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wish I could afford one

Self awareness

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Standing in front of me in the check-out queue this morning were two very distinct demographics.

Directly in front of me was a youngish couple with a couple of small children.  Their purchases were clearly focused on healthy eating but on a careful budget.  Plenty of bottom shelf purchases but also plenty of fresh vegetables.  As an example the carrots were of the local supermarket branded variety.  Bill total was £37 odd.

At the front of the queue were a couple of the grey haired variety clearly buying just for two.  Their purchases looked like a shrine to the Unilever gods.  Additionally, they had organic carrots FFS.  So far so good until they received a bill in the high £80's.  Their response to the cashier "Oh, isn't that great value...".

Now I acknowledge their at peak wealth while the young couple are just starting out but talk about total lack of awareness for two reasons:

  • a complete lack of sensitivity to what's going on around them.  Either that or they are just trying to gloat at 'how clever they are"...
  • clearly know the price of everything and the value of nothing

This simple example then carries through our current society in so many areas causing so many problems.

Rant over

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It has always struck me how much an anomaly it is that British baby boomers are so wealthy and younger people completely not.  Shopping in the US or in France (both of which I spend a lot on time in), there's a very clear class divide between professional-type people, of various ages, shopping in the nicer stores, whereas in the UK it is almost exclusively older people, often retired non-professionals, shopping there.  The obvious example is Waitrose.  Outside of a few peak periods such as lunch time, right after work or the weekends (i.e. when working people can go shopping), you can go in the store and 90% to 95% of the clientele are over 60.  Outside of Britain, that's just not normal.

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People who can and can spare the time will do best to make food from scratch, sometimes in bulk portions to freeze......those who can't or won't or who are elderly will buy the more expensive and easy option....ready made to warm and consume....some have that choice, others do not, they have to take the easy, quick option only because they are unable or choose the harder, time consuming but better way.;)

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4 minutes ago, richc said:

It has always struck me how much an anomaly it is that British baby boomers are so wealthy and younger people completely not.  Shopping in the US or in France (both of which I spend a lot on time in), there's a very clear class divide between professional-type people, of various ages, shopping in the nicer stores, whereas in the UK it is almost exclusively older people, often retired non-professionals, shopping there.  The obvious example is Waitrose.  Outside of a few peak periods such as lunch time, right after work or the weekends (i.e. when working people can go shopping), you can go in the store and 90% to 95% of the clientele are over 60.  Outside of Britain, that's just not normal.

Some people have to look at the price of the food they are purchasing, they have a tight food budget.....others never look at the price they put in their basket what they fancy at the time.....wastage from those who do not have a strict budget is higher than those who have to be careful with what they buy and how they use it, they see to it that there is no or very little waste. ;)

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When the UK needed to invigorate its economy (2000s, then on steroids from 2008) it wanted an immediate stimulus, rather than something more drawn out (ie, stimulate, but don't bother with investment -- the theory goes that stimulate well enough and the investment looks after itself).

So, it directed its stimulative cash towards those most likely to spend, and least likely to save.  That is, pensioners and those on welfare.  There isn't any point in providing stimulative cash to nice middle class people as they will only save it, so they just shove a few bungs their way to keep them quiet.

The trouble is years of this emergency stimulation have unbalanced the economy so that it is dependent on this expenditure.  At the same time, the trickle-over investment didn't come about -- or, at least, it didn't come about within this country in a form that would lead to exports.  Instead we've got an inward looking economy (lots of services) with poor exports and lots of companies exporting stuff to us (poor balance of payments).

Beyond the pensioners vs workers, I find it odd that in the UK those with wealth are most likely to be those who have a business/product that provides an internal service (most visibly any government body, but extending way beyond that -- eg, the coffee shop economy) or merely import stuff with a high mark-up.  Those who are trying to export have largely been crucified*.

My prediction for the next few years is that this will reverse, and that people managing to earn foreign currency will be relatively wealthy vs those earning £s.  (it might carry on the same for quite a while, though).

[I'd add that this makes me particularly cross.  One important purpose of stimulative money is to keep export-type business with at least highish startup costs ticking over during recessions, so that come the end of the recession they're ready to start earning again.  We've let the export-capable companies with high startup costs go to the dogs, while we've supported those internal facing companies with low startup costs.  This is absolutely mad.]

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1 hour ago, wish I could afford one said:

Standing in front of me in the check-out queue this morning were two very distinct demographics.

It seems fair that you should tell us what was in your shopping basket/trolley.

"Let he that is without sin cast the first stone" and all that..!

;)

 

XYY

 

 

                                                                                                               

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

 

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1 minute ago, The XYY Man said:

It seems only fair that you should tell us what was in your shopping basket/trolley.

"Let he that is without sin cast the first stone" and all that..!

;)

 

XYY

                                                                                                           

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

It looks like I've been outed :D

£35.39 worth which will see us through the week.  Plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables with plenty of them of the misshapen 'value' variety.

I practice a concept that I call the 'lowest priced grocery shop'.  I buy the cheapest of everything.  Anything that's ok I stay with.  Anything that's not I go to the next highest price.  Rinse and repeat until I've settled on the right level for all food types.

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2 minutes ago, Bossybabe said:

It really rules me that the retired insist on food shopping at the weekend. That should be for working people only. 

I'm reasonably tolerant of that.  The one that gets to me is when I have 3 minutes for lunch and a retiree is in front of me at a local 'Express' supermarket at 1230 with a full shopping trolley and with a single cashier...

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1 hour ago, richc said:

It has always struck me how much an anomaly it is that British baby boomers are so wealthy and younger people completely not.  Shopping in the US or in France (both of which I spend a lot on time in), there's a very clear class divide between professional-type people, of various ages, shopping in the nicer stores, whereas in the UK it is almost exclusively older people, often retired non-professionals, shopping there.  The obvious example is Waitrose.  Outside of a few peak periods such as lunch time, right after work or the weekends (i.e. when working people can go shopping), you can go in the store and 90% to 95% of the clientele are over 60.  Outside of Britain, that's just not normal.

I'm not sure how the Waitrose example illustrates your initial point.  If working people do go to an upmarket place like that, in their out-of-work hours, that suggests that they're not too penny-pinched.  And I'm not particularly surprised to learn that benefit chavs with normal working hours available to them, aren't to be found in any significant numbers in Waitrose, and am puzzled as to how this makes Britain unique in this regard.

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4 minutes ago, ChewingGrass said:

Pretend it's the 1970s and your shopping is dirt cheap.

With a packet of ten Player's No.6 costing just ten-and-a-half new-pence - you're damn right it was Chewy...!

;)

 

XYY

                                                                                                                

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

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I have just stocked up on 'posh' ready meals from cookfood.net. Enough food to last for 10 days. I have done this because I have two weeks of a hellish work schedule (7am - 9pm sort of thing) and at this moment in time don't have the energy to prepare from scratch and have already eaten everything that I made and froze in advance.

The sad thing is that I am too embarrassed to be seen buying this in the shop. It is being delivered (free of charge) tomorrow. Does that make me an inverted something?

 

 

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8 minutes ago, CunningPlan said:

I have just stocked up on 'posh' ready meals from cookfood.net. Enough food to last for 10 days. I have done this because I have two weeks of a hellish work schedule (7am - 9pm sort of thing) and at this moment in time don't have the energy to prepare from scratch and have already eaten everything that I made and froze in advance.

The sad thing is that I am too embarrassed to be seen buying this in the shop. It is being delivered (free of charge) tomorrow. Does that make me an inverted something?

If I ate ready meals for 10 days I think I would actually be physically ill.  Is that a sensible thing to be doing?  I'm guessing you'll get no health benefits and plenty of preservatives that probably aren't very good for you.

Full disclosure:  Could just be me as in fairness I'm now at the point in life where even the smell of McDonalds makes me feel sick. 

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Some people are earning money to enable them to pay for their ready or convenience meals....others with the time but not the money are saving by creating better for less.....;)

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21 minutes ago, wish I could afford one said:

If I ate ready meals for 10 days I think I would actually be physically ill.  Is that a sensible thing to be doing?  I'm guessing you'll get no health benefits and plenty of preservatives that probably aren't very good for you.

Full disclosure:  Could just be me as in fairness I'm now at the point in life where even the smell of McDonalds makes me feel sick. 

They are not really traditional 'ready meals' I have sampled a few and they taste pretty much exactly the same as I would have made myself - the ingredients list is actually like you would expect to use at home and there are no preservatives etc. I agree about conventional ready meals. Even an M&S curry leaves me feeling miserable.

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PS - I don't intend to eat ready meals for ten days straight - but it is a contingency plan as we need food and really hate delivered pizzas. Hopefully there will be some time / energy to cook at least every other day.

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2 hours ago, Bossybabe said:

It really rules me that the retired insist on food shopping at the weekend. That should be for working people only. 

True in the past, but very many of the working people I have come across recently weekend work is the norm....every day of the week is equal, no particular day is different from another.....how times have changed, greater numbers of working days = more working hours = more growth.....fit your spending in the remaining hours available.;)

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Thursday was the pay-day for the people in my locale who used to dig coal for a living.

Still one of the busiest days of the week - despite the pits closing over 30 years ago...

 

XYY

                                                                                                                

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

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2 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

Thursday used to be pay-day for the people in my locale who used to dig coal for a living.

Still one of the busiest days of the week - despite the pits closing over 30 years ago...

 

XYY

 

                                                                                                                

 

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

 

Old habits die hard, its friday afternoon and evening in my neck of the woods as a lot of the old engineering firms etc would finish at lunchtime on friday after cleaning the machines with the weekends shopping being done on the way home or shortly after.

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5 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

Thursday was the pay-day for the people in my locale who used to dig coal for a living.

Still one of the busiest days of the week - despite the pits closing over 30 years ago...

 

XYY

                                                                                                                

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

Pavlovs payday.

Youll be turning up in Scarborough in mid August still.

 

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1 hour ago, CunningPlan said:

They are not really traditional 'ready meals' I have sampled a few and they taste pretty much exactly the same as I would have made myself - the ingredients list is actually like you would expect to use at home and there are no preservatives etc. I agree about conventional ready meals. Even an M&S curry leaves me feeling miserable.

Doing it wrong.

Get a M+S ready curry.

Get a frying pan. Chop up chile + garlic.

Chile + garlic, fried up, microwave the M+S curry for 2 minutes.

Drop in frying pan with chile + garlic.

It *really* makes a difference!

Turning bland into something bordering on curry house, which, frankly, do something very similar.

 

 

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1 hour ago, CunningPlan said:

PS - I don't intend to eat ready meals for ten days straight - but it is a contingency plan as we need food and really hate delivered pizzas. Hopefully there will be some time / energy to cook at least every other day.

 

Stop falling into the trap of justifying yourself to the skinflinterati, on here, saving money on food is their favourite hobby - or at least talking about it, I wouldn't be surprised if they're not on first name terms at the nearest takeaway.

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17 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Pavlovs payday.

Youll be turning up in Scarborough in mid August still.

 

Me and Mrs XYY prefer Runswick Bay or Whitby for our mid-August frolics these days...

 

XYY

                                                                                                                

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

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1 minute ago, The XYY Man said:

Me and Mrs XYY prefer Runswick Bay or Whitby for our mid-August frolics these days...

 

XYY

                                                                                                                

 

The dog's kennel is not the place to keep a sausage - Danish proverb

 

Ive never 'got' Runswick Bay. My camp Maths teacher lived/lives there. It has limited entertainment.

Whitby's pretty limited too. If Ive not be banned from a pub then one of my brothers have.

So cans, under the old viaduct, looking for a seal. The real exclusive place in Whitby is up by the old gasworks.

Places like Harrys Bar are for Co Durham ponces.

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