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ChewingGrass

The Internet of Chinese Things or ICT for short

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Bearing in mind the hoo-ha over DNS attacks facilitated by the Internet of things last week isn't it obvious that most of these gadgets will inevitably be of chinese origin and hence potential electronic fith columnists.

Just thinking.

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ICT is also an acronym for "In-Circuit Test" - and in that particular guise, it pays me a handsome living..!

 

XYY

 

                                                                                                               

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

 

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I have a Chinese Xiamo Redmi Note 3 smartphone..... Sourced from bangood or one of those firms. Should I be worried?

 

Not that I am....

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58 minutes ago, Gigantic Purple Slug said:

In terms of security threats there are much more serious ones from companies supplying telecoms infrastructure.

The comedy with Hwaaaweeee is that theres so much risk on somany levels.

- Monopoly risk. They are pricing low, shipping high and driving competitors outs.

- Chinese crap equipment risk. QAs not there. At all. Never will now.

- Chinese security risk - its staffed by the Red Army signals division.

- Financial risk - they pay out shares to employees, its a massive Ponzi.

- Unlicensed tech risk - a *lot* of stuff is still copied from other companies, still! There's a risk youll be sued by a Western tech company or using Haaawee tech.

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9 minutes ago, spyguy said:

The comedy with Hwaaaweeee is that theres so much risk on somany levels.

- Monopoly risk. They are pricing low, shipping high and driving competitors outs.

- Chinese crap equipment risk. QAs not there. At all. Never will now.

- Chinese security risk - its staffed by the Red Army signals division.

- Financial risk - they pay out shares to employees, its a massive Ponzi.

- Unlicensed tech risk - a *lot* of stuff is still copied from other companies, still! There's a risk youll be sued by a Western tech company or using Haaawee tech.

My bold.

Did plenty of research before I bought and accepted the risk it was possible the thing wouldn't arrive. £130 for a smart-phone that is as good as if not better than my previous nexus 5. which was 3 times the price.

Had it about 6 weeks so far and can't fault it. Have ordered another for her indoors.

 

I though the Red Army was Russian?

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14 minutes ago, geezer466 said:

My bold.

Did plenty of research before I bought and accepted the risk it was possible the thing wouldn't arrive. £130 for a smart-phone that is as good as if not better than my previous nexus 5. which was 3 times the price.

Had it about 6 weeks so far and can't fault it. Have ordered another for her indoors.

 

I though the Red Army was Russian?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Workers'_and_Peasants'_Red_Army

 

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The realistic threat of either the Russian or Chinese wishing to invade Britain is pure media scaremongering.

They've frankly got enough on their hands, with their own populations, without the extra burden of pacifying this country's work shy tax credit junkies.

 

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2 hours ago, paulokes said:

I for one would like to welcome our Chinese toaster overlords...

P

French crooner foresaw all this nearly 20 years ago

 

 

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2 hours ago, geezer466 said:

I have a Chinese Xiamo Redmi Note 3 smartphone..... Sourced from bangood or one of those firms. Should I be worried?

 

Not that I am....

Looking at one of these for my next phone - recommended? Importing OK?

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23 minutes ago, Alonso Quijano said:

Looking at one of these for my next phone - recommended? Importing OK?

I never had any issues at all. You get a tracking page to see when it leaves China, arrives in Singapore and then at the door. No duty to pay either.. Took just over three weeks from order to delivery emailed every step of the way and a procedure similiar to ebay's to claim if it doesn't arrive. (cannot comment on the worth of that though).

As always DYOR...... This will be a good start and put me on to the products. Have another phone on order and will soon be looking to upgrading my CCTV system to all 1080 hd system.

http://www.hotukdeals.com/tag/xiaomi

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1 hour ago, SNACR said:

The realistic threat of either the Russian or Chinese wishing to invade Britain is pure media scaremongering.

They've frankly got enough on their hands, with their own populations, without the extra burden of pacifying this country's work shy tax credit junkies.

 

Not sure why either Russia or China would openly engage in a highly visible DDoS attack. Given that surprise is a vital element in conflict what sense would it do make to warn your opponent of their weaknesses in advance.  I would expect them to be far more subtle and to have a definite aim rather than stopping people posting shite on Twitter. Of course, just flooding your opponent with dodgy tech gear and then watching Black Hat hackers making use of it for their own nefarious purposes might come under the category of an oblique attack

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4 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

The West wanted cheap and that is what they have got.

Security costs money and no one ever got their end of year bonus by suggesting to their bosses that they spend more of that.

Which is why CEOs need to be jailed for security failures. There are already fines of upto 4% of global turnover available thanks to European regulations, but really they need to make it more painful than that.

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16 hours ago, spyguy said:

The comedy with Hwaaaweeee is that theres so much risk on somany levels.

- Monopoly risk. They are pricing low, shipping high and driving competitors outs.

- Chinese crap equipment risk. QAs not there. At all. Never will now.

- Chinese security risk - its staffed by the Red Army signals division.

- Financial risk - they pay out shares to employees, its a massive Ponzi.

- Unlicensed tech risk - a *lot* of stuff is still copied from other companies, still! There's a risk youll be sued by a Western tech company or using Haaawee tech.

So if I want a purely "British manufactured" phone, my options would be?

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19 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

So if I want a purely "British manufactured" phone, my options would be?

two tins and a bit of string from the £ store. Cant be hacked.

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16 hours ago, geezer466 said:

My bold.

Did plenty of research before I bought and accepted the risk it was possible the thing wouldn't arrive. £130 for a smart-phone that is as good as if not better than my previous nexus 5. which was 3 times the price.

Had it about 6 weeks so far and can't fault it. Have ordered another for her indoors.

 

I though the Red Army was Russian?

Im ok taking the hit on a redmi phone for 130£.

The QA risk im on about is commiting several million to buying lots of comms infrastructure only to find it catches fire, or i get sued by (non chinese) company, who've had their ip lifted.

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13 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

Not sure why either Russia or China would openly engage in a highly visible DDoS attack. Given that surprise is a vital element in conflict what sense would it do make to warn your opponent of their weaknesses in advance.  I would expect them to be far more subtle and to have a definite aim rather than stopping people posting shite on Twitter. Of course, just flooding your opponent with dodgy tech gear and then watching Black Hat hackers making use of it for their own nefarious purposes might come under the category of an oblique attack

Really?

Both Russia and China operate large hacking groups. 

Russia brought down Estonias infrastructure.

China operates a large scale spying/industrial espionage programme.

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1 hour ago, Hail the Tripod said:

So if I want a purely "British manufactured" phone, my options would be?

Dont care about phones.

Or rather, i avoid smart phones unless im 100% of the software.

Its less about chinese or british. its about trust. 

You can trust western producers. Sure theyll throw access codes to spys but thy are running large scale espionage programmes. China will throw money at getting any little bit of industrial knowledge. Western giv fo not run non milatary industrial espionage.

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14 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

Not sure why either Russia or China would openly engage in a highly visible DDoS attack. Given that surprise is a vital element in conflict what sense would it do make to warn your opponent of their weaknesses in advance.  I would expect them to be far more subtle and to have a definite aim rather than stopping people posting shite on Twitter. Of course, just flooding your opponent with dodgy tech gear and then watching Black Hat hackers making use of it for their own nefarious purposes might come under the category of an oblique attack

"We can screw you up any time we like". Modern version of gunboat diplomacy.

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12 hours ago, spyguy said:

Really?

Both Russia and China operate large hacking groups. 

Russia brought down Estonias infrastructure.

China operates a large scale spying/industrial espionage programme.

Many of the IoT devices used in the attack had both  login and password set to 'admin' and port 23 wide open for telnet attacks. No need to be a hacking genius to compromise those sorts of systems. Once you have set up with a payload then it is just a question of pointing them at the target and lighting the blue touch paper. It is ironic that the internet is designed to survive nuclear war but can be bought to its knees by dodgy webcams, DVRs, domestic broad band routers and 'intelligent' toasters.

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8 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

Many of the IoT devices used in the attack had both  login and password set to 'admin' and port 23 wide open for telnet attacks. No need to be a hacking genius to compromise those sorts of systems. Once you have set up with a payload then it is just a question of pointing them at the target and lighting the blue touch paper. It is ironic that the internet is designed to survive nuclear war but can be bought to its knees by dodgy webcams, DVRs, domestic broad band routers and 'intelligent' toasters.

Hacking a n unprotected camera/CCTV/toaster with an unprotected/default ssh/telnet port is simple.

Coordinating that attack and writing the firmware to do it, without affecting the camera/cctv operation is less simple.

 

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