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Poll - Should Carney be sacked?


Should Carney be sacked?  

156 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Carney be sacked?

    • Yes
      141
    • No
      15


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On 10/17/2016 at 7:57 AM, TheCountOfNowhere said:

Carney needs to go today !!! Cu84J30XgAAnd09.jpg

Maybe he really doesn't know how often Britain has tried the devaluation method to "help the economy adjust" and a manipulation of mere financial figures done to such an extent and clearly failed and really fixed nothing (except lining their own pockets) that he thinks suggesting that yet another attempt will succeed this time.  

If it wasn't so clearly dangerous for Britain's long term economic balance then the breathtaking childishness of his apparent belief in it might even be almost convincing. 

Edited by billybong
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6 minutes ago, frederico said:

His position is becoming untenable, embarrassing even. He's either been lying or extremely incompetent.

All contracts can be ended at any time if all parties agree.

This is my point.

He is being forced out. Rightly so. He is a complete moron. Anyone who is any doubt spend some time listening to him talk. He tries to sound very intelligent but talks mostly unintelligible nonsense. A total shill from the Bilderberg old guard. He has been there with one remit, QE and super low IR, talk and talk but basically act for the banks.

This is very good news.

It looks as if the world might actually be about to right itself.

Mario Draghi should be shitting his pants.

Currency war?

Edited by bubbleturbo
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5 hours ago, bubbleturbo said:

The story relating to his possible departure has apparently come about because Carney has been shooting his mouth off to some bankster mates in the City.

 

For me at least, this is too much speculation given the interest in the post in consideration.

 

5 hours ago, Si1 said:

He should be independent even to the point of keeping his private counsel when in conversation with financial industry figures.

He was asked again by the Lords committee during the week whether he intended to stay beyond the five-year point. Of all the questions that could be asked, I honestly don't think it's worth spending much time on. Policy, yes, actions, yes. Personality, not so much.

Given his independence is best tested by taking actions that fulfil his remit against political expediency, these kind of tests could be a kind of get out of jail free card.

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...he politicised his position during the referendum campaign which was for the people ...and continues to do so with every opening of mouth ..the referendum was not for politicians and certainly not for the Governor of the Bank of England unless he was unfit for the role ...and so it proved ...every time he opens his mouth now there is danger for the country in the shadow of a EU that is not fit for purpose .....who are these pseudo elites who wish to hold on to undemocratic self imagined power ..?..why do they think they are acceptable .....?....probably because they think we are all stupid and don't understand ....let the will of the people triumph...that's a start in democracy....with a long way to go.......:rolleyes:

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8 minutes ago, Grumpysod said:

 

 

You beat me by a few minutes:)

I nearly spit my drink out after seeing that headline on the BBC news site.

There is a measure in this world these days of measuring the carbon footprint people leave, with the Carney's of the world I really think there should be some similar when measuring debt. Like so many on HPC I am a productive self reliant working man with decent savings that just puts in rather than takes out, I am Caney,s worst nightmare with such a small debt footprint, the banks and government/private borrowing being the worst.

 I took heart from the praise signalling his obit. "You did a great job Mark, will that do for your CV? now quietly, please shove off".

Commenting upon your other point, I know the system doesn't like me as it did nothing for me but take from me. In response I've gone as much under the radar, and as self sufficient, as possible.

Edited by LiveinHope
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3 minutes ago, Grumpysod said:

I have done the same in so many ways. In Carney's world where you take on huge debt and play rich and successful by buying a hugely expensive homes you cannot afford so you can sneer at the renting under achievers. I am quite happy to play their game, Carney's Britain looks down on me life a lowlife under achiever, so that's what I will present to them, without going into too much detail it can save you a lot of money in so many ways, well I am one of the under achievers :)

Isn't it liberating. I've always underachieved so much

Edited by LiveinHope
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3 minutes ago, Grumpysod said:

I have done the same in so many ways. In Carney's world where you take on huge debt and play rich and successful by buying a hugely expensive homes you cannot afford so you can sneer at the renting under achievers. I am quite happy to play their game, Carney's Britain looks down on me life a lowlife under achiever, so that's what I will present to them, without going into too much detail it can save you a lot of money in so many ways, well I am one of the under achievers :)

There is a term for those living beyond their means: fur coat and no nickers 

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The FT will know better than most They say "Mr Carney is said to be leaning strongly towards staying in his post." https://www.ft.com/content/5107a124-9eb5-11e6-891e-abe238dee8e2

Doesn't sound like he'll jump so it will be up to May to tell him he's not wanted (as Hammond won't). And as we now know from the secret Goldman Sachs speech, May is playing a role of an eager Brexitier rather than being truly convinced so I think Carney will be staying. 

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No.  I want him there in the job, responsible, when it all collapses.  I want HIM to explain how he let it grow and grow and get so bad.

 

No escape.

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44 minutes ago, wherebee said:

No.  I want him there in the job, responsible, when it all collapses.  I want HIM to explain how he let it grow and grow and get so bad.

 

No escape.

Yeah, him.

Because before 1 July 2013 we had ourselves a nice little economy going; balanced across various sectors and not concentrated in financial services, no asset price bubble, a trading surplus, no fiscal deficit, no money printing. Everything was under control.

Then this Canadian ex-GS chappy turned up and ruined it.

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1 hour ago, wherebee said:

No.  I want him there in the job, responsible, when it all collapses.  I want HIM to explain how he let it grow and grow and get so bad.

 

No escape.

 

59 minutes ago, Bland Unsight said:

Yeah, him.

Because before 1 July 2013 we had ourselves a nice little economy going; balanced across various sectors and not concentrated in financial services, no asset price bubble, a trading surplus, no fiscal deficit, no money printing. Everything was under control.

Then this Canadian ex-GS chappy turned up and ruined it.

 

58 minutes ago, wherebee said:

Did I say that? LOL no.

 

But it would be nice if just ONE of the decision makers was in the hot seat when it explodes.

I don't see anything to laugh about.

If you'd chastised him for letting it get any worse you might have had a point, but even that would be a tough sell.

My personal take on things is that it was a great opportunity for him because we were already a basket case. It's the opposite of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". Given that it was totally f*cked already, the worse that could happen is that it would be just as totally f*cked when he left it as it was when he found it.

Of course back in 2013 few people would have anticipated Cameron's little referendum gambit and its consequences, but surely nobody is trying to pin our longstanding troubled relationship with the EU and its recent denouement on Carney, or are they?

Edited by Bland Unsight
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9 minutes ago, Grumpysod said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37815516

 

It all makes sense now.

For the life of me I could not see how May and her new government could allow Cameron and Osbournes puppet to remain. I am now getting the feeling the Mays government were hoping that Carney would pack his bags after 5 years and go. Carney on the other hand probably knows he has out stayed his welcome and will not go without a pay off now.

Even if it is only a few million to get rid of him it will not look good in the media, even though in my books it will be well worth the money, 

When memebers of the public are talking about you being hung for treason, you know it's time to go :lol:

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7 hours ago, Bland Unsight said:

 

 

I don't see anything to laugh about.

If you'd chastised him for letting it get any worse you might have had a point, but even that would be a tough sell.

My personal take on things is that it was a great opportunity for him because we were already a basket case. It's the opposite of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". Given that it was totally f*cked already, the worse that could happen is that it would be just as totally f*cked when he left it as it was when he found it.

Of course back in 2013 few people would have anticipated Cameron's little referendum gambit and its consequences, but surely nobody is trying to pin our longstanding troubled relationship with the EU and its recent denouement on Carney, or are they?

 

Carney only did what he was asked to. Pump up the housing bubble, keep interest rates low, print more money to give the illusion of a healthy economy, get involved in the Brexit debate.......... you name it he did it. But, his old masters are history and he should be too. No doubt about it in my mind.

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2 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

 

Carney only did what he was asked to. Pump up the housing bubble, keep interest rates low, print more money to give the illusion of a healthy economy, get involved in the Brexit debate.......... you name it he did it. But, his old masters are history and he should be too. No doubt about it in my mind.

His masters will still be there in the background. 

I posted a thread a few weeks ago saying it looked like TPTB had decided to cause a crash.  It looks more and more like this with every passing day.

 

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35 minutes ago, TheCountOfNowhere said:

I posted a thread a few weeks ago saying it looked like TPTB had decided to cause a crash.  It looks more and more like this with every passing day.

 

Totally agree and have been saying this for a while. The fact is that a lot more money can be made (wealth transferred) in a cyclical market. Brexit is the perfect scapegoat.

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