please  make me poor. Probably the happiest people in Europe too.

Edited by crashmonitor

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