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interestrateripoff

'I'm not a charity': £148m Lotto winner EVICTS disabled family friend because she can't afford £250 rent rise - as he says she doesn't realise 'how lucky she is'

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'I'm not a charity': £148m Lotto winner EVICTS disabled family friend because she can't afford £250 rent rise - as he says she doesn't realise 'how lucky she is'

Kym Mills claims she and her 23-year-old daughter Keera are being evicted from their Cambridgeshire home which is owned by £148m lottery winner Adrian Bayford because he's asked for £750 rent. Ms Mills previously paid £500 and as Mr Bayford is the disabled mother's employer, her daughter claims he knows she cannot afford it. Mr Bayford claims the new monthly sum is still half the price the home, in his large Cambridge estate, is worth. Pictured, Adrian and Gillian Bayford after their huge lottery win in 2012, when they were still close friends with Ms Mills.

I wonder what the truth is in all this.  On face value a nice 50% increase in rent and clearly he needs the money.

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36 minutes ago, interestrateripoff said:

'I'm not a charity': £148m Lotto winner EVICTS disabled family friend because she can't afford £250 rent rise - as he says she doesn't realise 'how lucky she is'

Kym Mills claims she and her 23-year-old daughter Keera are being evicted from their Cambridgeshire home which is owned by £148m lottery winner Adrian Bayford because he's asked for £750 rent. Ms Mills previously paid £500 and as Mr Bayford is the disabled mother's employer, her daughter claims he knows she cannot afford it. Mr Bayford claims the new monthly sum is still half the price the home, in his large Cambridge estate, is worth. Pictured, Adrian and Gillian Bayford after their huge lottery win in 2012, when they were still close friends with Ms Mills.

I wonder what the truth is in all this.  On face value a nice 50% increase in rent and clearly he needs the money.

Are there not limits to the the increase in rent?

 

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There's probably a little bit more to it than the Daily Fail's article indicates - but he certainly comes over as a complete chunt based on what they do say. If I had that sort of money at my disposal, the last thing I'd be worrying about is getting an extra £250/month extra in rent. Talk about what shall it profit a man if he inherits the earth & loses his soul eh?

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The main mistake seems to have been his ex wife inviting her friend to live on their estate, before divorcing him.

 

Having said that, it would have been easier for him the offer her £50k to relocate or something like that.

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You could possibly think he was less of an **** if he had earned that money (having come from nothing) and therefore knew the value of it. Not wanting someone to get a free meal ticket off his hard work or some other similar rationale. The fact he "inherited" it via the lottery and did not earn a penny of it, makes him look like a total **** quite frankly.

I must admit I would personally not help out friends if I won the lottery as these situations can develop years down the line. Money feeds dependency and it always spoils relationships. I would like to think I'd be very generous when seeing them and perhaps organise some free group holidays etc., do it that way. I would sort the family out with a few mill each and then be done with it.

 

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1 hour ago, spyguy said:

Are there not limits to the the increase in rent?

 

In fact there are no limits to greed, which if it was not so prevalent, we would not have political parties that pandered to it and thus no house price inflation issue. 

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22 minutes ago, SillyBilly said:

You could possibly think he was less of an **** if he had earned that money (having come from nothing) and therefore knew the value of it. Not wanting someone to get a free meal ticket off his hard work or some other similar rationale. The fact he "inherited" it via the lottery and did not earn a penny of it, makes him look like a total **** quite frankly.

I must admit I would personally not help out friends if I won the lottery as these situations can develop years down the line. Money feeds dependency and it always spoils relationships. I would like to think I'd be very generous when seeing them and perhaps organise some free group holidays etc., do it that way. I would sort the family out with a few mill each and then be done with it.

 

Yep, far from helping them he created a dependent by the sounds of it, and then got pissed off with the situation feeling like he was being taken advantage of. Its like depression - no matter how much money you have, a feeling of discomfort can still hit you. To be fair to him, we've all been there probably to some degree.

I know I've been in situation numerous times where by helping out a mate, I've set a precedent where they feel they can always count on me to get them out of a jam, no matter how trivial and inconvenient to me and they end up getting narky when I try to teach them to fish instead of serving up a cod supper on a plate.

Still a total tit no doubt, but I can see what might be going on in his head.

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I helped a mate out who was down on his luck, put him up in my spare room for cheap. Money he saved on cheap lodging his spent on booze and he ended up in hospital. I learned a lesson.

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11 hours ago, Wayward said:

I helped a mate out who was down on his luck, put him up in my spare room for cheap. Money he saved on cheap lodging his spent on booze and he ended up in hospital. I learned a lesson.

Yeah. Thats repeated all round the country with subbed accomodation for drunks. They spend the savings on booze.

They should take all their cash off them.

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When I read this, I thought it was a chance to get back at his ex-wife. I assume that his ex-wife was friends with this woman and not him.

On a wider note I really don't want to win the lottery so don't play it, to avoid situations like this mainly.

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51 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

When I read this, I thought it was a chance to get back at his ex-wife. I assume that his ex-wife was friends with this woman and not him.

On a wider note I really don't want to win the lottery so don't play it, to avoid situations like this mainly.

Sounds like he should never have bought a country estate. Went from owning a small shop to employing 40+ people, totally unfit. Should have stayed as he was and not had any worries. Probably not enjoying his life one bit. £148 million and a bungalow in a stunning location would suit me.

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Agreed, he would have been much happier moving to a modest 5 bed somewhere and keeping quiet. No good can come from everyone knowing you have £148M suddenly. I remember when they first went public they said they'd carry on as normal.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, hotairmail said:

I think the eradication of 'want' and all the extra free time would be a tremendous shock to most people. Don't forget most are kept happy by keeping themselves busy, not needing to think. But when you have money, you can quickly sate your ephemeral desires before more is needed.

I know I posted this video the other day, but I think the conclusion was a good one, of what he would actually like most from becoming a rich man was being able to study the 'good book' and have the time to debate it with the rabbis. Now, it need not be religious, but one would certainly need some sort of higher calling whether it be religion, charity, philosophy or whatever to keep you happy in your sudden elevation to a higher state in society.

 

 

No financial worries, a beautiful 'wild' place, and all the time in the world to think would suit me fine

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1 hour ago, hotairmail said:

I think the eradication of 'want' and all the extra free time would be a tremendous shock to most people. Don't forget most are kept happy by keeping themselves busy, not needing to think. But when you have money, you can quickly sate your ephemeral desires before more is needed.

I agree up to a point. I don't know if most people are "happy" keeping themselves busy, probably just too busy to notice how miserable things are. If you're lucky enough to have pleasant company and pleasant surroundings (two things that are hugely important to quality of life, and that the UK is desperate to eliminate instead of increase) then you need far less time spent being busy. But still some I think, and I think that most people have a fairly basic desire to feel that they're being useful, so doing something meaningful with that busy time.

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2 hours ago, LiveinHope said:

No financial worries, a beautiful 'wild' place, and all the time in the world to think would suit me fine

This is the mistake that most people make. You would still have financial worries. Sure, you wouldn't be concerned by a mortgage payment or gas bill, but your nearest and dearest will come knocking (as will everyone else). Having that amount of money when nobody else around you does, clearly ruins relationships. 

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32 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

This is the mistake that most people make. You would still have financial worries. Sure, you wouldn't be concerned by a mortgage payment or gas bill, but your nearest and dearest will come knocking (as will everyone else). Having that amount of money when nobody else around you does, clearly ruins relationships. 

The main mistake is assuming that people will handle the fact you now have what they consider to be a limitless supply of money.

They won't. 
 

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1 hour ago, spunko2010 said:

This is the mistake that most people make. You would still have financial worries. Sure, you wouldn't be concerned by a mortgage payment or gas bill, but your nearest and dearest will come knocking (as will everyone else). Having that amount of money when nobody else around you does, clearly ruins relationships. 

Other than my very nearest and dearest, what the rest think wouldn't interest me. I said a 'wild' place ;) I have 3 friends, a partner and 4 relatives (at the moment), who, with £148 million, I'd see were alright, and even if the win was £5 million they'd each get a bit, say £50k apiece, and they'd get whatever is left when I die, and if they're still around.

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4 hours ago, LiveinHope said:

Other than my very nearest and dearest, what the rest think wouldn't interest me. I said a 'wild' place ;) I have 3 friends, a partner and 4 relatives (at the moment), who, with £148 million, I'd see were alright, and even if the win was £5 million they'd each get a bit, say £50k apiece, and they'd get whatever is left when I die, and if they're still around.

Yes, a nice bungalow overlooking some countryside would be a dream for me. Plush campervan for some UK and continental trips...I'd be in heaven. When it boils down to it I'd have a similar amount of people I'd want to help out, if I won £150M I'd give £5M to each of my closest relatives and tell them that is it. As far as I am concerned that is a ridiculous amount of money and if they burn through that and come back to me they are not the sort of people I'd want to have around me anymore. I suspect I'd die with most of the money still there, there is not that much I want for. I really don't think I'd be in the Rolls garage or buying a yacht, a nice BMW would be adequate!

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